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-   -   Cleaning and repairing the Shellac clear coat on Vintage sewing machine heads (https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/cleaning-repairing-shellac-clear-coat-vintage-sewing-machine-heads-t193635.html)

miriam 12-02-2014 01:26 PM

Maybe Glenn can give us some hints on pin rash. I've considered etching a pic of the horse head in the paint where the tension would go if it was a front tension... If I could draw it would help. To me it looks like the mane is already etched... Then it could be a work horse........

Glenn 12-02-2014 02:23 PM

Miriam the pin rash on this machine is easy. I use aniline(alcohol soluble not water) and mix it in the shellac to make a black paint. you can paint it on with a really good brush or wipe it on with a rag. Then use the black shellac and french polish it to a shine. This is what I do and you can see in my tutorial on the Franklin. It will take many applications but well worth it.
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miriam 12-02-2014 02:36 PM


Originally Posted by Glenn (Post 6992384)
Miriam the pin rash on this machine is easy. I use aniline(alcohol soluble not water) and mix it in the shellac to make a black paint. you can paint it on with a really good brush or wipe it on with a rag. Then use the black shellac and french polish it to a shine. This is what I do and you can see in my tutorial on the Franklin. It will take many applications but well worth it.
Skip

This machine is turning out to be one very nice machine. It is a shame people ignore the ugly well used old machines. From what I have seen those are the ones you want to really use and use and use...

miriam 12-02-2014 04:12 PM

I just gave it another few licks. The surface is very smooth feeling and it's sleek but it doesn't look fabulous. Short of a repaint I doubt if it is going to look fabulous. It sure sews fabulous...

redbugsullivan 12-02-2014 05:28 PM

You two are the reason I have tackled so many old machines. Yes, these techniques work. I've had the best results just using the french polishing method. I focus on one small area at a time. It takes practice to blend. The two fingered method, I swirl 1, 2, 3, and swipe up, seems to be the best. Much like working on other machine bodies, I tend to swipe towards an area that will remain hidden. I hope this helps.

jmabby 12-03-2014 08:06 AM

Thanks all,
At this point anything helps. I think I'll try cheesecloth since my tees seem to be too heavy and firm. Do you ever use pumice powder in cheesecloth (on a dry finish) to smooth out some of the tiny bubbles/streaks? It appears I'm doing better, but still not satisfied with the finish. I let it go yesterday afternoon otherwise I would have stripped it down again.

miriam 12-03-2014 09:15 AM


Originally Posted by jmabby (Post 6993328)
Thanks all,
At this point anything helps. I think I'll try cheesecloth since my tees seem to be too heavy and firm. Do you ever use pumice powder in cheesecloth (on a dry finish) to smooth out some of the tiny bubbles/streaks? It appears I'm doing better, but still not satisfied with the finish. I let it go yesterday afternoon otherwise I would have stripped it down again.

I've never had any bubbles - you are using very little shellac at a time - I don't know why you would want to use cheese cloth. You are not applying shellac you are softening old shellac and it is merging with what little bit of shellac you are rubbing into it. If you want a nice even finish you will need to remove all the old and spray it with something. Of course then you will need new decals. Glenn's method is not some kind of hurry up thing it is definitely old world style craftsmanship. Some people have said they like the description I made here: http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...h-t257669.html

Glenn 12-03-2014 11:18 AM


Originally Posted by jmabby (Post 6993328)
Thanks all,
At this point anything helps. I think I'll try cheesecloth since my tees seem to be too heavy and firm. Do you ever use pumice powder in cheesecloth (on a dry finish) to smooth out some of the tiny bubbles/streaks? It appears I'm doing better, but still not satisfied with the finish. I let it go yesterday afternoon otherwise I would have stripped it down again.

No cheese cloth please it will cause you problems. I use well worn T's that are very soft or tighty whities well worn also. I don't know why you have tiny bubbles unless you are using to much shellac. I don't think you need to strip it down again you just need to keep working on it untll the streaks are gone. I really think you might be rushing the process. Try a small area with just denatured alcohol and linseed oil with a light touch untill the bubbles are gone. Any very soft rag will work.

jmabby 12-06-2014 09:40 AM

I've been working on the shellac procedure, I had a difficult start. I was working too fast (as Glen said) and putting on too much linseed oil producing bubbles. Thanks for all the help, the machine looks like it will be beautiful. I had to walk away from it for a couple of days and read over Glen's tut about 3 times. I can't believe how good she looks. I was so proud, showed her to a friend (non sewer) she said "Why would you waste your time doing all that work when you have a $1K machine in the other room"? No use trying to explain, she hates anything old, but she does like me as a friend, and I'm older than the machine.

Rodney 12-06-2014 12:04 PM

Glenn congrats on this being made a sticky! Thanks Admin for moving it here. This is where it belongs.
Rodney


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