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Recommendations for an 11 year old

Recommendations for an 11 year old

Old 09-03-2015, 05:36 AM
  #21  
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Whatever you decide, just don't get her a toy machine. That would be enough to make her quit sewing before she really gets started! My DGD got a toy machine for Christmas and I tried to teach her to sew with it; it was a disaster. I ended up finding her a nice '80s Kenmore for $25.
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Old 09-03-2015, 05:54 AM
  #22  
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Babylock has a nice line of inexpensive machines and they are very user friendly.
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:32 AM
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One advantage older machines have over newer ones for beginning sewers is the parts are easily seen and understood. Things like the take up arm and top tension are usually visible. You can see what's going on. The beginning sewer can see how the tension assembly works and how the thread must pass through the disks correctly to work. New machines tend to hide things inside the housing. You just pull the thread along a path. Another advantage is old machines need to be oiled and maintained. Why is that an advantage? It teaches young sewers how to care for a machine. It's a skill that applies to far more than just sewing.
From what I've seen of beginner level new machines one way the makers save money is they leave things out. Instead of variable stitch length and width, you have a limited choice of preset stitch lengths and widths. I don't know that it's critical but it's nice to have options.
Cost is another advantage. You get a lot of value for your money buying an old machine. They may not have all the features a higher end new model has but they're well built and with a little care will last another lifetime or longer.
I don't think the newer machines will age as gracefully as the old ones have.
Rodney
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:51 AM
  #24  
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is the Sewmor aluminum Joe? I feel like I should be buying them all and setting up a business But I won't.
Thanks again for setting me on the trail.
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Old 09-03-2015, 07:35 AM
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my granddaughter liked the simple brother because of the speed control. She hasn't sewn since it died. They like to go slow, looks like I'm going to have to replace it. She's 8 Hope that helps
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Old 09-03-2015, 05:40 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by quilt938 View Post
hmm I'm partial to the 301 and featherweight but I have some 3/4 size kenmores(unfortunately I haven't made time to try them out enough to know if they're awesome but others have assured me they are..) the 1020, 1030 1040, 1045, 1050 that have the rose embossed cases? they do zig zag and different stitches built in -s omeone here I think said the bobbin winder is delicate though and hard to find replacement if it breaks
I heartily endorse these Rose Case Kenmores. This is the machine my sewing machine mechanic recommended I get and was he ever spot on! They are sweet 3/4 machines with beautiful stitches. I have had not one problem with mine and it's my go to for retreats and classes. I do have a featherweight but prefer the Rose. She's got what it takes and, for a girl gift, you gotta love that rose case! She packs up nice into a surprisingly slimline case. The hidden tool drawer is pretty neat as well.

I predict that this Kenmore series will be the next "featherweight" machine of choice for quilters in the Know! They are a bit heavier than the featherweights but, in my case, tough enough to back up any of my other 11 machines if needed.

Last edited by mhollifiel; 09-03-2015 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:56 PM
  #27  
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shopgoodwill has one of the rose case kenmores ..not sure which model it is but I think all of them do straight and zig zag and a couple more - just more stitches the higher up the model I think

glad you like yours Holli- I want to play around with mine some more- my retreat machine in July was a 301 I had just started piddling with July 4 - it was sewing good and I ended up leaving my other machine in the car and just used the 301. the 301 I'm fiddling with now isn't impressing me- I think it's the little foot 1/4 inch foot though- doesn't seem to be giving me a 1/4 inch..sigh...
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Old 09-04-2015, 05:09 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by KalamaQuilts View Post
is the Sewmor aluminum Joe? I feel like I should be buying them all and setting up a business But I won't.
Thanks again for setting me on the trail.
Yes, that SEWMOR 303 is aluminum. Mine in it's case with it's controller weighs about the same as our FW in the box does.

Joe
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Old 09-04-2015, 05:26 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
One advantage older machines have over newer ones for beginning sewers is the parts are easily seen and understood. Things like the take up arm and top tension are usually visible. You can see what's going on. The beginning sewer can see how the tension assembly works and how the thread must pass through the disks correctly to work. New machines tend to hide things inside the housing. You just pull the thread along a path. Another advantage is old machines need to be oiled and maintained. Why is that an advantage? It teaches young sewers how to care for a machine. It's a skill that applies to far more than just sewing.
From what I've seen of beginner level new machines one way the makers save money is they leave things out. Instead of variable stitch length and width, you have a limited choice of preset stitch lengths and widths. I don't know that it's critical but it's nice to have options.
Cost is another advantage. You get a lot of value for your money buying an old machine. They may not have all the features a higher end new model has but they're well built and with a little care will last another lifetime or longer.
I don't think the newer machines will age as gracefully as the old ones have.
Rodney
DEAD ON.
There are a lot of the younger people very aware of going 'green'
Some of them are buying used things and keeping things maintained.
Very good lessons - sew and maintain and keep our planet green by using the old already manufactured things.
The reason I say 'things' is because there are people rebuilding old appliances or old cars etc.

Last edited by miriam; 09-04-2015 at 05:30 AM.
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Old 09-05-2015, 11:32 AM
  #30  
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I haven't taught any 11 year old's to sew, but I have a 403A and it's a terrific machine! It has a great straight stitch, as well as the decorative stitches when using the decorative cams. It's not difficult to use or thread, and it's simple to thread, oil and maintain!

Jeanette
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