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Thread: Singer 111W153 & table resto project

  1. #1
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    Singer 111W153 & table resto project

    Hi everyone,


    I just got this as my first machine from my uncle who had it sitting in his basement for the past few years. He had it for a while and used it to fix horse blankets for people at shows when my cousin was into the horse game. I'm excited to have it and love how it looks! We turned on the motor and it ran well in his basement.


    My plan is to just do quick cleanup on the machine (while leaving the original patina), clean up the table with new paint on the legs and a wood treatment for the top (also keeping the patina), and hopefully get it running nicely to sew some stuff!


    Some pics attached. So far I've cleaned up the machine, oiled it up, disassembled the whole table, sandblasted the legs, painted them (now letting them dry).

    Next step is going to be applying the wood treatment for the top which I will hopefully do in the next few days.

    Oh and btw, from another thread I made on the leatherworker.net forums, with the help of some members there, we were able to determine that this machine was built around 1943 in Bridgeport, USA!























  2. #2
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    Those numbers look like Army stenciling, your machine must be a WWII vet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocsew View Post
    Those numbers look like Army stenciling, your machine must be a WWII vet.
    Yeah! I think they were used to make parachutes etc during the war. Then this one was used in the Woods plant to make sleeping bags. The wood on the table is depressed where I'm guessing the zippers were fed through its while life

  4. #4
    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
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    Stunning! Have fun.
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
    Yorkville, IL

  5. #5
    KLO
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    What a great project you have. Did your uncle actually lug that around to horse shows to fix those blankets? That thing looks heavy .... and well used. I do see that "dip" on the front edge of the wood top. Ah the stories it could tell! What will you use it for? Cannot wait to see it put back together.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvstoquilt View Post
    Stunning! Have fun.
    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by KLO View Post
    What a great project you have. Did your uncle actually lug that around to horse shows to fix those blankets? That thing looks heavy .... and well used. I do see that "dip" on the front edge of the wood top. Ah the stories it could tell! What will you use it for? Cannot wait to see it put back together.
    Thanks! No he actually took the blankets home with him, washed them with a pressure washer & dried them, then fixed them with the machine, and yep, it is heavy .

    As for the uses, I'm not sure yet...I'm hoping to do some leather work (wallets, bags, etc), and maybe some upholstery for cars and motorcycles...just having a hard time finding out where to get the materials from (I'm in Canada).

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    Just another update since I managed to get everything painted, the legs assembled, as well as the top coated with finishing wax. Doesn't look half bad.







    Christmas present I got!





    And one of my dad's current project...Pullmax custom metal shaper





    Some more pictures from the shop











    And my dads custom made CNC Plasma table, which I will use to cut out the foot pedal I need to make.


  8. #8
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    Worked on the foot pedal today since the table and machine didn't come with it (it was removed for some reason). Started out by designing the piece to be cut in Autocad, then cut it out on my dad's CNC plasma. Then bent it up on our sheet metal break. Finally, made some inserts for the mounts on the table to allow the pedal to pivot. Still need to weld up the corners and paint/apply some rubber or something to the face of it.



























  9. #9
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I wish I still had my Singer 111. My wildest project was a couple WWII officers tents. There were two tents and 3 awnings. Two awnings over the tents and one between. There were grommets in the side walls to roll the walls. Used in Philippines. A couple vets saw the tents set up at Fort Knox and commented that they didn’t think there was any of those left. I went down to Fort Knox and got the blue prints copied at the library. I’m thinking I used every scrap of the bolt of fabric. Canvac treatment. Like sewing on a crayon.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I wish I still had my Singer 111. My wildest project was a couple WWII officers tents. There were two tents and 3 awnings. Two awnings over the tents and one between. There were grommets in the side walls to roll the walls. Used in Philippines. A couple vets saw the tents set up at Fort Knox and commented that they didn’t think there was any of those left. I went down to Fort Knox and got the blue prints copied at the library. I’m thinking I used every scrap of the bolt of fabric. Canvac treatment. Like sewing on a crayon.
    Awesome! At first I thought you meant you sewed them during the war! You made them for yourself? Where does one get that sort of fabric? I'm kind of at a loss where to get my fabric from...there are some stores around here but I'm pretty sure they only sell home type stuff for clothes etc.

