Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main > For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
Hopefully bringing a Singer 401g back from a long sleep >

Hopefully bringing a Singer 401g back from a long sleep

Hopefully bringing a Singer 401g back from a long sleep

Old 09-14-2020, 04:35 AM
  #31  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,930
Default

Polishes vary a lot, I have had metal polishes starting to dissolve paints (like on Elnas), you can't go by random choice, you have to get the right stuff for the job. I lean towards furniture polishes suitable for shellac, or resin type car polishes. On very special machines I would hardly dare anything but gentle cleaning. I allow a few signs of wear and age, I don't mind. I do touch ups of chips and if there are spots where the paint is missing or very worn. A machine should be in bad shape before I do a refinish and complete stripping of the old paint. I tend to avoid too much rust or damaged chrome. I clean off all grime and dirt, usually with a bit of effort, and it takes a few turns of cleaning and polishing before I get there. Maybe a bit of dissasembly here and there too. I poke around with tooth picks, cotton swabs,...

It looks like your machine is cleaning up very well. Any test stiching, or new leather belt?

Last edited by Mickey2; 09-14-2020 at 04:38 AM.
Mickey2 is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 09:20 AM
  #32  
Member
 
Rebaquilts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Sunset Coast of Michigan
Posts: 74
Default Wd40

I would avoid using wd40 as it has chemicals that are unnecessary and left overs will continue to break down oil. Instead, use kerosene, that was recommended at the time and several SM mechanic experts recommend it. I use a kerosene alternative, called klean heat, it doesn't have the smell. Just my opinion. Good luck!! Reba
Rebaquilts is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 12:12 PM
  #33  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 15
Default

Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
It looks like your machine is cleaning up very well. Any test stiching, or new leather belt?
No test stitching yet, altough I can't wait. I still need to clean the treadle. Today I cleaned the machines covers.
I'll be needing a new belt definitely. The original one snapped close to were both ends join so with any luck I'll be able to cut the broken part and make a new joint.
Then it's a matter of learning how to thread the line and work the machine.

Originally Posted by Rebaquilts View Post
I would avoid using wd40 as it has chemicals that are unnecessary and left overs will continue to break down oil. Instead, use kerosene, that was recommended at the time and several SM mechanic experts recommend it. I use a kerosene alternative, called klean heat, it doesn't have the smell. Just my opinion. Good luck!! Reba
Thank you Reba. I was fortunately able to get rid of all the old oil using only sewing machine oil.
Jay401 is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 12:17 PM
  #34  
Super Member
 
leonf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: near Topeka kansas
Posts: 3,859
Default

Jay, learning to treadle is a skill in itself. practice long enough before you thread it that you can carry on a conversation while keeping the machine spinning the correct way. if you reverse directions when threaded you will snap the thread.
leonf is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 12:28 PM
  #35  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 15
Default

Thank you. I've been watching videos and it seems like a lot of skill and practice goes into it. I just couldn't understand if the thread breaks if you too fast, don't keep a good rythm or because if you just let go of the treadle the needle moves back and snaps the thread. The problem with watching talented people is that they make everything look easier than it is.

Originally Posted by leonf View Post
Jay, learning to treadle is a skill in itself. practice long enough before you thread it that you can carry on a conversation while keeping the machine spinning the correct way. if you reverse directions when threaded you will snap the thread.
Jay401 is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 12:43 PM
  #36  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,930
Default

I have only done a little bit of treadling, but I dare say it is within doable. You can go full speed, with zigzag patterns you do that some times. the tricky thing is the large wheel on the treadle can end up turing the wrong way. That is part of the learning process, just make sure you start by guiding the wheel the correct way on the first stitches and after everytime you stop and start again. A steady pace is preferable, it is not too difficult and don't worry. The machine does most of the job regarding stiching and fabric feed, thread snapping should not be a problem and you only need the really fine tuned skills for freemotion like quilting and embroidery.

Last edited by Mickey2; 09-14-2020 at 12:46 PM.
Mickey2 is offline  
Old 09-14-2020, 05:20 PM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 379
Default

Quite a change in a short amount of time. Good for you!
0xygen tubing, aquarium tubing, window screen spline, can also be used as a treadle belt alternative. A leather treadle belt can usually be found online for under $10.00.
WIChix is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 04:28 AM
  #38  
Junior Member
 
Hooligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Ontario
Posts: 188
Default

Looking forward to seeing the treadle 401 finished
Hooligan is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:50 AM
  #39  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 15
Default

Thank you Mickey and WIChix. I'll order some treadle belt from Amazon and some needles while I'm at it.

Originally Posted by Hooligan View Post
Looking forward to seeing the treadle 401 finished
Thank you. For now it's on Amazons court, but as soon as I'm finished I'll post about.

Meanwhile here's a before and after of the wood top and a shot of the assembled machine+treadle.





Jay401 is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 06:59 AM
  #40  
Super Member
 
OurWorkbench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,265
Default

Originally Posted by Jay401 View Post
...Meanwhile here's a before and after of the wood top and a shot of the assembled machine+treadle. ...
Beautiful, very well done. What did you use on the wood?

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
OurWorkbench is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.