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Thread: Wheeler & Wilson No. 9

  1. #26
    Muv
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstQuilt
    Quote Originally Posted by wuv2quilt
    WOW! Ain't she a beaut. :)
    Yep, a beaut! The photos were taken with my crappy cell phone camera. Better pictures later when I clean her up. I'm going to go slowly and carefully, thanks to Billy's tutorial. (Besides, the LaVincendora is still in pieces -- this is all too much, too fast. Ain't life on the internets sweet?)
    Hello FirstQuilt,

    You might be interested in a couple of videos I have posted on Youtube showing how to clean and oil vintage machines.

    I do all my machine cleaning on the kitchen table with very basic equipment. I don't take machines apart, but I will remove small components purely to get at bits that are otherwise difficult to clean. Also, I don't use paraffin (which I believe you call kerosene) because WD40 works just as well, and I've never bathed a machine. You can find the links at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==bidpJsAzc2A for Part 1 and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==SKR5t4DyPwM for Part 2.

    Please let me know how you get on!

  2. #27
    Senior Member grayhare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muv
    Quote Originally Posted by FirstQuilt
    Quote Originally Posted by wuv2quilt
    WOW! Ain't she a beaut. :)
    Yep, a beaut! The photos were taken with my crappy cell phone camera. Better pictures later when I clean her up. I'm going to go slowly and carefully, thanks to Billy's tutorial. (Besides, the LaVincendora is still in pieces -- this is all too much, too fast. Ain't life on the internets sweet?)
    Hello FirstQuilt,

    You might be interested in a couple of videos I have posted on Youtube showing how to clean and oil vintage machines.

    I do all my machine cleaning on the kitchen table with very basic equipment. I don't take machines apart, but I will remove small components purely to get at bits that are otherwise difficult to clean. Also, I don't use paraffin (which I believe you call kerosene) because WD40 works just as well, and I've never bathed a machine. You can find the links at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==bidpJsAzc2A for Part 1 and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==SKR5t4DyPwM for Part 2.

    Please let me know how you get on!
    I was able to find your videos on Youtube. Thank you, they are very helpful! I like your tip on using crochet cotton thread to clean some of the hard to reach bars.

  3. #28
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Nice machine! I didn't think the glass came with machines beyond the 8, so I learned something new, altho all of the presser feet are interchangable between my #8 and my Singer W9. and no, Singer didn't distribute them either.

    Have fun with it! :) (And I'd take that glass foot off... ;) )

  4. #29
    Member FirstQuilt's Avatar
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    Why take the glass foot off? Will it break? (It's already a bit smunched.)

    There are 4 different styles of glass feet shown with W&W No. 9 on Needlebar.org. My WW9 is early one. Maybe they stopped issuing glass feet.

  5. #30
    QM
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    Wow!

  6. #31
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    Awesome! Love it. Jealous. Lol

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muv
    Quote Originally Posted by FirstQuilt
    Quote Originally Posted by wuv2quilt
    WOW! Ain't she a beaut. :)
    Yep, a beaut! The photos were taken with my crappy cell phone camera. Better pictures later when I clean her up. I'm going to go slowly and carefully, thanks to Billy's tutorial. (Besides, the LaVincendora is still in pieces -- this is all too much, too fast. Ain't life on the internets sweet?)
    Hello FirstQuilt,

    You might be interested in a couple of videos I have posted on Youtube showing how to clean and oil vintage machines.

    I do all my machine cleaning on the kitchen table with very basic equipment. I don't take machines apart, but I will remove small components purely to get at bits that are otherwise difficult to clean. Also, I don't use paraffin (which I believe you call kerosene) because WD40 works just as well, and I've never bathed a machine. You can find the links at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==bidpJsAzc2A for Part 1 and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v==SKR5t4DyPwM for Part 2.

    Please let me know how you get on!
    Your videos did not come up properly, but I found them and here is the link I used: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bidpJ...eature=related

    I'm watching them now!

    Thanks for posting this link! I really needed the information about the bobbin oil hole with the felt in it, for as I was cleaning my 3/4 Singer LaVincendora, I removed the old felt from the hole by error. It's good to see that you can refill the hole so easily, and no harm done!

  8. #33
    Muv
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    Aaagh! Sorry! I put in two = signs in each link instead of one!

