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Thread: Just unearthed my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758!

  1. #26
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    I've been useing singers machine oil. the oil underneath the cam was black oddly enough. Like motor oil. I wonder if it eventually turns dark? But yes I have oiled every where the manual said to oil and the a few other places that looked to have moving parts.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  2. #27
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    I've noticed a number of machines here that the oil turned black. I think what happens is the machine runs "Dry" once or twice. A little bit of "debris" is formed from the joints rubbing on each other and when the machine is oiled next again, it's the mixing of the oil and the debris that makes it turn black. It's especially bad where the grease is used on the gears if the gears ran dry and someone was over enthusiastic with the next greasing. I'll look for the picture of my 401 before I cleaned it up. There was black stuff flung everywhere, it was nasty.

  3. #28
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    thank you so much Archaic! thats what i figured too! or that it just turns murky and dirty with age (like car oil)
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  4. #29
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    It probably does. There's bound to be some friction regardless of the oil.

    Here, at least it probably didn't look like this:

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    The lid was covered too, on the inside. Over all, it was a really grubby machine when I got it. I thought, it'll never be a show piece, but it will be a great work horse.... it cleaned up really well though. OxiClean is what saved it.

  5. #30
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    It probably does. There's bound to be some friction regardless of the oil.

    Here, at least it probably didn't look like this:

    The lid was covered too, on the inside. Over all, it was a really grubby machine when I got it. I thought, it'll never be a show piece, but it will be a great work horse.... it cleaned up really well though. OxiClean is what saved it.
    Oxyclean??? What did you use oxyclean on? (it saved a kewpie doll for me. but never thought of trying it on metal?)
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  6. #31
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Oxyclean??? What did you use oxyclean on? (it saved a kewpie doll for me. but never thought of trying it on metal?)
    Everything. The body, the really grungy insides. Then I made sure I wiped everything I'd touched down with a clean wet rag. All of this will come off / out with Oxi....
    The really bad parts (like the tensioner that you don't see) I soaked in Oxi, fully disassembled, rinsed, then dried overnight and reassembled.

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    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #32
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    OK,.. here we go:
    (Sorry about the awkward hand positions, I was going for clarity, not comfort.
    And so so sorry to everyone on dial up. I don't know a better way to demonstrate this.)
    To thread this machine:

    Step 1: The book says with two hands, slip thread horizontally between tension discs from the top.
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    Step 2: Book: With Right hand, lead thread under thread guide on right side...
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    This is what it will look like when you've lead it under the guide.
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    A further back shot of that right side threading. Note too on the left that the thread is on top of the spring.
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    Step 3: Book: And with left hand, lead thread over spring and under guide on the left side.
    It's hard to see, but a slightly toward the back of the machine motion will hook it under the guide.
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    Step 4: Threading the rest of the machine (over the hills, through the woods, etc.)
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    Step 5: Threading the last part of the upper thread.
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    Completely threaded.
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    Now, this is what the machine looks like in "sewing" mode:
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    And in Bobbin winding mode:
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    If you look carefully, you might be able to see that pushing the lever to the left made that portion under the bobbin case rise up a little. That's important for bobbin winding mode.

    To take it out of bobbin winding mode, close the slide plate.

  8. #33
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I found a Singer 500 that looked a lot like that pic in window #29 - mine had oil in there - a big pool of oil and splashes everywhere when it ran. Then I just got one - opened up the balance wheel and that was FULL of oil. That machine sounds VERY odd. Makes you wonder what is going on. I'm wondering if that one is graphite or something used to lubricate those gears for some reason. And it could be graphite and grease mixed - who knows what goes on in people's heads. Maybe they thought it would go faster or quieter - how does it sound?

    Oh now I see the rest of the pics - nine times out of ten when I find a Slant-O-Matic of any sort they are in that kind of condition. Some better than others. I've seen that tension style on a Genie I think. I sure did hate that one. I still wonder if someone used graphite on your machine - metal stuff coming off anyway.
    Last edited by miriam; 10-12-2012 at 12:41 AM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  9. #34
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Hey Miriam, why do you suppose so many of the 400 and 500 series machines end up that way? I'm wondering if it has anything to do with that fiber gear. It makes the machine seem louder than it needs to be, maybe people try "anything" to quiet it down? The 403 and the 503 weren't nearly this grungy. I really thought it was permanent. It didn't come off if you scratched it with a nail or anything.

    That machine now that it's cleaned up and properly lubed, seems really good. It still flings black with the new grease, but I think that will happen until I clean the fiber gear of every speck of dirt and then some. I haven't had any time to sew on it, but when I got it, it ran slowly and made the growlies that most people complain about. It's quieter now, while test sewing, and after full disassembly, I had the piggy nose off and everything, it ran really nicely during the test stitch phase.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #35
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    thank you so much for the lovely pics!! im excited to try my hand again at her. im also afraid i might further brake her. Hmmm...
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  11. #36
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    My pleasure! Before you power it up and sew, just try everything by turning the hand wheel first. You can't hurt too much using reasonable hand power.

