Blonde finish cabinet repair

Old 08-17-2019, 09:23 PM
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Default Blonde finish cabinet repair

Anyone have any idea how tgese blonde finishes are put together or how to repair them?

20190817_221734.jpg

20190817_221842.jpg
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Old 08-18-2019, 01:33 PM
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I think it is just a thin blond veneer.
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Old 08-18-2019, 03:31 PM
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You would probably need to search for glaze techniques. Use a dry paint brush and drag the glaze over the painted surface. Practice on some sample pieces first. The results will be different depending on colors used and the amount of pressure used.

You may get a similar result using chalk paints too.
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Old 08-18-2019, 04:11 PM
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That is a lot better than

topaftermostpaperoff.jpg

and this is after I did some cleaning. I got most of the stuck on paper off, before I took this picture. I sprayed it with LA Awesome cleaner (from the Dollar Tree) and then used a plastic card to scrape at least some of the gunk off. The sides aren't as bad, but still not good.

I'll be watching this thread for something other than chalk paint.

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:08 PM
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Check out the videos how to here especially the one called barn-wood. I have used this brand of products with success.

https://generalfinishes.com/how-to-videos
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Old 08-20-2019, 06:05 PM
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It looks like it might be shellac, I would try denatured alcohol with a rag and see if the darker parts dissolve. If so, wipe the piece good to clean it and then apply shellac. I like to smooth between coats with some 0000 steel wool. Glenn has posted a lot of good info on here about finishes.
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Old 08-20-2019, 07:35 PM
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Lawdy, Janey, that's a mess for sure. Mine is mostly just vandals not using coasters like civilized people, lol. It does look like they used some kind of white whatever to fill in the pores of the wood.
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Old 08-20-2019, 09:43 PM
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Not likely to happen for mine, but probably what should be done is something like what is described at https://www.hunker.com/12308232/diy-...nd-wood-finish Not affiliated with off-site link


Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 08-21-2019, 06:53 AM
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I'm certainly no expert at this. However, if it were mine, I would sand it first and see what happens. It appears from the photo that part of the finish has dissolved and part hasn't. Sanding it would take off the high spots and leave the low ones. We know it's a veneer. With the open grain, it appears to be oak, probably white oak. Those edges have to be replaced with new pieces of veneer or filled in with some kind of filler that will blend in. If it's only on the edges and minimal, you can probably fudge it with a good wood putty (depends on how picky you are). Rockler is one place that has what you need to do this. If you can go to their store, they offer good advice as well.

Start with fairly fine sandpaper; I'd use an electric sander. Go easy and sand with the grain. Use a paint brush to brush off the sawdust so you can see how it's going as you do it. I would think stripping would be a last resort, depending on how well the veneer is adhered.

A quote from my Uncle Edwin: "Elmer's glue and sawdust has saved many a carpenter's reputation."

Janey, you'd have to really want that table to tackle that job. It's easier to find another one that isn't in such bad shape. Either sanding or stripping is the only thing that will help. The question is whether it's a good enough cabinet to be worth the effort.

bkay

Last edited by bkay; 08-21-2019 at 06:55 AM. Reason: grammar
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:24 AM
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Lol, bkay, I had completely forgotten that tiny veneer chip. I'm going to completely forget all about it. I do love that quote from your Uncle Edwin. I shared it with DH , who is a very accomplished woodworket/ carpenter and he said, "I've used sawdust and glue." He uses Titebond II, but there is a bottle of Elmer's on the glue shelf in the garage.
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