  9. #34
    Member FirstQuilt's Avatar
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    On Sep 10 16:32:45


    AlwaysJustBeth wrote:
    Hi! My name is Beth and I'm new here. I'm not sure if this is where I write my post or not. LOL!!!
    I found this Board the other day while looking for something else and noticed the Vintage Machine section. I've been reading ever since.
    About 12 years ago I found my Singer treadle at a garage sale for $25.00. We put the belt on and it worked but I've never done anything with it.
    I cannot find out what kind it is. The serial number is 3149690 which makes year of issue 1879 but there is a panel next to the needle bar that says "Patented USA Aug 2nd 92".
    I meant to take pix earlier when it was light out but forgot.
    Shopped today for the cleaning items and a leather shoelace to replace the belt I broke last night (It was really brittle.)
    Thanks for the GREAT board!
    Beth


    Beth, I also have a Singer Treadle that says "Patented Aug 2nd 92." That is 1892. Mine has the serial number 3171412, which would make my machine 1879 by Singer lists. This machine is actually a Singer 9W, which is a Wheeler & Wilson machine. Singer took over Wheeler and Wilson around 1905 and until about 1910 they used Wheeler and Wilson parts -- until the Wheeler and Wilson parts were used up, to make the machines. That is why the serial numbers are so confusing -- those are Wheeler and Wilson serial numbers not Singer.

    I bet if you post a picture of your machine you will find that it is a Singer 9W like mine!

    Oh and the belts are very easy to come by from most sewing machine shops or order from Billy, who heads this forum.

    Nancy

    BoJangles

  10. #35
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    On Sep26,10 16:40:18 Lostn51 posted

    BoJangles wrote:
    Beth, I also have a Singer Treadle that says "Patented Aug 2nd 92." That is 1892. Mine has the serial number 3171412, which would make my machine 1879 by Singer lists. This machine is actually a Singer 9W, which is a Wheeler & Wilson machine. Singer took over Wheeler and Wilson around 1905 and until about 1910 they used Wheeler and Wilson parts -- until the Wheeler and Wilson parts were used up, to make the machines. That is why the serial numbers are so confusing -- those are Wheeler and Wilson serial numbers not Singer.

    I bet if you post a picture of your machine you will find that it is a Singer 9W like mine!

    Oh and the belts are very easy to come by from most sewing machine shops or order from Billy, who heads this forum.

    Nancy


    Nancy you might be on to something there. I thought about it being a 9W after I hit submit.

    We need to do a survey of the W9's that we know about and we can date them from a known machine. I know for a fact that mine is a 1910 (I forgot the month now) but if we can get enough numbers together and I can find the production numbers for the W9 then we might can build us a good reliable data base to work from.

    Billy



    “Don't worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done.”
    Philippians 4:6

    http://lostn51-vintagesewingmachineshop.blogspot.com/

  11. #36
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    On Sep 26, 10 18:50:08 BoJangles posted:

    AlwaysJustBeth wrote:
    Thanks Nancy and Billy. I tried random manuals online to see if I might find one that fit my machine. Didn't try too many tho. I was looking for a threading map. This machine doesn't have a bobbin case. The bobbin sits on a little post that folds onto the bobbin to hold it in place. Also wondering about needles. The one in it is broken and bent. I've not taken it out yet. Beth


    Ok Beth, now I am convinced your machine is actually a Singer 9W. The bobbin on the 9W just pops in and you have to fold the post in. I actually have a bunch of bobbins for my machine, but Billy could tell you if you need special bobbins or just ordinary ones. He probably has the bobbins if they are something special. Mine look pretty ordinary.

    As far as the needle, those machines take a special vintage needle that is like pulling teeth to find. I managed to find some on e-bay. You will need a 127X1 or Boye # 18 to use on that machine. Unfortunately, the 9W do not take a normal/modern needle. Billy and I think Charlee are working on finding a low cost modern needle that will work on the 9W machines.

    I love my Singer 9W -- It threadles very nice, but also try to remember the wheel on the 9W machines turns the opposite of most other machines. You roll the wheel away from you to sew, not toward you like most treadles!

    Please post a picture!

    Nancy

    BoJangles

  12. #37
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    Sep 26, 10 19:02:45 BoJangles posted:

    BoJangles wrote:


    Very fun idea Billy, we already have your Serial number. If you know yours is a 1910, now you have Beth's Serial #3149690, my Serial # 3171412! I know Miz Johnny has some 9W's too! We have a good start!

