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Thread: 1900-ish Mundlos & Co handcrank rescue!

  1. #1
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    1900-ish Mundlos & Co handcrank rescue!

    Hey gang, check this out! My poor neglected new friend. Mind you, I'm fairly sure of the date from my research and that I've correctly ID'd the machine from here: http://www.sewmuse.co.uk/Mundlos.htm

    Of course, it was advertised as an "old Singer" and I was looking for something to completely restore. It's got me thinking about the difference between the patina that comes with age and use and the rather different looking effects of neglect. What are your thoughts on this? Would you make the same distinction? - very interested to know!

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    Anyway, first things first, have to get it cleaned and working. Fascinating machine! I could not have been more surprised when I tried to remove the 'face plate' and THIS happened!

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    Wow! Worth the $40 just to check out the way it's put together. In case anyone's shocked and thinks I paid too much, I had one of those great picker-style experiences meeting this fantastic guy who was a bird breeder and had been to Africa working with Gorillas and all sorts of amazing stuff. My 2 year old had the most amazing time checking out all the birds and all in all, I was in a kindly mood Also, hand cranks are not so easy to get for under $100.

    I've only got one issue so far and it's (probably) minor. The hinges are fastened into the box base with a square nut and then a domed something-or-other holding the nut in place. It's recessed into the hole so it's hard to get any kind of tool in there; plus I don't know if I'm trying to undo the domed thing or just go straight for the square nut. Has anyone else seen this kind of set-up? SteveH? Would be grateful for any tips on what tool(s) to use. TIA!

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    Happy to add more pics of this machine if people are interested
    Last edited by frudemoo; 02-11-2014 at 02:16 PM.

  2. #2
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    This machine looks very much like the old White machines.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I use needle nose type pliers to get those kind of bolts out. Looks like a fun project. Sometimes I buy and pay more than I normally would if I think I'll learn something new from it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I use needle nose type pliers to get those kind of bolts out. Looks like a fun project. Sometimes I buy and pay more than I normally would if I think I'll learn something new from it.
    Yeah, I think that's what I was thinking Candace. I couldn't find my needle nose pliers when I had a go, come to think of it. Do you think that little domed top unscrews first?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    This machine looks very much like the old White machines.
    White machines are pretty rare in Australia from what I can tell Glenn. I have had my eye on an interesting old Eldredge that looks similar too, but the seller won't budge on the $275 price tag because that's what she paid for it. It's been available for about 2 years!! LOL. Somehow I have a feeling one day I'll buy it just because it's been calling to me for so long

  5. #5
    Senior Member GreyQ's Avatar
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    What a project! I love those little daises peeking through the grime. I bet a little sewing machine oil will reveal a beauty. In any case, you'll have a great learning experience and it will be a fantastic memory of how you got it.

  6. #6
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    they are awesome.

    I would use needlenose pliers. if you have an 8 pointed socket set you can use that too. (old sockets were 4 or 8 point modern ones are 6 or 12 point (square to hex bold changeover)

  7. #7
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I do not think you over paid at all. I think you will get your money's worth.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  8. #8
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyQ View Post
    What a project! I love those little daises peeking through the grime. I bet a little sewing machine oil will reveal a beauty. In any case, you'll have a great learning experience and it will be a fantastic memory of how you got it.
    Unfortunately not The only place the daisies were still intact was on the rear inspection plate. It was a bit of a tough call, but I've decided to repaint and will try and repaint the daisies by hand as practice. I think it's more important that someone loves this machine again. I'll do my bit and then I think I'll try and use it as bait to tempt one of my young nieces into sewing

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    they are awesome.

    I would use needlenose pliers.
    They worked! Found my jewellery pliers on the way out the door to the hardware. Was great because I could take the pieces separately to get what I needed

  9. #9
    Senior Member Pat M.'s Avatar
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    The insides look like my New Wilson. Maybe from the same company? Wilson was bought out by Singer in the early 1900's I think. Mine is finally working after many hours of cleaning it up. The shape of my machine is like yours.

  10. #10
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    That's a great find at $40! It has some neat features. The slotted thread holes look pretty advanced for the style of machine. The dirt and rust is from neglect, the rest just looks like wear from honest use. I don't think the machine was actively abused anyway. I don't see a top for the case so it would have been natural to grab it by the arm to carry it and the base just shows wear from use. I think it'll clean up quite nicely. It will look good (well used machine good) without repainting but the finish is at the point where I don't think it'll hurt anything if you do repaint it.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

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