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Thread: What can I do with this fabric?

  1. #1
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    What can I do with this fabric?

    I just bought a box full of "quilting fabric" at an online estate sale. Fortunately, I didn't pay much for it. However, now I have about 30 yards of mostly 1 yard cuts and a few 2 yard cuts of polyester (I think) seersucker. (I haven't done a burn test, but it feels like polyester.) It's still in the box and bags it came in about 8 years ago. I opened one of the bags that was labeled 1 yard of white, but it was 2.5 yards of a floral, so I'm not sure how much yardage is there. It would make great kids (probably girl) quilts if it wasn't polyester.

    Any suggestion of what to do with it (including gifting it to a charity)?

    bkay

  2. #2
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    Polyester and cotton/ polyester blends actually make great kids quilts. They hold up to lots of wear & tear, laundering. Make forts- have picnics, great play quilts. No reason to not make kids quilts with the fabrics
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  3. #3
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    I’ve use poly in quilts with no issues.

  4. #4
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
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    I made quilts for my dog's bed using polyester . . . very durable. I made a rag quilt with denim and polyester for the car . . . it was also durable and comes in handy to sit on at the park, to wrap around items I'm moving from place to place and when I had a flat tire, it saved me from getting so dirty. Polyester makes some great outdoor quilts and utility quilts. They're not quilt show quality but many enjoy them.

  5. #5
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    Are you talking about 100% poly knit? Or, cotton poly blend? I think MaryMo is talking about the poly knits. If you have cotton poly blends, I treat it as regular fabric all the time with no problem. Great stuff for quilts.

  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    The first quilt I made had a polyester backing.
    The LQS had recommended I use poly, because it was king size, and it would slide better.
    Otherwise, bulky, weighty, and cotton backing against the sheets, it would be hard to move.

    It seemed odd at the time ... but with use, I was sure glad I listened to them!
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  7. #7
    Super Member QuiltingVagabond's Avatar
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    How about giving to a group that makes the little girls dresses (pillowcase dresses I think they are called)?
    QuiltingVagabond aka Kathy

  8. #8
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Make charity dresses with the seersucker, and pillowcases with any smoother fabric. There are always shelters looking for pillowcases...
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
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  9. #9
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
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    Polyester was "in" during some of my Mom's quilting era. Those quilts wear like iron. I don't think that ever wears out or fades. Use any pattern you like!
    Mavis

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    Dresses for Africa. Check out a church group who would be sending packages.

  11. #11
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    You can make quilts out of anything and All donated quilts are appreciated. Think about the old fashioned crazy quilts made of cotton, wool, velvet, lace, whatever was available. They all had one thing in common - they are beautiful! The only thing I would do is to wash everything (including the new fabric) in fairly hot water to make sure any and all shrinkage is handled. I am one of those who does not prewash, but in this case I would.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-14-2019 at 11:15 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  12. #12
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    polyester is not recommended for children's clothing or bedding. fires burn poly fabrics very fast.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by institches33 View Post
    Dresses for Africa. Check out a church group who would be sending packages.
    I found their website, but there were no links to local groups who might use the fabric. Fabric is heavy, so shipping is expensive. I'd love to donate it to that, as it's appropriate for those cute dresses. Making the dresses is not something I will ever do.

    (I've reached the "l won't live forever" stage of my life, so I'm paying more attention to what I say I'm going to do and trying to be realistic about what I will actually do.)

    bkay

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    I understand polyester would make a good quilt. I chose black polyester broadcloth(?) for sashing a child's quilt because I wanted to reduce the chances of fading. It was a pain. It would shrink when you pressed it, so it was really hard to get everything to line up. I had to make the sashing twice on several blocks. I swore I'd never use polyester again in a quilt. I would donate it for someone else to make. I'll check with Project Linus to see if it's something they can use.

    bkay

  15. #15
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    For many years I happily used poly blends, especially for solids for the bright colors. There aren't really any problems in using it for quilting -- however, be warned that when you are used to working with cottons poly are very slippery! I pin anyways, but if you don't usually pin you should. If you go back to the old magazines and such, poly blends were often recommended for the sheen and lack of ironing.

    I can't hardly find any double-knits in the thrift stores any more, but they were actually preferred by at least one group I used to donate to for quilts for the homeless as they dry easier than cottons and are extremely durable and sturdy.

    I've used textured fabrics before as well in quilts. Usually best to do something simple like 6" squares of the textured with alternating blocks or 9-patches or whatever.

    Edit/PS: I've brought along a piece of a poly blend to my mom's. I don't do much garment construction any more but I'm going to make some Kuspuks (Innuit Summer Parkas). I'll be making a personalized "pattern" for myself out of the poly. Usually I use old sheets for that sort of thing, but I'm out of those and had that piece of yardage, so it's what I'm going to do.
    Last edited by Iceblossom; 05-14-2019 at 09:33 AM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    For many years I used poly fabric making quilts as cotton was impossible to find, poly was the new wash and wear. Just use a cooler iron and more pins. Poly quilts wear like iron and are very soft. Peace, Brenda

  17. #17
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    If you are thinking about making clothing remember that polyester is warmer - it does not breathe like straight cotton does. I wonder if it would be a good idea for Africa?

  18. #18
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Poly blends are wonderful for quilts. Just don't mix it with cotton. Poly blends wear like iron, cotton doesn't.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  19. #19
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    I dislike poly because it pills as it wears. Same reason I never ever buy blend bedsheets

  20. #20
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    You'd think I wrote what kiswift did! Totally agree with that comment. I love the sheen, the durability and the color fastness of poly blend. I especially use it when needing black so it doesn't become brown with aging. Yes, be careful of the iron temperature. I, too, have had it shrink before my eyes! When my daughters were born as summer babies, I made their receiving blankets from seersucker and loved them. But then years later I bought seersucker to make a summer robe for myself. In the meantime the manufacturer of seersucker decided it was a good idea to put poly in that fabric. Augh!!! Hot! When it was cotton, it was a wonderful summer fabric so do be careful what you choose to use it for. If you find you have some of the fabric that won't work for your own projects, you might consider making pillowcases to donate to various agencies or facilities. Am I thinking correctly that your 1 yard pieces --if you have 2 coordinating fabrics, could yield 2 pillowcases with a larger piece being the body and the shorter one being the hem portion?
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-15-2019 at 03:35 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  21. #21
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    I checked with the local Project Linus. She said no in a really nice way. She said she had given some to Love Thy Baby, so I emailed them. I have not heard back.

    I would guess that I have 25 unique prints and solid colors. They are in pinks, turquoise, green and reds - kind of a fruit/flower coordinated group. They are probably all in one line of fabric. It came from Jo Ann's abut 10 years ago. If I don't find a charity that wants it, I'll put it in a garage sale.

  22. #22
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Another place to check is a local Seniors Centre, or even Retirement Homes.
    Many of them have active quilters/sewers who would appreciate free fabric.

    Or offer to local church groups and guilds.
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  23. #23
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    Love thy baby wants it. Thanks so much for your input.

    bkay

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