    Nancy



    Billy if you know your machine is a 1910, are Beth and my machine's newer or older than yours?

    Nancy

    BoJangles

  13. #38
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    On September 26,10 19:05:52 Lostn51 posted:

    Yeah you definitely have the W9, you need to take a photo of the bobbin it takes. They had 2 different bobbins depending on the machine that was used. The Wheeler & Wilson badged machines used one then the Singer cast ones used another. Both of them take the "Bagel" type of bobbin.

    Billy



    “Don't worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done.”
    Philippians 4:6

    http://lostn51-vintagesewingmachineshop.blogspot.com/

  14. #39
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    On Sep 26, 10 19:10:59 Lostn51 posted:

    BoJangles wrote:
    BoJangles wrote:


    Very fun idea Billy, we already have your Serial number. If you know yours is a 1910, now you have Beth's Serial #3149690, my Serial # 3171412! I know Miz Johnny has some 9W's too! We have a good start!

    Nancy



    Billy if you know your machine is a 1910, are Beth and my machine's newer or older than yours?

    Nancy


    I will have to go out there and look at mine, its in the Studio. The ones that were made out of left over W&W stock all have W in front of the number. If it is just a number then you have a Singer cast machine. But this was a short lived machine for the fact of that none of the parts interchanged with anything else Singer had. If you notice a lot of the parts that fit a 1906 Singer will fit a 1956 Singer and later. The engineers made sure of the interchangeability of the parts between different models that they made.

    Billy



    “Don't worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done.”
    Philippians 4:6

    http://lostn51-vintagesewingmachineshop.blogspot.com/

  15. #40
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    On Sep 26, 10 19:23:18 Miz Johnny posted:

    Lostn51 wrote:
    Yeah you definitely have the W9, you need to take a photo of the bobbin it takes. They had 2 different bobbins depending on the machine that was used. The Wheeler & Wilson badged machines used one then the Singer cast ones used another. Both of them take the "Bagel" type of bobbin.

    Billy


    The two I have take FW bobbins.

    Miz Johnny

  16. #41
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    On May 11, 10, 6:35:55 Charlee posted:

    We had some posts in the Vintage Machine thread about needles for the W&W 9 (and D-9), and the Singer 9W. The "original" needles for those machines are the same, and they're obsolete. Tougher to find than hen's teeth, those needles are!

    I got an email from a yahoo group I belong to, and I was thrilled when Kevin Pinkerton suggested these solutions! I wrote and asked him for permission to share with everyone here, and he's graciously granted it, with a postscript that I'll also share! Nice guy, that Kevin!!

    Original email follows:

    As far as the 127x1 needles. I have found an alternative which works for me
    and at least one other person. It is readily available and cheap. The
    industrial round shank needle is smaller in diameter and will slide up in
    the needle bar. Except for the shank being round instead of flat, all the
    other dimensions are the same as the 127x1 needle. Being a round shank
    needle, you will need to orient the needle yourself, but that can be done
    fairly easily.

    The needle goes by the following identifications:

    Schmetx 34:22 1
    MY1014B
    SMx1014B
    SY7256
    SMX1014A
    SM1014B

    You can get this needle from Schemtz, Groz-Beckert and Organ.

    The W&W 9 is a very nice machine and one of my favorites. If anyone has a
    D-12, long bed version of this machine (head only) that they want to part
    with, please let me know.

    The follow up email with additional information after I asked his permission to share is this:

    Hi Charlee,

    I have no problems with sharing everything with everyone. But please add this note:

    After inserting a new needle, always turn the wheel by hand slowly and watch for any needle obstruction where the needle might hit the rotary hook or bobbin.

    The needle orientation is very important and I did not go into details on that but you can also add something for that as well. The scarf side of the needle, which is opposite of the thread groove side of the needle needs to be oriented exactly the same as it was for the 127x1. There is more to that, but it is easy to compare to get that right.

    These new needles actually shrink in toward the center in all dimensions so there should NOT be a problem with the needle being positioned differently and then hitting the hook or bobbin. But I do not want to be responsible for a busted or damaged hook! The gap between the hook and the needle will increase a bit with these new needles, but unless it causes skipped stitches then it is not a problem.

    Kevin


    Thanks Kevin...YOU ROCK!!

