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Thread: Help Identifying Age/Maker of this Machine.

  1. #1
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    Help Identifying Age/Maker of this Machine.

    *waves*
    Hello,

    So i found this square sweetheart on the side of the road, not near any houses or people. AND it was about to rain. *gasp* seriously that thunderstorm lasted 3 hours. I suspect they didn't want it or didn't want to pay for repairs or something. Maybe she was forgotten. So i being the machine collector that i am nabbed it up with full intentions on getting her running and sending her on her way to a thrift store... *hangs head*

    I've become attached to her. *sighs* So now I have a mystery machine.

    First of all, there are dings on her, but someone painted it over with white paint. She's more cream. She had many problems, the least of which was that she was in need of a good oil. I had to re-time her hook because she was zigging but not zagging. So essentially all she did was stitch in a straight line.

    Imagine my surprise when i opened her up, aside from the usual bit of dust bunnies in the corner her insides were like new. It took me about 2 hours to time her correctly (first time doing that) I noticed her first needle guide is broken, there's dings in her paint. BUT she's a busty gal with a 1.3 Amp motor! *nods* seriously she has get up and go. i was tempted to pull it and switch it with the sickly/weak motor (.7 amp) of my Singer Fashionmate. LOL Alas i didn't.

    Once i got her going and threaded, I tested her buttons and gears and wow she's quickly becoming a favored machine. But i would love to know a bit more history about her. General stuff like who made her how old she is. I suspect mid 60's to early 80's based on the fact that like the Fashionmate she has a Plastic face. She has all metal gears. I found a similar machine named Elgin 4400f. This one is badged a Domestic 4400 made in Taiwan.

    Thanks!
    Imgur link: http://imgur.com/a/NQGfL for full album of pics.

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    Paint Dings covered in paint/white out?

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    bobbin holders?

  2. #2
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Probably from the 1980s+ all mechanical 'Domestic' is the name on it - I've seen other names on similar machines. White, New Home, Elgin and others. You might find a model number on the motor or the back of the machine. It sounds like you can make it sew. Just give it a good shot of Tri-flow on all the moving parts. I would prefer it to an electronic machine. Some time we should do a thread about that era machine. They are boxy, usually white with some cool color - very colorful stitch selection markers at the top and like you said built in bobbin holders or a box to hold attachments - not horrible machines but not Singer 401 either - usually can be had for not too much money and most aren't too heavy. Domestic was owned by White - maybe that is why I see similarities. Some of those machines have a button or lever or knob that made those decorative stitches go in reverse or do a different pattern so each pattern space gets you more stitch selection - kind of fun to fool around with. Yours is at D E and F - those do two different stitches. You have to set something else to get them to change though.
    Last edited by miriam; 07-13-2013 at 04:16 PM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  3. #3
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    Yes! Thank You! I saw another machine with the badged Elgin that looked very similar to this one. I ended up using that one's threading guide to figure out this one. So it could be related to a White sewing machine. That's very interesting. To get the DEF stitches you have to turn the stitch width to 5 (in the blurry pic with the domestic badge) then it will do them. I figured all I had to do was match up the blue line under the five to the blue little squares. LOL The same goes with the button hole (the red squares). It is significantly lighter than my older Kenmores. That being said i can hold it and lift it with one hand. haha. Thanks

  4. #4
    Super Member Mornigstar's Avatar
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    I bought a " Domestic " in 1964 --did lots of things other machines didn't do. Gave it to now ex dil and sorry I did as she never used it then she moved far away. Always wondered what happened to machine in cabinet too. Great find and hope you get yours working .

  5. #5
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    I bought this exact machine in 1984 from a local sewing machine dealer. Mine is labeled on the front "Universal", but on the bottom it says Standard Sewing Machine Corp., made in Taiwan, and the Model is 4400. I've used it for years without problem and you're right, the motor will power through all kinds of things my electronic sewing machines won't. Sadly, the tension unit has given out on it, and I'm not sure where to even begin looking for a new one. Your post here is the first post I've seen with my exact machine in it.

  6. #6
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Tension can be repaired or replaced. Check sew classic. By the way did it break or what?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  7. #7
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    It looks a bit like the 800 numers Berninas from the 1970s too, which where made and sold a bit into the 80s. The push button revese and stitch dials are a bit like the 1970s Husqvarnas. Some makers kept their models much the same for well over a decade, with minor changes. If the gears are all metal, or even mostly metal you have a nice machine worth sorting out.

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