    Oh! And your bobbin area will look different.. it will have feed dogs!

    I'll post back once I get a chance to clean that machine up and get it tuned up, if I can find anything obvious that may be causing your bobbin winder issues. That's likely not going to be til next week now though. I have 4 more machines still on my bench before that one (since it's waiting on parts, and the others aren't), and my goal was to be finished them by the end of next week. Got 4 done this week, I'm aiming for a new personal best.

  12. #37
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Good luck cleaning them!! You can do it!!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  13. #38
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    Hey Miriam, why do you suppose so many of the 400 and 500 series machines end up that way? I'm wondering if it has anything to do with that fiber gear. It makes the machine seem louder than it needs to be, maybe people try "anything" to quiet it down? The 403 and the 503 weren't nearly this grungy. I really thought it was permanent. It didn't come off if you scratched it with a nail or anything.

    That machine now that it's cleaned up and properly lubed, seems really good. It still flings black with the new grease, but I think that will happen until I clean the fiber gear of every speck of dirt and then some. I haven't had any time to sew on it, but when I got it, it ran slowly and made the growlies that most people complain about. It's quieter now, while test sewing, and after full disassembly, I had the piggy nose off and everything, it ran really nicely during the test stitch phase.
    I no longer pull off the piggy nose - too much work... I'm glad you got it working better. I have one the sounded really funny - it had about a teaspoon of oil inside the balance wheel. - I got it out but had to leave so never tested it. Maybe tomorrow I'll get a chance.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  14. #39
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Good luck cleaning them!! You can do it!!
    So far so,.. uhm... well.

    I was reassembling the bobbin winder for a 128 and the body of the winder fell apart in my hand! Then the same machine had an almost seized motor with wiring needing to be redone, and there are 2 screws missing from the knee bar controller that weren't at the beginning of the day. This is a machine that at first glance was in good shape. I robbed a motor from one of the other machines that's starting to look like a parts machine, so it's up and running, but can't wind bobbins.

    I don't think I've ever had a day like that. Good grief! Now I have to decide if I want to try to JB weld the piece that broke, or find one to order from somewhere. The only one I've seen is pretty rough compared to this one, but I think once there's JB weld on this one, it'll trump rough. *sigh*

    I just have to remember that tomorrow -has- to be better, right?
    Please, please say yes.....

    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I no longer pull off the piggy nose - too much work... I'm glad you got it working better. I have one the sounded really funny - it had about a teaspoon of oil inside the balance wheel. - I got it out but had to leave so never tested it. Maybe tomorrow I'll get a chance.
    Boy, you're not kidding. I think for the most part a Q-Tip and Oxy would do almost as good a job as the removal, and not nearly as much time.

    I may get a chance to try it out tomorrow. I have "Sewing Circle" and as the "sewing machine rescue girl", I should probably sew, since I haven't for the last 2 classes. I have a list of projects I want to do as long as my arm, all things to teach me to quilt on a small scale, but can't decide where to start.

    I'm still trying to figure out how to get SM oil into the balance wheel. I'd love to see a pic of that.

  15. #40
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    So far so,.. uhm... well.

