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Thread: Great Grandmother quilt 1930's

  1. #1
    AbbyQuilts's Avatar
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    here are the pics for my great grandmothers quilt.
    I am unsure if I should try and fix it or just try and preserve it as it is



    the back is all rotting it just fall apart
    Name:  Attachment-43128.jpe
Views: 60
Size:  23.5 KB

    here is one of the fabrics that is rotting
    Name:  Attachment-43165.jpe
Views: 64
Size:  39.3 KB

    the quilt
    Made of Domino sugar bags, feed sacks, and my grandmothers elementary school dresses
    Name:  Attachment-43178.jpe
Views: 60
Size:  35.8 KB

  2. #2
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    I can't tell from the photos whether it was quilted or tied.If tied, it will be a lot easier to repair. It will be a big job, but you're preserving history.

  3. #3
    AbbyQuilts's Avatar
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    it is "quilted" see that single straight line stitch running through the block on the second pic

    there is one on every block but only on the block
    (my family wasnt known for their quilting but they were poor and practical lol)

  4. #4
    kd124's Avatar
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    I don't know the best thing to do, but just wanted to say it is an awesome quilt.

  5. #5
    Power Poster SulaBug's Avatar
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    You certainly have a fantastic
    treasure, in your Great Grand
    Mother's quilt!! :D I am not sure
    what I would do with it, other
    than love it to piece's!!
    :D :D :D :D :D

  6. #6
    Super Member NorBanaquilts's Avatar
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    Sorry I can't help, but what a treasure

  7. #7
    Super Member Quilt4u's Avatar
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    You sure have a wonderful quilt there. Do you have a Quilt Museum or a Quilt Restoration Center? If not look on line. They can tell you how to restore it or to perserve it so nomore damage will happen to it.

  8. #8
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    I think I would try to repair it...........and then I would put it on a bed so I could see it everyday! :D

  9. #9
    Super Member kwhite's Avatar
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    Since it is so simply "quilted" I would be all over taking that apart and repairing it and properly quilting it. It is lovely.

  10. #10
    Super Member Chele's Avatar
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    What a treasure! I love all the different fabrics and feed sacks. Good luck restoring that beauty!

  11. #11
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    What a wonderful family heirloom you have and how great that you want to preserve it.

    When we lived in Virginia I was able to go to some of the DC area museums and see quite a few VERY old quilts. Some were missing large sections where the fabric had disintegrated. I looked at them very carefully to see what they had done to the quilts to save them from further damage.

    What I noticed was tulle "netting". (I am not sure where you would buy it, but it would need to be acid free.) The netting was placed over the damaged area and then stitched around the edge and also tacked in the center if the repair area was large. You had to get VERY close to the quilt to even see the netting.

    You will also need some good quality muslin for other areas.

    Here are a few articles on antique quilt repair that may help you

    http://www.quilthistory.com/repair.htm
    http://www.annquilts.com/quiltrepair.html
    http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...sy.html?cat=24
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/a...ojid=c00480758

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I would take it apart and repair it. you can find repro fabrics of the 30' and replace what needs to be. then use muslim for the back and new batting. It is worth saving,.

  13. #13
    AbbyQuilts's Avatar
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    I went to the LQS today and I found a 1930's repo print I like and i think will go well.
    It doesn't match the one that I will be replacing but it goes well over all.

    I just dont know if I can bring myself to do it.
    I am a new quilter so I dont want to mess it up for one
    Plus it is so discolored from age the new fabrics look funny up against it

    hmm I am in quite a dilemma
    any suggestions

  14. #14
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    you might try washing the new fabrics a few times,to get the new look gone from them.

  15. #15
    quiltluvr's Avatar
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    Or let the new fabrics set in direct sun for several days, perhaps that will help with some fading issues.

  16. #16
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcia
    What a wonderful family heirloom you have and how great that you want to preserve it.

    When we lived in Virginia I was able to go to some of the DC area museums and see quite a few VERY old quilts. Some were missing large sections where the fabric had disintegrated. I looked at them very carefully to see what they had done to the quilts to save them from further damage.

    What I noticed was tulle "netting". (I am not sure where you would buy it, but it would need to be acid free.) The netting was placed over the damaged area and then stitched around the edge and also tacked in the center if the repair area was large. You had to get VERY close to the quilt to even see the netting.

    You will also need some good quality muslin for other areas.

    Here are a few articles on antique quilt repair that may help you

    http://www.quilthistory.com/repair.htm
    http://www.annquilts.com/quiltrepair.html
    http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...sy.html?cat=24
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/a...ojid=c00480758

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    Some of the museums and stately homes in the UK support old fabrics, curtains etc. with bridal veiling. It's finer than ordinary netting. Try a fabric shop that specialises in bridal fabrics.

  17. #17
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I think it would be wonderful to restore it and either hang it or put it on a bed to display it. It is a treasure.

  18. #18
    Sara Street's Avatar
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    I wouldn't touch it until you talk to a quilt conservator that knows their stuff!

    It is beautiful 'as it', but you don't want it to deteriorate any further...

    Good luck!
    Sara

  19. #19
    Super Member Mamaskeeto's Avatar
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    What a treasure you have there.

  20. #20
    Senior Member BettyB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbbyQuilts
    here are the pics for my great grandmothers quilt.
    I am unsure if I should try and fix it or just try and preserve it as it is
    I do not have a feed sack that matches that torn piece. But, I will tell you that I restored one that was in worse shape than that. My grandmother gave my son a quilt in 1970 that she had made long before that. He used it and an offwhite piece deteriated in several places. It was lined with feedsacks that had choo choo trains on it. I took it apart and put new pieces in and a new lining. I saved part of the back with a train on it and wrote the history of the quilt. It is now back in Italy with my son.

  21. #21
    Super Member needles3thread's Avatar
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    Not sure, but what about adding a small amount of bleach to
    the wash water of the reproduction fabric.
    It might make the new fabric look somewhat faded like the rest
    of them.

  22. #22
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    requilt I think you may even consider going around each section with small applique stitch to make sure any more dont start raveling and peeling off also if you are not comfortable doing the requilting yourself ask around the churches in your area most have quilt quilds and take on projects like yours also they may even have material you could use i think one of the churches here does it and prices are very reasonable they were going to hand quilt a queen size for 125!!! i have seen their work and its fantastic good luck please post pictures when done

  23. #23
    Super Member Rainbow's Avatar
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    Good luck....Just bringing it out must bring you joy.

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