Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Recipes
Question about yeast in breadmaking >

Question about yeast in breadmaking

Question about yeast in breadmaking

Old 09-30-2021, 02:42 PM
  #1  
Power Poster
Thread Starter
 
SusieQOH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 13,117
Default Question about yeast in breadmaking

I made a loaf today from a website called Ciao Florentina (great website)
and she said to add yeast to the flour and salt. Then add the water and mix.
I did that and it didn't rise right.
The bread tasted good even though it didn't rise as it should have.
I thought of a couple of things but maybe someone else can help:
I usually put the yeast in warm water and also the yeast wasn't expired but maybe it was a dud.

When you put it in the oven she said to put a pan of water below the bread and that's what makes the crust nice
and crusty. It was.

Why am I so intent on making bread???? That's the last thing I need
The truth is- the bakery where we bought wonderful Italian bread closed and the kind they make at Whole Foods doesn't come close.

Any other ideas?
Tia

Last edited by SusieQOH; 09-30-2021 at 02:44 PM.
SusieQOH is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 02:58 PM
  #2  
Super Member
 
tallchick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,826
Default

Did it just not rise? Or not rise enough? There is regular yeast and instant yeast, here is some info.

https://www.marthastewart.com/779699...pid-rise-yeast

I loved baking, bread is my kryptonite! I generally had no issues with the rapid rise yeast and always made sure to proof the regular one in the packets.
Many factors in bread making, humidity, the type of flour, yeast, liquid temperature, etc. When baking bread it is always better to weigh the ingredients. Perhaps you did get a dud, I have had that happen a few times.
tallchick is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 03:17 PM
  #3  
Super Member
 
GingerK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,927
Default

Yes, I think you should have used instant rising yeast if it is supposed to go in with the dry ingredients. But you can modify any yeast recipe for regular yeast. Just take some of the liquid, add a bit of sugar and the yeast, let it foam and add with the other liquid.
GingerK is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 04:48 PM
  #4  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 39,893
Default

I always proof my yeast to start. I do the warm water with a bit of sugar in it and sprinkle the yeast in. Once it foams up good I add my other ingredients. I figure if the yeast doesn’t proof well why waste all the other ingredients.
Tartan is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 05:34 PM
  #5  
Power Poster
Thread Starter
 
SusieQOH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 13,117
Default

It did rise, but not enough.
You know, I always buy rapid rise but this one wasn't. Maybe I picked up the wrong one or my husband bought it. I only checked the date and then put it in the flour and salt mixture.
Great tips from all of you, thanks.
I could live on bread!
SusieQOH is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 06:10 PM
  #6  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 266
Default

I always rehydrate the yeast separately, no matter what kind of yeast. That way the yeast is awake and ready to go. If you mix it into the flour then add water, it is competing with the flour for hydration.
janiebakes is offline  
Old 09-30-2021, 09:48 PM
  #7  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,742
Default

I agree that yeast should go in the warm, wet ingredients. I don't buy RapidRise. I like the regular better. I made English Muffin bread yesterday. So easy and makes such good toast.
Irishrose2 is offline  
Old 10-01-2021, 02:16 AM
  #8  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 100
Default

I guess I'm a little different about my bread baking. I rarely proof my yeast & I do not put it in contact with salt until I am adding it to the flour in the mixer bowl. I don't know if it is true, but I read that salt will retard the yeast rise, so I add salt at the last moment possible. I bake a lot of bread so I keep a lot of yeast in the freezer & as long as it is well sealed, it doesn't lose potency for use.
As for the water in the pan- make sure you tuck your loaf into the oven & immediately put about 1.5cups of boiling water in your pan & shut the oven door quickly. Wait about 3-5 minutes & then lightly spray your loaf (do not spray your oven light!) again & close the door. That will help 'crisp' up your crust. King Arthur Flour has great info if you go to their website. Don't forget to look at their recipes too!
Have fun baking
sewverybusy1
sewverybusy1 is offline  
Old 10-01-2021, 02:37 AM
  #9  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,772
Default

Originally Posted by sewverybusy1 View Post
I guess I'm a little different about my bread baking. I rarely proof my yeast & I do not put it in contact with salt until I am adding it to the flour in the mixer bowl. I don't know if it is true, but I read that salt will retard the yeast rise, so I add salt at the last moment possible.
I agree! I usually use my bread machine now, but I don't let my yeast directly touch the salt. A little sugar helps the rise, too.
Mkotch is offline  
Old 10-01-2021, 04:02 AM
  #10  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southern USA
Posts: 13,689
Default

I make all our bread and have been for years. Salt and yeast do not like each other. I always add my salt last . I add yeast to warm water and always check the temp of the water, 110 degrees for active dry yeast, proofed in water or 120 degrees if added to flour. Too warm of water will kill the yeast. Too cool and it won't wake up and will hinder the gluten formation.
I buy yeast by the lb package and freeze it. I keep a small container of it in the cabinet. The more you bake with yeast the more good spores will be in your kitchen that help a lot when bead making.

My bread recipe is simple. Flour water yeast and salt. This is perfect French bread dough I use steam pans to bake. The crust is crackly. For sandwich bread I add 1/4 cup of oil and reduce the water. Even after years of baking I will have a flop now and then. I make bread crumbs and forget it.
Onebyone is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.