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Cake Flour or Regular?

Cake Flour or Regular?

Old 10-20-2014, 05:30 AM
  #11  
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My cream cheese pound cake recipe calls for cake flour. But unless a recipe calls for it, I would not use it. Maybe the cream cheese pound cake needs a lighter flour. I say it is butter, cream cheese, sugar, and eggs with just enough flour to hold them together. It is a yummy cake, so I rarely make it as I can't leave it alone if it is in my house!
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:48 AM
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While involved in something corn starchy I read the "Cook's Tips" part of the label on the large (35 oz.) can of Argo Corn Starch. Some wonderful Home Ec. teacher, long since gone to her reward, told us that one could make their own cake flour. Lo and behold, Argo has the recipe printed on the can.

And I quote, "For 1 cup Cake Flour combine 3/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour with 2 Tbsp. Argo Corn Starch."

PLEASE NOTE that I have never done this and cannot vouch for success BUT it has come to my attention that what is printed on the label of a food related product is usually successful. Thinking about it, printing something incorrect or failing on your label would be counter productive to sales.

Silly story. My family has been using a fruitcake recipe for generations. Three generations of us have made the recipe - same EXACT bag of flour and other ingredients as well as oven. My grandmother and mother baked fruitcake that was dense and the fruit was at the bottom of their loaves. Mine was light (angelfood-ish), fluffy, and the fruit was throughout the loaf. We could not figure it out but it happenned time after time. We checked as many variables as we could think of: how I used the mixer, temperature of ingredients, etc. Every fruitcake I baked was fluffy fruitcake with fruit throughout. Theirs weren't. (Note: fruitcake was a big deal in the family. The joke, until I came along, was the fruit on the bottom.) No mystery any longer. I am the only one left.) We never solved the problem.

Thanks for being patient with the digression.

Pat
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Old 10-20-2014, 07:13 AM
  #13  
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I only use regular unbleached flour in all my cakes.
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Old 10-20-2014, 07:57 AM
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I think you make up some samples and let me test them for you....
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Old 10-20-2014, 01:51 PM
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Thanks guys! I'll keep you posted.
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Old 10-20-2014, 02:04 PM
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Do you share your fruit cake recipe?
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Old 10-21-2014, 04:33 AM
  #17  
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Apology first. I am having a horrible time learning how the mechanics of the board work. I can't even stay logged in for more than one addition to a thread. Please forgive me for sticking this in here ut I've struggled with other choices for about a half hour. No go. But I CAN nake this happen.

I am delighted and highly flattered that anyone would be interested in sharing the supposed to be a brick fruitcake recipe. Please contact me (I know I am the only one who cannot figure out how to do that.) It will be forthcoming.

Pat
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Old 10-21-2014, 06:25 AM
  #18  
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This is a timely post for me. I made my pound cake recipe the same as always. The old Better Homes and Garden cook book. It always turned out fine except this time. It was so dry it couldn't be eaten alone. I am going to end up making a recipe I found on line for a breadtype pudding only with cake.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:01 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
It's a pretty complicated issue, I guess. Since King Arthur Flour is pretty much all I buy, I checked their blogs to learn more about a cake flour vs. regular. You can read all about it here: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/...of-cake-flour/ They discuss all the pros and cons for pound cake, etc. Good luck. I don't think I've bought cake flour in years, but what probably matters is the recipe you use. I think you can get good pound cake recipes on King Arthur's site and see what you prefer. Happy baking!
I have to say that I hadn't use King Arthur Flour until a few years ago - must say I am glad I made the change - I have never seen it on sale like the other flours but I no longer buy any other brand.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:33 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by w1613s View Post
While involved in something corn starchy I read the "Cook's Tips" part of the label on the large (35 oz.) can of Argo Corn Starch. Some wonderful Home Ec. teacher, long since gone to her reward, told us that one could make their own cake flour. Lo and behold, Argo has the recipe printed on the can.

And I quote, "For 1 cup Cake Flour combine 3/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour with 2 Tbsp. Argo Corn Starch."

PLEASE NOTE that I have never done this and cannot vouch for success BUT it has come to my attention that what is printed on the label of a food related product is usually successful. Thinking about it, printing something incorrect or failing on your label would be counter productive to sales.

Silly story. My family has been using a fruitcake recipe for generations. Three generations of us have made the recipe - same EXACT bag of flour and other ingredients as well as oven. My grandmother and mother baked fruitcake that was dense and the fruit was at the bottom of their loaves. Mine was light (angelfood-ish), fluffy, and the fruit was throughout the loaf. We could not figure it out but it happenned time after time. We checked as many variables as we could think of: how I used the mixer, temperature of ingredients, etc. Every fruitcake I baked was fluffy fruitcake with fruit throughout. Theirs weren't. (Note: fruitcake was a big deal in the family. The joke, until I came along, was the fruit on the bottom.) No mystery any longer. I am the only one left.) We never solved the problem.

Thanks for being patient with the digression.

Pat
All other factors being the same, I'm wondering about the method of mixing the cakes. The more dough is worked (after the liquid is added to the dry ingredients), the more gluten is released and the heavier the end product will be. A heavier cake would prevent the fruit from rising evenly. Just a thought.
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