  11. #11
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    I am so impressed with your clutch pedal and pivot for it. I was drooling over the shop equipment. I also know that tools poorly used make poor products. You have nailed these well. Welcome aboard. Not many of us have industrails, but they are sooooo cool.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

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    Quote Originally Posted by leonf View Post
    I am so impressed with your clutch pedal and pivot for it. I was drooling over the shop equipment. I also know that tools poorly used make poor products. You have nailed these well. Welcome aboard. Not many of us have industrails, but they are sooooo cool.
    Thanks so much! I thought I had put a short video of cutting out the pedal on my previous post, but looks like it didnt' make it, check it out here if you're interested!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_OIBtYw9qI

  13. #13
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    That was sooo fun.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  14. #14
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    Hi guys and gals,


    I finally got the machine installed in my room, messed around with the table quite a bit, installed and removed the legs, moved them over, bla bla, looks pretty good.


    I was hoping someone could help me with adjusting the presser foot knee lift. Whenever I do it, the rod on the machine seems to want to twist, and then all of a sudden it "lets go", and makes a spring type noise. From the videos I've watched, the action is suppose to be smooth. Also, could someone explain how to adjust the spring that is on the rod itself with the set screw? Not sure where to set it exactly.









    As you can see in the last pic, the rod has been rubbing on the machine every time it moves up and down, not sure if it's the bend that it has is wrong or what...Not sure what they're suppose to look like.




    Last edited by Sugarkryptonite; 01-06-2019 at 03:13 PM.

  15. #15
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    I've never done it personally but here's the service manual http://parts.singerco.com/IPinstManu..._W154_W155.pdf. I really like your craftsmanship on that pedal, I have to admit I would have taken the lazy man's route and used a piece of plywood lol

  16. #16
    Member Borletti Milano's Avatar
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    Loved the video of the cutting. Did you video the machining of the pedal pivots? Great stuff - I can watch stuff being made all day!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocsew View Post
    I've never done it personally but here's the service manual http://parts.singerco.com/IPinstManu..._W154_W155.pdf. I really like your craftsmanship on that pedal, I have to admit I would have taken the lazy man's route and used a piece of plywood lol
    Thanks! I've got the manual already but they don't mention anything about the knee lift in there I think I have it figured out, though. Will post with an update soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Borletti Milano View Post
    Loved the video of the cutting. Did you video the machining of the pedal pivots? Great stuff - I can watch stuff being made all day!
    Thanks! Glad you liked it. Unfortunately no I did not.

  18. #18
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Top value fabric - mail order only - Carmel Indiana sells all kinds of canvas.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  19. #19
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    Dad was able to get all my packages yesterday at our P.O. box in NY. Got some small parts, screws, bobbins, and my new servo motor. I had bought a new belt this past week, the same size as my old one, thinking that it would fit the servo motor, but nope....

    Was able to make up some parts with my dad to get it to fit temporarily with this belt. Unfortunately some problems with the parts I got...was sent the wrong thread tension release slide, and the switch on the servo motor was broken out of the box.








  20. #20
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    Got it back together today. Had to take the new wrong thread release slide that I was sent, cut it in half, and weld it to my old one to make a functional piece. Also had to add some weld to the tip of the thread release pin because it was worn down from so much use.

    I'm now having an issue where part of my top thread is getting caught under the bobbin case. I can still sew fine (although top tension appears to be way too tight, even backed off all the way, bobbin tension seems to be good), until the end, when I lift the presser foot and try to pull my piece out. It's jammed in there, with 4 threads attached to the material and the machine, all a big mess.

    I had timed the machine and adjusted the bobbin tension a few weeks ago, but this is the first time I use the machine with a motor. Anyone have any ideas? Timing off? Need to check it again.

  21. #21
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    After having problems with the original knee lift setup binding, thanks to the idea of someone on the leatherworker forum, as well as seeing pics of the Consew 226B lift arm which has a similar bearing on the end, my dad and I decided to make our own. I included some pics of the machining process for those interested. Seems to work well.




















    Also added its own tire on the wheel












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