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Help with identifying, please??

Help with identifying, please??

Old 06-06-2019, 01:48 PM
  #11  
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Aha, Janey! Hope this link works, but what do you think? The "cabinet"/base looks close, too, from what I can see (you have to arrow back one page):

https://www.flickr.com/photos/989578...7650260343821/

Last edited by JoneB; 06-06-2019 at 01:50 PM. Reason: fixed typo
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Old 06-06-2019, 03:20 PM
  #12  
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Cathy, what do you mean by a "high armed machine"?

Janey, am I imagining it from the photos online or is the Improved Family a regular sized machine and the Improved Manufacturing has a wider throat, more like an industrial? http://needlebar.org/cm/displayimage.php?pid=65
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Old 06-06-2019, 03:35 PM
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This mystery machine measures 14 1/4" x 7 1/8" - if that is of any help! (I didn't know what "high armed machine" refers to, either..but I'm really pretty new at this..)
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Old 06-06-2019, 06:30 PM
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I just don't know. I was making an observation about the belt in relationship to the hand wheel. According to ISMACS (note: this is an acroynym) and maybe needlebar seem to indicate that the Improved Manufacturing would be larger. I think there were some crossovers at least by 1908 that some 15 class machines were used in manufacturing. I also found a 16K class machine that was smaller, but was a chain stitch.

I found the 1883 patent that includes the pressure regulator in the arm at http://patentimages.storage.googleap...s/US274359.pdf

According to my notes, https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollec...1775/index.htm was from 1884 I also found https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollec...2725/index.htm which is a parts list for Improved Family. The parts list for Improved Manufacturing from 1891 and 1893 can be found at https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollec.../NMAHTEX/1790/ and https://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollec.../NMAHTEX/1791/

I haven't watched but maybe I think this might have some neat antique machines. Maybe do a search for Improved manufacturing?? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsO...BGDivcuQ3iOQBQ

Does your machine have the Singer logo cast into the base of the machine?

It sure looks like a "5" instead of a "3" in the serial number.

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.

Last edited by OurWorkbench; 06-06-2019 at 06:35 PM. Reason: Not affiliated with off-site links
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Old 06-06-2019, 06:35 PM
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Cathy is referring to the vertical distance between the arm and the bed. The model 12 has less space than the Improved Family. My 15-91 has 5 inches where my 66 has 5.5 inches.
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Old 06-07-2019, 07:53 AM
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Like Penny says, it's the distance between the bed and arm. Most Antique machines have the arm much closer to the bed, and "high arm" became a selling point when manufacturers started making them that way.

My collection is a bit later and other than one or two, I stick to the era of High Arm machines- which is basically what modern machines look like. My collection is mostly 1890-1930 era.



This is my Singer 12, notice how little distance is between the arm and bed -
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Old 06-08-2019, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Macybaby View Post
Like Penny says, it's the distance between the bed and arm. Most Antique machines have the arm much closer to the bed, and "high arm" became a selling point when manufacturers started making them that way.

My collection is a bit later and other than one or two, I stick to the era of High Arm machines- which is basically what modern machines look like. My collection is mostly 1890-1930 era.



This is my Singer 12, notice how little distance is between the arm and bed -
That's a real beaut, Cathy!
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:25 AM
  #18  
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Hi! Did you know that there are three sites focussed on vintage and antique sewing machines at Groups.io? I’m really sorry but I’m not very technical so I’ve no idea how to send you a link to the Groups. One group is solely about Singers, another is solely for Husqvarna Vikings and the third is a mixed group. I am a member of all of them and I can truthfully say that the knowledge and advice from people in the Groups is exceptional. I expect other people on this forum already know of them. I would try asking there as well as on this forum. Someone here might know how to find the site far better then me!
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:55 AM
  #19  
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Thanks, Rees - I did go sign up there, I appreciate it. I was not aware of that site. ��
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