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Why do sewing machine manufacturers quit making parts for older machines?

Why do sewing machine manufacturers quit making parts for older machines?

Old 08-29-2018, 08:22 AM
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Default Why do sewing machine manufacturers quit making parts for older machines?

I understand that companies want to sell "new" products.

However - I am more apt to buy from a company that will stand behind their products for years and years - "If the model I bought in 1980 is still running strong (and I can get it fixed if necessary) - I am much more apt to be interested in the machines available now."

If whatever is obsolete in five years or less - and not repairable - why would I want to bother with it?
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Old 08-29-2018, 09:19 AM
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I'm dealing with that right now. I need the embroidery Q foot for a Brother PE400D. Two years ago the foot was still available at several places. Now that I need one, it's not available any more, nobody has one. My dealer even had their warehouse guy check all over the country, no luck.

Cari
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Old 08-29-2018, 09:40 AM
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Planned obsolescence. The car industry has been doing it for years. They are not required to make parts for vehicles that are more than 10 years old. If the vehicle isn't popular enough to have an after market, you're out of luck. My husband has a 3 year old Chevy SS. It was made in Australia in some type of deal with Holden (Australian auto maker). Evidently, they didn't renew the contract and Holden is no longer making parts for GM for the cars. You can get some Holden parts that are interchangeable but you have to know what you're doing to do that. As I hear it, warranty work is almost non existent at present because GM doesn't have parts. Its really awful.
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Old 08-29-2018, 09:43 AM
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We are never happy with what we have. The commercial rat race is fed by an endless cycle of new technology, innovation, renewal, production, sales, income, food on the table, wealth,... I guess it's up to the individual and what it decides on, but generally we tend to be subject to the larger scheeme of things. At the top of the chain some accumulate wealth and riches, while others are forced to spend the little they have.

In a 5 to 10 year period new and improved features will be available, you might even have a phone app reminding you of settings and sorting out details on your latest projects. I know some will go for it, even if it turns out to be a short lived fad.

Somethings have to push things forward, and we are all pressured to be subjects to it. We would not have new sewing machines made if not. On the other hand, production adjusts to people's needs and what they ask for. We could always ask for better quality. It's just that some of us still like an old cast iron straight stitcher ;- ) If the demand is large enough there will be after marked replacements, or we are left to deal with it on our own. It costs too keep up service and production of things, there has to be a profit on everything to be worth it. I don't think anyone would bother repairing and keeping up flimsily made models. Some brands keep up availablility of accessories longer than others, I can still by new Bernina feet for a 730 record, but I guess not all can be found new. Hunting down used and vintage isn't too bad either.

On fleabay anything can turn up.

Last edited by Mickey2; 08-29-2018 at 10:00 AM.
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Old 08-29-2018, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
I'm dealing with that right now. I need the embroidery Q foot for a Brother PE400D. Two years ago the foot was still available at several places. Now that I need one, it's not available any more, nobody has one. My dealer even had their warehouse guy check all over the country, no luck.

Cari
Is this the part for your machine? You might try calling them directly as it shows no longer available.

https://www.sewingpartsonline.com/em...xa5357001.aspx

However! Look here. It may be they have one for you.

http://www.mysewingmachineparts.com/...57001-brother/

Here too is another option.

https://www.allbrands.com/products/8...idery-foot-for

If these sites are failures send me a pm and I will check with our local dealer for you.

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Old 08-29-2018, 02:09 PM
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Thank you Rhonda! I just ordered one. I should have ordered it when I first got the machine, it would have cost me half of what I just paid. But since I saw it everywhere I figured it would still be available when I got around to needing it. I know better than to assume that, don't know what made me think it.

Cari
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Old 08-29-2018, 05:05 PM
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It's a marketing thing. However, you can still get lots of parts for the older Berninas. I understand the the Viking / Husqvarna / Pfaff become obsolete quickly. What machine are you working with?
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Old 08-30-2018, 04:44 AM
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Parts for older machines cost moneyto buy and then space to store. They are a dead weight on a business's bottom line as some of those parts may sit for years. Businesses have slim margins and have to decide what will make them the most money so they can survive. So when I get a new machine, I buy as many of the accessories as I can afford, because I know they will not always be available.
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Old 08-30-2018, 07:07 AM
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I wonder if 3D printers may end up helping our hobby greatly. cooopah has some wise words.
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Old 08-30-2018, 01:40 PM
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3D printers might help you get a replacement part, but only if you have the part you need intact or drawings of it. Also, contrary to what you see on TV, 3D printing is pretty expensive. More so the denser and larger the piece you need. My husband had an custom console he designed done for his car. Cost a fortune. I believe they only do plastics with them so it would be no good for metal parts.
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