    I'm still trying to figure out how to get SM oil into the balance wheel. I'd love to see a pic of that.
    I opened it up and the oil ran out... so no picture - I'm just not that fast. Might explain why there was a pool of oil over the motor as well... The only way I can figure it would be to put the machine on end and then pour in some oil and quick put the wheel back on then turn it back and pour oil over the motor. Now I'm going to have to pull that motor and see if it is ok. If not, I think I have another motor somewhere. The machine had frozen up stitch selector - someone loved 3 in 1 oil. It was a job to get that back one to move. I thought about dis-assembling it but if you can't get it to move, it wouldn't be that much easier to get apart. I did have to go to drastic measures. My DH laughs every time I do that though. I put cosmetic pads down in under that, stuck a panty liners to the machine to protect the paint and then put a hospital pad around the whole thing so all I had was a little hole exposing that transmission part thingy. Then I painted a pretty stiff chemical on it - usually that will open it right up. This time I had to paint it on multiple times. Then I had to use a heavy hand to move the knob - finally got it to move and then used a tad more chemical to get the dried on 3-in-1 oil off. It only takes one little tiny bit of 3-in-1 oil to gunk up one of those stitch selectors but good. If I had been patient I betcha Triflow would have done the same thing - might have taken a while of soaking and oiling. oil. wait a day. oil. wait a day. a week later do the same. not have to mess with all the pads and chemicals. I love my Singer 403... and my Singer 503 so simple.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  16. #41
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Still deciding what to do with mine. But I've been distracted by my featherweight and birthday. Before I make a final descion of trying to track someone down I will pull it from the cabinet and see what I can see from the underside.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  17. #42
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I opened it up and the oil ran out... so no picture - I'm just not that fast. Might explain why there was a pool of oil over the motor as well... The only way I can figure it would be to put the machine on end and then pour in some oil and quick put the wheel back on then turn it back and pour oil over the motor. Now I'm going to have to pull that motor and see if it is ok. If not, I think I have another motor somewhere. The machine had frozen up stitch selector - someone loved 3 in 1 oil. It was a job to get that back one to move. I thought about dis-assembling it but if you can't get it to move, it wouldn't be that much easier to get apart. I did have to go to drastic measures. My DH laughs every time I do that though. I put cosmetic pads down in under that, stuck a panty liners to the machine to protect the paint and then put a hospital pad around the whole thing so all I had was a little hole exposing that transmission part thingy. Then I painted a pretty stiff chemical on it - usually that will open it right up. This time I had to paint it on multiple times. Then I had to use a heavy hand to move the knob - finally got it to move and then used a tad more chemical to get the dried on 3-in-1 oil off. It only takes one little tiny bit of 3-in-1 oil to gunk up one of those stitch selectors but good. If I had been patient I betcha Triflow would have done the same thing - might have taken a while of soaking and oiling. oil. wait a day. oil. wait a day. a week later do the same. not have to mess with all the pads and chemicals. I love my Singer 403... and my Singer 503 so simple.
    Oh yuck! It's such a shame to find them like that. It's a good thing it found its way to you though. Not a lot of people would take that sort of project on. I was wondering what does old 3in1 look like? I've run into this nasty beige crusted stuff before, mostly on the gears and wondered if that was it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Still deciding what to do with mine. But I've been distracted by my featherweight and birthday. Before I make a final descion of trying to track someone down I will pull it from the cabinet and see what I can see from the underside.
    Can you post a pic of this same area on your machine?
    Just remove the one screw you see and slide the bottom cover off.
    I want to see if the actuator is broken, or out of place or if it's something else doing it.

    In sewing position:
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    In winding position:

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    If you could let me know if the nylon piece is attached tightly to the whole mechanism, or if it just spins around would be great too.

  18. #43
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Oh! Thank you! I will totally look into that piece then! maybe its as simple as loosening something up! That would be fablous if that were the case. I'll see if I can tackle it when I get home. Too much to do too little time!!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  19. #44
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    I suspect it's going to be something that needs to be tightened up.

    I wonder if it became loose at one point and pivoted, and now it's wedged.... hmm,.. I'd really like to see a pic when you have a chance.

    If the worst case happens, and the part is broken, it's still available here and it's not that expensive:
    http://www.sewingpartsonline.com/act...g-machine.aspx

    I've never used these guys, but they seem to have good prices (my cdn cost on the part is over $10, so their markup is reasonable), and good pictures on their site so you can tell that what you're ordering is what you want...

  20. #45
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Archaic im going to send you a PM since we can only post 3 pics at a time correct? Thanks for the link!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  21. #46
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    I managed to get 10 pics in that post earlier about the threading... I think you can get the pics into the thread.

    Either way, I'm replying on the thread in case someone else has the same problem, or can provide more input than I have.

    You mentioned that you can turn things from the bottom and that they turn the top, but turning from the top doesn't turn things at the bottom.

    My thoughts? Strange! I didn't think it was 2 pieces, besides the actuator itself.

    I will have to go look more carefully because here's my understanding of how it's supposed to work:


    • The rod with the cream top and the red circles on it, is simply a lever. It looks exactly like you think it does, straight piece with the push piece on the top.
    • Then you get to the bottom of the machine, that actuator slides onto the bottom of the rod above and is tightened on with the little hex screw that you see on the right side of the collar.
    • The plastic (nylon) part pushes on, or releases, the metal piece that pushes up toward the circular piece and pushes the bobbin case upwards into winding position.


    So here's my homework for you
    • I notice in your pictures that the collar for the actuator is much lower (you can see more of the inside of the collar) on yours than on the one I have here. So, is the plastic of the actuator actually touching the metal that goes to the bobbincase side of things? If it's too low, the lever is actually working harder to do anything it should, and could be binding, or potentially break. We don't want to do that, I don't think that part is one that can be replaced anymore, but I'll have to figure out the part number, it wasn't on that site I showed you.
    • Is the actuator tightened onto the shaft the way it should be? It doesn't have to be holy cow tight, but it can't be loose either. If it's not tight, it will cause the shaft to move at a different rate than the actuator, which -may- cause the bottom moving the top, top not moving the bottom issue you told me about.
    • Can you take a pic of the actuator straight on, like the one I showed? I ask because I can't tell in any of your pics if the rod has a flat spot ("D" shaped) on it or not, like mine does. I want to see if the rod is capable of getting out of alignment (circular) or not ("D" shaped) - Which would explain why your mom felt the need to pry on the top of the rod.
    • If you push on the metal above the circular piece (the one that's controlled by the actuator) does it move up into bobbin winding mode? What happens when you release it? It comes down right away, or it stays there? How hard did you have to push to do it? (don't push so had it feels like something's going to break)
    • Does the actuator become easier to turn when the bobbin case is in winding mode? Moving the bobbincase into winding mode -should- take pressure off the actuator, and make it easier to turn.


