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Thread: WHAT was I thinking?? Now what to do??

  1. #1
    Junior Member Carol in WI's Avatar
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    I am making a QAYG using the D9P pattern and copied from Marykoch's example (thanks Mary, your's is beautiful!). I decided to make the reverse side a D9P also using just 2 colors. That's when I must have lost my mind ~ I tried to SID around my blocks. What ever made me think I could SID on BOTH sides of the 'road'? Now what to do ...Do any of you have suggestions of how to quilt this? I'm not a FMQ and so it needs to be fairly simple. Straight lines perhaps or use a template design? What do you think would look good from both sides?

    Front of quilt
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    Back of quilt
    Name:  Attachment-265373.jpe
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  2. #2
    np3
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    Power Poster np3's Avatar
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    Oops! No ideas, but it sounds like something I might have done!

  3. #3
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
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    The blocks look to be a mirror image of each other so when they are placed back to back don't all the seams line up exactly?

    You could always cut new back blocks for the QAYG method and then use the second set of pieced blocks as a second quilt top.

  4. #4
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    Meander

  5. #5
    Junior Member Freddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol in WI
    I am making a QAYG using the D9P pattern and copied from Marykoch's example (thanks Mary, your's is beautiful!). I decided to make the reverse side a D9P also using just 2 colors. That's when I must have lost my mind ~ I tried to SID around my blocks. What ever made me think I could SID on BOTH sides of the 'road'? Now what to do ...Do any of you have suggestions of how to quilt this? I'm not a FMQ and so it needs to be fairly simple. Straight lines perhaps or use a template design? What do you think would look good from both sides?
    Looking at the blocks,the back side blocks are identical to the front blocks. It does not look so on the picture, but you will turn them around when they go on the back. I assume they will be close. Might not be a good idea to SId, but how about a small design in some larger areas? Use template or make triangle. You won't notice if you are not exactly in the middle on the backside. Of course you could hand tie the quilt too. Good luck. Love the color scheme and pattern.

  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose L
    The blocks look to be a mirror image of each other so when they are placed back to back don't all the seams line up exactly?

    You could always cut new back blocks for the QAYG method and then use the second set of pieced blocks as a second quilt top.
    The blocks are mirror images, though it'd be next thing to impossible to get them to line up perfectly as you do SITD.

    When doing a pieced back, you really do need to think as to how they are going to go together when it comes to quilting.

    I think a second quilt might be the solution ... unless you want to do an all over meander or some sort of a panto-style design.

  7. #7
    dd
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    I agree with 2 separate quilts. I don't think you will be able to match up perfectly on each square.

  8. #8
    Senior Member cat-on-a-mac's Avatar
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    You could do squares inside each of the big squares ... maybe 1/4 inch from the seam -- then it wouldn't matter so much of the seams don't line up exactly. You could use red thread on the black and grey side, and grey or black on the red and white side.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Work diagonally in increments that ignore your block sizes. Then no one will ever know what side you worked from.

  10. #10
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I wouldn't even try to match. If you truly want it to be reversible, I think a meander is just fine. If you want to do something fancier than that--make 2 quilts. There is nothing wrong with a couple loop-de-loops in each block or even the good old fashioned X across each one.

  11. #11
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    You could always do straight lines 2 inches apart or you could try a simple meadering.

  12. #12
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    This is a great idea.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lacelady
    Work diagonally in increments that ignore your block sizes. Then no one will ever know what side you worked from.

  13. #13
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    I would try straight line withthe walking foot on but instead of in the ditch just wiggle through the middle ina rough grid. It's quick easy and surprisingly effective.

    I would trim the wadding to the same size as the blocks. Attach one side with basting spray and then use pins to align the pieces front and back using the seams as a guide.

    you don't say what QAYG method you are going to use. You probably need some kind of grid for this one to retain your sanity. A 1" on the front ( cut 2" strips and sew on with a 1/2" seam allowance to both front edges). Your blocks will take it and look like they are being viewed through a leaded window if it is dark enough. Cut strips 1 1/2" for the back and fold and press them in half wrong sides together. Stitch them to one edge on the back through all the layers, turn the folded edge across and carefully top stitch just on the edge. This will give you a half inch grid on the back with a one inch grid on the front and a pair of stitched tracks 1/2" apart down the sashing grid on the front but it is zero hand sewing required.

