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Thread: What kind of thread to use?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    I am wondering...what kind of thread you use for FMG, by hand or SITD - 100% cotton, cotton poly, quilting thread ( that feels more heavy duty to me), and why?

  2. #2
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    Hand quilting thread is used for hand quilting. It is glazed so it glides through the layers better. It cannot be used in a machine.

    I don't machine quilt so can't help you there.

  3. #3
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    Quilt with whatever you want! But don't put glazed hand quilting thread in a machine, it'll damage the tension discs. Don't use fragile (old, cheap) thread on a quilt that will be used and washed. And consider colorfastness, melting temp, thickness, etc when determining which thread is suitable for your project.

  4. #4
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    There are many choices! The only wrong choice I can think of is Hand Quilting thread. Basically it comes down to what you like and what works well in your machine. I love Aurifil and Wonderfil threads. I also use Guttermann, Sulky Blendables, YLI. As for how to choose...first I go by color. I love variegated threads and shop by color first, then see what brand has a suitable color for my project. Most of the time, it's Aurifil and Wonderfil for me.

  5. #5
    k3n
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    Power Poster k3n's Avatar
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    Superior - either Masterpiece or King Tut, occasionally Aurifil and YLI 60 wt. Why? Because it's quality thread and I and my machine work better with it than cheap threads. ;)

  6. #6
    Senior Member scrapykate's Avatar
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    I use Aurfil and sometimes the Superior thread. Coat and clarks throws too much lint for my liking. Now that I have a variety of threads, I just go with what I like for the project.

  7. #7
    Member SuperiorThreads's Avatar
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    I agree with everyone, hand quilting threads are glazed or coated and could gum up your machine. Use a good quality thread and you won't have any problems at all. If you don't want to see your SID quilting use a clear mono filament thread or a 60 wt polyester.
    Ricci

  8. #8
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    So far on all three of my machines Ive had the best luck with good ol Coats and Clarks.
    Just set up my strait stitch machine for long arm free motion. Tried several threads, Connecting Threads just kept breaking. Got Coats and Clarks machine quilting thread and it works perfect.
    I also have a cheap Brother and a Viking Sapphire and they both like Coats and Clarks the best. Not the cheap kind that Walmart carries but the kind with the snap up top.

  9. #9
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I love almost all threads for FMQ - from poly serger thread to 30wt cotton to 3-ply embroidery thread. Old Coats and Clark, ThreadArt, Superior Threads, Connecting Threads, Dual Duty, Star Cotton - love 'em all. :)

    I just started learning to hand quilt using a Barnett lap hoop and the "Aunt Becky" method and I bought some Americana glazed hand quilting thread for that - I really like that stuff, but I don't have anything to compare it to other than the Dual Duty I used years ago and that was fine, too.

    Try lots of stuff for FMQ and see what you like to work with. :)

  10. #10
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    oops.... double-post! :oops:

  11. #11
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Pretty much what everyone else said - the only real "rule" is that hand quilting thread is not for machine quilting, and check old thread to see if they break easily before using them in your machine. If you can snap it with your hands - chances are pretty good it can snap in your machine.

    Other than that ... choose what you like either by color or weight. Sometimes you'll want a heavier (12, 28 or 30 wt) to stand out more, sometimes you'll want to stick with the usual 40 or 50 wt. Match the bobbin weight similar to the top weight - for example I use 60wt in the bobbin a lot with a 50wt in the top, but using a 60wt in the bobbin with a 30wt in the top will produce poor results.

    You also need to make sure that your using the right thread with the right needle to get good results. Don't discount a thread until you've made sure to try it on at least 2 different needle sizes (perhaps even 3 if it's a heavier thread).


    Buy thread in different colors and weights and fibre content from different manufacturers - then give them all a try. I recently did a large FMQ project and discovered that there were at least three thread manufacturers in my collection that I didn't like because of the amount of fuzz they produced, and some produced fray's and breakages - and one of them is a *top* name brand - so YOU need to try them with your machine and your style of quilting - then make YOUR decision. And if you have more than one machine - each machine may produce different results.

    Of the three that I didn't like - I did a trade for the 10 new or almost new spools of one manufacturer because I also didn't like the "look" of the thread (no sheen to it at all, looked dull and fuzzy while it was still on the spool). The others I kept and I'll use them eventually, even if it's just for sewing on buttons and binding.

    The threads I love ... Aurifil, and Superior in the top, and I'll also use Gutterman in the bobbin (not crazy about gutterman in the top though - but it's lovely in the bobbin).

    Thread is certainly a voyage of discovery. It's a good idea to keeps notes as you go. I have a steno pad in my sewing room and I'm constantly making different notes in it, and using it as a scratch pad for some quick math.

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