    What I'm hoping to figure out here is where the "binding" is.
    Last edited by ArchaicArcane; 10-16-2012 at 01:40 PM. Reason: Clarified how the machine goes into bobbin winding mode

  22. #47
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    I cant seem to edit my post so for the purpose of others who may want to know the information i sent Archaic it was as follows:

    Here are the images that i took:

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    on the right side theres little thumbnails, click on them and it should progress through the album.

    Oddly enough the actuater moves if i push from the bottom, but it doesnt move if i push from the top. but it does move the top if i push the bottom. it is tough to move and doesnt move easily. i cleaned, de-linted and oiled the bits in the bottom... but it didnt help. i thought about unscrewing... but couldnt find where to unscrew??

    thanks so much for all the useful help thus far!!

    Irene

    - What do you mean by collar of the actuator? When the actuator (the plastic part) is moved left or right, the metal part to the right of it does move in and out. I haven't really been able to tell if it actually moves the bobbin on top like its supposed to be. if it does then its really subtle for my eye to catch while fiddling with the actuator. my guess is that its not moving that part??

    - I assume the actuator is on tightly as it takes some effort to push it back and forth. i thought about loosening it, but i couldnt find a screw to do so? I saw the end of the screw on the right but cant seem to find its head?? how do i loosen or tighten it?

    - I havent tried pushing on the actual metal part to see if that does anything. so i will try that next and i will take some pics of it straight on. (and just to be clear the actuator is the plastic part on the BOTTOM of the machine correct? and thats what you want straight on pics of correct? the top plastic bit is curved inwards and not flat. but i believe the bottom one is flat but i will take pics.)
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  23. #48
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    The collar is the metal ring on the actuator that "chokes" the rod that you use to move the actuator from above (btw, I looked that part up - 163786, it's not available anymore, so if we find something wrong with it, PM me and I can ship the one I have here.) so they both move as one.

    It should move up noticeably. I'd say close to an 1/8 in. If you put your finger on the top of the plate - what you would see when the machine is standing in it's normal position, when you're moving the actuator manually you should feel it move. It's hard to be in 2 places at once, I know You won't actually see the bottom portion move, that's the gear for the bobbin case. The part that moves in and out is pushing in to the plate above that gear. Hence the finger

    If that piece under the bobbin case doesn't move, it's a different problem than if the lever's not doing what it's supposed to, so we need to be sure.

    The screw you found on the right is called a set screw. You can't find the head because it doesn't really have one. It's got a recessed area, where a hex key fits. You may not have a set of these if you don't do repairs to a lot of different sorts of things.

    Without being able to check its tightness, you would have to watch the shaft to see if it's moving at a different rate (called "slipping") than the actuator, that's where the "D" shape is really handy, but you can also draw a line with a marker or something and watch that move (or not move)

    Correct. The actuator is what I gave you the original part number and link for - plastic, triangular with a metal collar...
    Inside the actuator's metal collar, you can see the rod that goes to the top with the cream / red on it. On mine, the rod has a D shape, yours looks to me like it's actually round, but I want to be sure.

  24. #49
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Ok,.. that rod has a new number, so it can be replaced:
    http://www.sewingpartsonline.com/bob...45827-451.aspx

    If you look at that picture you can see where the actuator connects to it. The set screw goes against the flat side, so it doesn't turn.

    The actuator (you'll see steps on the top side of it) then pushes on the metal piece that moves the bobbin case up into winding mode.

  25. #50
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    265
    Ok so I took some more pics. As well as some videos. I uploaded them to the link i sent you archaic. I'll upload them here when I get home from work because I can't do it on my phone.

    I oiled the actuator some more today and pushed on the metal part next to it. At first it didn't budge but then it suddenly budged! You can see it in one of the videos. I loosened and tightened the screw on that piece but it made little difference. Of course I didn't have the proper tool. No time to go digging through my dads tool boxes. I was able to move the bit on top today. But it's still really really tough to move and I still get more movement from the bottom then the top.

    My thought is that it is seized up somewhere but also something is wrong. But it's probably inside where I can't see it. :/ poor touch and sew.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

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