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Thread: WHY are quilt bindings cut on the BIAS

  1. #26

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    I do not cut my bindings on the bias and have been quilting for 40 years. A straight grain cut is usually done.
    A bias cut binding is only necessary on a scalloped edged quilt
    where the binding needs to fit a rounded edge.

  2. #27
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidmona
    I read somewhere that the only time you need to cut binding on the bias is when you are going to be binding curves. Otherwise, you can straight cut the fabric width wise.
    I agree!

  3. #28
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan
    ...... I use bias if doing curves. On straight edges, I find that straight binding lays flatter with fewer waves.
    If i'm using bias binding - i pin it to keep it from stretching as i sew - this may be why it's not laying flat.

    I normally use straight grain because it's simpler. I do want to thank you ladies for this thread today, because i'm quilting a project that i'm going to curve the corners instead of squaring them off.

  4. #29
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    I learned that cutting on the bias for borders and bindings made the seam more difficult to see(?).

  5. #30
    Senior Member supergma's Avatar
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    All my binding is bias cut. Probably because "that was how MaMa did it". I do find that I can finish my binding more smoothly with bias. My granddaughter only uses straight cut binding, and her quilts are always beautiful. I'd say to do it however it works best for you.

  6. #31

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    I always cut a bias binding. The binding is stronger and easier to put on the quilt. I double fold 2 1/2 inch strips. I love the look of a striped binding cut on the bias. My mitered corners look much better with a bias binding.

  7. #32
    Super Member GramaLaura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gal288
    I only cut on the bias when I do a scallop edge,, otherwise on straight of grain.
    ME TOO!!

  8. #33
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryb119
    The only time I cut my binding on the bias is when I am binding a curve or if i want to use a stripe or plaid and have the bias look. I use a straight width of fabric cut for straight edges.
    Ditto! It's much easier and takes less time to cut bindings cross grain, and while I think it sounds theoretically probable that bias bindings are stronger, I haven't seen sufficient proof of it to make me take the extra fabric/trouble to make my bindings on the bias.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyblue
    Quote Originally Posted by maryb119
    The only time I cut my binding on the bias is when I am binding a curve or if i want to use a stripe or plaid and have the bias look. I use a straight width of fabric cut for straight edges.
    Ditto! It's much easier and takes less time to cut bindings cross grain, and while I think it sounds theoretically probable that bias bindings are stronger, I haven't seen sufficient proof of it to make me take the extra fabric/trouble to make my bindings on the bias.
    ROFL. This is what I told Dreamer2009 on the phone. I never even thought about it. Now I have some food for thought from everyone. Guess like my old saying "if it's not broke, don't fix it" and I've never had problems. (Snicker) :lol:

  10. #35
    Senior Member bigdogmom's Avatar
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    I agree with doing bias for curved edges, but I usually use straight grain for straight edge quilts or wall hangings. I have heard bias is stronger and for quilts with a lot of use that is important.

  11. #36
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    I always cut on the bias. I found it easier to turn on straight edge and curved edged quilts. Just a preference.
    D in TX

  12. #37

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    If a quilt is washed often, a bias cut binding seems to last longer. Especially on a baby quilt that is washed often.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    Here's a blog post that explains the differences between bias and straight of grain binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/01...cs-part-1.html

    and here's part 2 where she shows how to make bias binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/02...rt-2-bias.html

    I am going to try making my next quilt with rounded corners and use bias binding. I don't really like mitering corners.
    Just watched both of these tutorials and thank you so much. I never understood why you should cut your binding on the bias. She makes perfect sense. This was great; thanks again.
    Diane in Garnet Valley, PA

  14. #39
    Junior Member countryone77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyblue
    Ditto! It's much easier and takes less time to cut bindings cross grain, and while I think it sounds theoretically probable that bias bindings are stronger, I haven't seen sufficient proof of it to make me take the extra fabric/trouble to make my bindings on the bias.
    The "theory" is that if you cut your binding cross grain, then you would have a single thread on the edge, for the entire length that you cut. However, I doubt that my binding is cut so cleanly cross grain across the entire width of fabric for that to be true. So, my cross cut binding may be a "little" weaker than bias cut binding, but not enough to make a big difference for my quilts, which are not heirlooms.

  15. #40
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    Thanks for linking to my tutorials! As I've said on my blog many times, my goal is to provide as much information as possible so everyone can make the decision that works best for them.

    -Julie

    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    Here's a blog post that explains the differences between bias and straight of grain binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/01...cs-part-1.html

    and here's part 2 where she shows how to make bias binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/02...rt-2-bias.html

    I am going to try making my next quilt with rounded corners and use bias binding. I don't really like mitering corners.

  16. #41
    Super Member sharoney's Avatar
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    I remember reading that bias bindings last longer because there are many threads taking wear instead of just one. However, on straight quilts, I always do straight, double-fold, hand sewn bindings with mitered corners.

  17. #42
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    Whichever you want is find. I personally feel that bias binding is stronger, will last longer. I prefer bias on all my quilts, just because I can stitch it on with no puckers.

  18. #43
    Power Poster dreamer2009's Avatar
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    wow everyone has been so helpful :)
    Thanks

  19. #44
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    I read somewhere that the availability of commercially made bias tape in the 1930s led to the popularity of scalloped-edge quilts. Then, when quilting "died out, almost!" everyone in the 19702 just though binding had to be bias. Harriet Hargraves put me straight--not to be punny!

  20. #45
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    The cross grain of fabric has more give than the straight grain so bias binding is easier to apply on the cross grain side. For me that equals less hassel trying to get it on with no puckers or pleats.

  21. #46
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    Me too. It does wear better on much used/washed quilts.

  22. #47
    Super Member grandjan's Avatar
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    I use straight-grain French fold binding routinely unless I'm doing a curve somewhere on the binding. You need the give of bias if you are manipulating the fabric around a curve, otherwise, it's really easier and more economical to just cut the binding on the straight grain.

  23. #48
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    yes, that is what I heard also.

  24. #49
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    I use straight binding on straight edges of quilts, and bias when my border has curves. I cut strips 2 1/4" press in half lengthwise. Put raw edges to raw edge of quilt and stitch to the right side of the quilt, then hand finish on the back.

  25. #50
    Super Member jayelee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    Quote Originally Posted by dreamer2009
    Can someone explain this to me please...
    They are only cut on the bias if you have curves or a scalloped border. Otherwise they can be cut on the straight of the grain. I've NEVER cut bias strips. As a matter of fact, the one time I did a scallopped border, I went out and bought pre-made bias strips and used those.
    DITTO

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