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Thread: Quilt As You Go that Deb uses

  1. #1
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    I found this method on the web, so it isn't my own method, but I find it to be the easiest I have come across. Craftybear asked me to post this.

    Open the blocks up, press well. With the 1" 'tags', fold the edge of the backing to the edge of the block, then fold over again on to the block itself. Top stitch down each respective side. I used matching threads for all of my block tops and backing. With this method, I was able to create another block design with the backing. The blue was on the corners, I did white diamond shape then in the middle a different fabric. I did one row at a time, then attached the rows the same way. This will also give you a sashing in between each block. Binding done in your own method.
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    The backing is 15" square, the batting is 13" square and the block itself is 12-1/2" square. Backing is right side down, batting block right side up. I stippled the blocks used in this tutorial. You could SID if you wish.
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    Here I tuck back the backing, as not to cut it (I did this once) as I trim the batting to match the block size.
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    Now I trim the backing to 1" width. Be careful not to cut the backing to the block top. ( I did this once as well!) The top and the batting should be 12-1/2" square, and the backing 1" larger all around.
    Name:  Attachment-82852.jpe
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    Since the blocks are same size, put the blocks with backings right sides together and sew right along the top block edge. This will give you 1" from the block edge to the backing edge. The blocks will meet together very nicely.
    Name:  Attachment-82853.jpe
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  2. #2
    Super Member roseOfsharon's Avatar
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    I saw this at the quilt show (demo) love the block btw :)

  3. #3
    Senior Member magnolia's Avatar
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    How do you put the blocks together when you are ready to complete the quilt?

    oops. Guess I posted that too soon. I'm still not sure I understand how to join the blocks.

  4. #4
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    Thanks I will try it. Thanks again for the tutorial.

  5. #5
    Senior Member sewaholic's Avatar
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    Looks a good way to do it. I love your " I did that once " comments.

  6. #6
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting. I am having trouble understanding the 'Fold the edge of the backing to the edge of the back then fold again onto the block itself' part. I can see how you could place the overlap at at edge of your left block under your right block, but if you have seen down the edge what do you do with the overlap from the right block's backing? how does it work on the top? Is the overlap from the backing brought to the front and if so how can the batting sit flat? I am probably missing something :blush:

  7. #7
    Super Member CAROLJ's Avatar
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    thanks

  8. #8
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Ah-ha! Now that I am looking at the photos on a larger screen, I can see that I misunderstood- you don't overlap the backing with the adjacent block but you use it to bind its own block.

    But I still dont understand how you attach the blocks to each other and make the quilt fall nicely when used?

  9. #9
    Junior Member Newby0709's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie
    Ah-ha! Now that I am looking at the photos on a larger screen, I can see that I misunderstood- you don't overlap the backing with the adjacent block but you use it to bind its own block.

    But I still dont understand how you attach the blocks to each other and make the quilt fall nicely when used?
    Perhaps this video link will make it clear.
    https://www.baysidequilting.com/store/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=284]https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284[/url]

  10. #10
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    It's something I'm going to try.

  11. #11
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    this is actually the Betty Cotton Theory. YOu can get one of her books to get more photos and details if you need some.

  12. #12
    RMM
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    Deb....I've been wanting to make a QAYG and now I "think" I can do it. Your instructions w/pics are great...thanks
    RMM

  13. #13
    Super Member franie's Avatar
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    A couple of my friends do their quilts this way. I just don't care for quilts looking that flat. I prefer a real quilt put together in pieces quilted and bound--just my preference. I would like to see more pics of what has been done with this method--same for Cotton Theory--but just not my cup of tea.

  14. #14
    Power Poster ann clare's Avatar
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    That is brilliant. Not having to work on a large area is very encouraging. Thanks for sharing.

  15. #15
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    What a great tute. Thanks for sharing.

  16. #16
    Junior Member Newby0709's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by franie
    A couple of my friends do their quilts this way. I just don't care for quilts looking that flat. I prefer a real quilt put together in pieces quilted and bound--just my preference. I would like to see more pics of what has been done with this method--same for Cotton Theory--but just not my cup of tea.
    here's a link for Attic Windows done with the Cotton Theory
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-28801-1.htm
    and the attachment is one I used the Fun and Done QAYG method (I forgot to take the pillows off before I took the picture). I know others have better quilting skills as well as better photography skills but these are mine.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    I have been reading the other posts on cotton theory, and that is not what I am doing. I am not making my blocks in little strip pieces and quilting each section as I go. I make one 12-1/2 block, as I usually do, then quilt that entire block. I can see why those blocks would be stiff. Mine are no stiffer than if I were to put all the block tops together and do the stippling all over. There isn't any special ruler - as I have been reading about - that is used. I don't insert 1 or 2" sashings between each block, the backing becomes the sashing.....I can see why seams would be a little wonky and messy looking.....Am I missing something????

  18. #18
    Junior Member lucylockett's Avatar
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    Deb, I did echo quilting around each block of a SBS and joined them together as you did. It took a whole lot of work out of the the entire quilting process. Plus the binding was already in place on the outer blocks and I didn't have to cut and sew it on separately. Could you take a picture of the back of one of your quilts to show how pretty it all turns out? The front of my quilt looked the same as if it had been done in a traditional way with sashings. It is a nice option and worth giving a try! Especially for those of us w/o a long arm machine!

  19. #19
    Senior Member magnolia's Avatar
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    Another quick question. Can you add outside borders to these quilts or would you do that using this method, but longer pieces? Thanks

  20. #20
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    I appreciate the way you explained it and the photos help me.

  21. #21
    Super Member JudyG's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tutorial, Deb. I like the way you do this and will try it when I put together my quilt from one of the block swaps. One question, I am assuming that you really pay attention to picking out your backing fabric as that is going to become part of the front of your quilt. Is that correct, or am I misinterpreting how this goes together? I think I get it, but until I actually do it hands on, may not have gotten it exactly.

  22. #22
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    Judy, you are correct in really thinking the color for the backing, as it IS the sashings between the front blocks. However, for the outside edges, I DO a separate binding strip, just like I would normally do on any other quilt. I will post a pic of the quilt when I get the binding done. Depending on the size and number of blocks used, you really can have a reversable quilt. How cute for a kid!

  23. #23
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia
    Another quick question. Can you add outside borders to these quilts or would you do that using this method, but longer pieces? Thanks
    When your quilt is all assembled, you certainly could add outside borders, just as you normally would on any quilt that you are making. I will post pics when I get the binding done, maybe that will give a better overall picture. (no pun intended)

  24. #24
    DJ
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    I have some blocks that would be great to try with this technique. Someone asked about adding borders. I'm thinking I could add borders in pieces to the blocks that will be outside before I quilt those blocks. Then proceed as usual, but the borders would have to be the same fabric as the backing. Any other ideas here?

  25. #25
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    If it is outside borders, they can be any color you wish. The inside 'sashings or borders' are the backing fabric. I had better hurry up and finish the one that started all this so you can see how it will be when finished. Headed to the gazebo - yep, brought the machine and fabric and everything so I can be outside and enjoy nature and sewing!

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