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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop Machine Photos

  1. #1951
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    Really, those are collectable??? How come nobody wants it?
    Cos you have a weird market there I've never seen one here.

  2. #1952
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    I've never seen one of those around here either. Blackside 128s yes, but not 99s....

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
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  3. #1953
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    Maybe I should jump on it. She's asking $65. The belt is rotten and the electrical cord has been redone along the way. I don't know what else to look at. I didn't try to turn it on but the needle moves when I spun the freewheel, and the freewheel moves freely.

  4. #1954
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Belts and cords can be redone without really compromising the machine. The fact that the slide plate is there is almost miraculous. You'd be hard pressed to replace a blackside plate. I'd probably pay $65 if I had it.

  5. #1955
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I see that its threaded wrong, maybe that's why nobody wants it? It won't sew like that.

  6. #1956
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    Light running is the model. I have one that dates to 1892. Try looking up the serial number. Your decals are in better shape than mine so might be newer. I don't know how many years New Home made this model.. New Home is now Janome. Hope any of this helps.

    to cabbagepatchkid.
    Last edited by lolthom; 12-31-2014 at 05:11 PM.

  7. #1957
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    Hi.

    I'm not sure if this is the best place to post this but oh well I'm sure you'll point me in the right direction. I recently bought an old sewing machine for my girlfriend as a birthday present and we were trying to figure out the brand and model. Here are some pictures:


    Were the decal is faded (on that blank space) it seems like it was written Sarina or
    something like that
    Name:  20150113_101442_resized.jpg
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    J, C and S. Don't know the order
    Name:  20150113_101449_resized.jpg
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    Not sure if the legs are original. They are in pretty good condition
    Name:  20150113_101629_resized.jpg
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    You can see the head's cover on the floor to the left
    Name:  20150113_101417_resized.jpg
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    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by NightFox17; 01-13-2015 at 05:17 AM.

  8. #1958
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Nightfox,

    First Welcome!!!

    Second, Perfect spot. Unless you would like to open a unique thread so it can be discussed separately (totally cool)

    Not immediately familiar with that badge, but I'll take a look around. Based on the fact that it appears to have a full reverse, and the shape and style of that mechanism, I would guess a 1915-1935 German machine. If so it should have excellent engineering and manufacturing and be a great sewing machine..

    It looks to be in great shape (a picture of the underside of the head would really help)

    Clean the body,wood, and mechanisms with sewing machine oil ONLY to start with. After you become more familiar with your machine and this site, we can walk you through other methods to really bring it to the best it can look and work.

    Congrats!

  9. #1959
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    Nightfox,

    First Welcome!!!

    Second, Perfect spot. Unless you would like to open a unique thread so it can be discussed separately (totally cool)

    Not immediately familiar with that badge, but I'll take a look around. Based on the fact that it appears to have a full reverse, and the shape and style of that mechanism, I would guess a 1915-1935 German machine. If so it should have excellent engineering and manufacturing and be a great sewing machine..

    It looks to be in great shape (a picture of the underside of the head would really help)

    Clean the body,wood, and mechanisms with sewing machine oil ONLY to start with. After you become more familiar with your machine and this site, we can walk you through other methods to really bring it to the best it can look and work.

    Congrats!
    Thank you very much! What do you mean by " a full reverse"? I really don't know anything about much about sewing machines. I'll try to get a picture of the underside of the head when I get the opportunity. Thanks again.

  10. #1960
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightFox17 View Post
    ...What do you mean by " a full reverse"?

    It appears that the stitch length adjustment lever (the big vertical silver thing on the main body(pillar)) has the ability to be placed all the way to the top and the machine would stitch in reverse (makes ending seams more secure) That feature was for the most part not available until about 1915-1920 for domestic machines.

    One of the really nice things about German machines of this era is that they maintained the old school method of having the needle bar "bob" once during each cycle(like a seamstress of old tugging each stitch tight) but also were early adopters of the reversible drive engineering. Makes them some of the best machines EVER to sew with. (Yes, they do make a better stitch than a modern machine)

  11. #1961
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    Oh! Ok. Thanks!

  12. #1962
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    ok, I think we got it... (With the gracious help of Mike from Wolfegangs)

    This is the badge of the June Sewing Machine Company. (June Manufacturing Company actually)
    "Makers of Improved Singer Sewing machines"

    Here is a cool bit at the Smithsonian about the company (early documentation)
    http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollect...ges/image1.htm

    Here is an article about Singer taking them to court for name infringment
    https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/163/169/

    According to WorldCat they were in business from 1860 to 1929



  13. #1963
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Stouer, German made.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  14. #1964
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Sure looks like it! Good eye.

    Stoewer

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...130994-12.html

    http://vintageelectronics.nl/_script...wing%20machine

    I'll send the info to Mike as well
    Last edited by SteveH; 01-13-2015 at 06:32 PM. Reason: more research

  15. #1965
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    Steve, there's a short historical piece on ISMACS.net about National Sewing Machine Company, June Manufacturing and Eldredge -- might be interesting!

    Jeanette

  16. #1966
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    Yup my girlfriend ended up figuring out it was a Stoewer thanks to your information also.

    Our machine is almost identical to the one in the video, with some differences. I'm guessing different years.

    The one on the video is call "The Pheonix" and I'm finding it really hard to read pheonix from what was on the machine. Like I said it seemed more along the lines of "Sarina", but I could be wrong.

    I wish there was something like the Singer site were you could easily figure out the date of the machine through the serial number.

  17. #1967
    Junior Member Laurajbr's Avatar
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    I put myself through college in large part with a featherweight! The year I started school the fashion for pants went from wide leg to narrow, and my Featherweight would do denim, corduroy anything I asked of it. It went astray in a move, and I was heartbroken.
    When I am perfect, I will write a book and everyone can be perfect too. Until then I will just have to be gracious in face of imperfection, and ask the same of everyone else for my imperfections.

  18. #1968
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    I know the logo is not correct, but is it possible the name is Caesarina? That the badged name from Silberberg & Co. , a German distributor of machines. The logo sure looks like a C J and S.
    Maria
    Smoky Mountains of Tennessee

  19. #1969
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    Just a shot!
    Is it possible the name is Caesarina? That would make it a badged machine distributed by J Silberberg & Co, a German sewing machine distributor. The logo badge looks like it has a S, C and J on the brass badge, but that is not what the Silberberg logo, that I am familiar with, looks like! Maybe it was changed?

    After the war, people tried to remove any name that would tie a sewing machine to Germany. Since it is not a drophead machine, I can't attribute the name being so light to handling the head each time the machine was lifted.
    Maria
    Smoky Mountains of Tennessee

  20. #1970
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    Yesterday this machine jumped out at me and I had to bring it home. It has a motor but no cords or foot peddle.Name:  image.jpg
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  21. #1971
    Senior Member KenmoreRulesAll's Avatar
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    That White is in excellent shape.

  22. #1972
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    I know. I have no interest in White's but when I saw this in the shop I asked who had cleaned it up. The gal working gave me blank look and said the local antique deal had dropped it off. The price was right . Only problem is that there are no power cords or foot control for the motor. Looking for some irons for her.

  23. #1973
    Senior Member 4dogs's Avatar
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    that sure is a pretty one........I would have to bring it home too........
    Judy, retired RN, alias 4 dogs and in the mountains of western North Carolina.

    Someday you will be a memory - try to make it a good one .

  24. #1974
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    Wow, it really is in wonderful condition.

  25. #1975
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    Wow, those are beautiful.

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