    Does that help? I love split nine patches. All the ones I have done have been single sided and meander quilted, but I haven't made any big enough to warrent a QAYG approach. let us know how it turns out!

    best Becks

  14. #14
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    I would try straight line withthe walking foot on but instead of in the ditch just wiggle through the middle ina rough grid. It's quick easy and surprisingly effective.

    I would trim the wadding to the same size as the blocks. Attach one side with basting spray and then use pins to align the pieces front and back using the seams as a guide.

    you don't say what QAYG method you are going to use. You probably need some kind of grid for this one to retain your sanity. A 1" on the front ( cut 2" strips and sew on with a 1/2" seam allowance to both front edges). Your blocks will take it and look like they are being viewed through a leaded window if it is dark enough. Cut strips 1 1/2" for the back and fold and press them in half wrong sides together. Stitch them to one edge on the back through all the layers, turn the folded edge across and carefully top stitch just on the edge. This will give you a half inch grid on the back with a one inch grid on the front and a pair of stitched tracks 1/2" apart down the sashing grid on the front but it is zero hand sewing required.

    Does that help? I love split nine patches. All the ones I have done have been single sided and meander quilted, but I haven't made any big enough to warrent a QAYG approach. let us know how it turns out!

    best Becks

  15. #15
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    The back of your quilt is stunning!

  16. #16
    Super Member mimom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glassquilt
    Meander
    I agree, its the only way to make both sides look good. You will never get the blocks to line up perfectly

  17. #17
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    An old-time hanging diamond?

  18. #18
    Senior Member emmah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol in WI
    I am making a QAYG using the D9P pattern and copied from Marykoch's example (thanks Mary, your's is beautiful!). I decided to make the reverse side a D9P also using just 2 colors. That's when I must have lost my mind ~ I tried to SID around my blocks. What ever made me think I could SID on BOTH sides of the 'road'? Now what to do ...Do any of you have suggestions of how to quilt this? I'm not a FMQ and so it needs to be fairly simple. Straight lines perhaps or use a template design? What do you think would look good from both sides?
    Since your design is straight line squares, maybe a quilting pattern that incorporates curves or circles would enhance the finished quilt.

  19. #19
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    Meander.

  20. #20
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    If your blocks are identically sized, you can line them up. This is how I did it. First make sure that your tetanus shots are up to date.
    Take the backing square and put a thumb tack through each seam intersection that you want to match up, working from the front of the block, so the point comes out the back.
    Lay the block on a flat surface and CAREFULLY smooth your batting over, being careful not to stick youself!
    Now lay the top over the batting. The thumb tacks will allow you to match the intersections. Pin the heck out of it so it won't shift when you quilt it then remove the tacks.
    Again, this will only work if the 2 blocks are really close in dimension.
    I used this method to center a motif on a pieced back with the front of the quilt.

  21. #21
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    If your blocks are identically sized, you can line them up. This is how I did it. First make sure that your tetanus shots are up to date.
    Take the backing square and put a thumb tack through each seam intersection that you want to match up, working from the front of the block, so the point comes out the back.
    Lay the block on a flat surface and CAREFULLY smooth your batting over, being careful not to stick youself!
    Now lay the top over the batting. The thumb tacks will allow you to match the intersections. Pin the heck out of it so it won't shift when you quilt it then remove the tacks.
    Again, this will only work if the 2 blocks are really close in dimension.
    I used this method to center a motif on a pieced back with the front of the quilt.
    If doing this, it may be easier to use the long flower head pins that you use for OBW ... and follow the same technique

  22. #22
    Junior Member goosepoint's Avatar
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    Both are beautiful. I would do 2 separate quilts. Use solids on the backs of both.

  23. #23
    Super Member pattypurple's Avatar
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    I took a machine quilting class and the most useful thing I learned was diagonal wavy lines. I have a wavy line stitch on my machine which I make fairly long and then just go corner to corner. You can do it free motion also. Sometimes I do it both diagonals and sometimes only one. Of course I usually only make baby or lap size quilts.
    Love you color choices

  24. #24
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    Maybe do 2" crosshatching on the diagonal.

  25. #25
    Member She In PA's Avatar
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    If you have a wavy line stitch on you machine it works well.

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