  17. #42
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    I bought four 10-needle packages of Schmetz MY1014B needles on eBay, as a substitute for the old 127x1 needles for my W&W No. 9. --10 needles each for 4 different weights of fabric. (The asking price was $8 per pack of 10; I offered $5 per pack which was accepted by the seller. I paid $70 for the W&W No. 9, and with shipping have invested almost $30 in these needles.)

    They match the length of needles in the old Boye wooden tube that was in the drawer of the machine; however, the Boye needles (if that is what they really are) all have a flat side for no-brainer insertion.

    I read someplace that the early W&W No. 9s like this one took a round shank needle, and later models took needles with one flat side. I'm still searching for the place on the internet where I read that. Makes sense, as the flat sided needle was probably a later patent.

    Some of the needles in the Boye tube have writing on the shank, too small for me to read without magnification.

    I'm still cleaning the cabinet on this W&W No. 9. I have ordered a new belt for the treadle, and will soon start carefully cleaning the head. (I've read in several places that the gold decals on the W&W No. 9 are particularly fragile.) Once clean, I'll insert a new Schmetz needle, see how it goes, and report back.

    The trick will be to get Billy's "timing" right. I think he meant "orientation." See earlier post.

    Modern Schmetz MY1014B Needles
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  18. #43
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    This W&W No. 9 has a gold decal on the arch of the treadle base that matches the decal on the sewing machine. Neither has "BRIDGEPORT, CONN. USA" on the decals on later machines, including the W&W No. 9 "D-9"

    The irons were so black on this old treadle machine that at first the decal on the base did not even show up -- not a glint. But when I started rubbing with GoJo and a cotton ball, the decal became apparent. I stopped cleaning when I started getting diminishing results.

    The cabinet was cleaned with Murphy's Oil Soap and 0000 steel wool. Howard Restor-A-Finish was applied, sometimes with the steel wool. I ironed the veneer a bit. Then a finishing coat of Howard Feed-N-Wax was applied. I still have the coffin top to restore, and I am starting to tackle the machine head --slowly and carefully.

    The cleaned cabinet
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    The lower decal magically appeared.
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  19. #44
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    What a beautiful cabinet- I love the beaded fretwork on the front. It reminds me of old country houses. You are a very patient person to clean this machine so carefully. I'm glad you found it.

  20. #45
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    Very nice ...I have just taken out of the barn a W & W ,W- 9....it was left by a renter and in the barn for 16 years I have cleaner it up and now I need to find needles. The ones in the draw were to big, and the ones mom have are to small. mine are flat and moms are round. I am going to keep looking for something that will fit....I will try the MY1014B.................Diane

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstQuilt View Post
    Here's the new-to-me Wheeler & Wilson No. 9 with serial number 80018. I found the glass presser foot in the drawer, gave it a quick polish and put it on. I'm going to go slowly with the cleaning, and once I'm finished, I'm making a quilt with it. It's my dream machine.

    I'd like to hear about any experiences you might have with this machine!

    Wheeler & Wilson No. 9 (#80018)
    Attachment 246245

    Glass Presser Foot, patent date 1861
    Attachment 246246
    Here's the WW9 Glass presser foot---learn something new every day.
    Jon

  22. #47
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    I just wanted to say that I also have a newly aquired w&w9 but mine is in what they call a drawing room cabinet, I sort of collect sewing machines, some are parts machines, tho I have a couple of treadles that look like yours does. I really haven't had enough time yet to explore the inside of the cabinet, I got the machine raised up for useability & I thought thats all I needed todo besides put the belt on it but the treadle is really stiff so I thought, i'll put it back down inside its cabinet, & it wouldn't play nice. so now its gona stay there till I can down on my hands & knees & see what makes it tick. mine has a last listed patent date of 1890 serial #94012 i think it was. Anyway if by chance you come across any info about a drawing room cabinet for one of these machines I'd greatly appeciate if you could pass it on to me. I'd like to restore it if posible. my e-mail address is [email protected] & yours looks really cool. I'd really enjoy seeing your first quilt. my other treadles are blocked into unusable space, or being used as a place to set a printer up on, with my internet dsl modem & what not on it shame on me. and thank you for any help or info you can provide, good luck with your quilt

  23. #48
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    chicnhok,

    Welcome to the Quilting Board forum.

    Open your cabinet, raise that machine and get some Tri-Flow oil. Then oil it well. Oil the bearing parts of the treadle too.
    That will reduce the friction greatly.
    I've got two of the Singer 9W-7s and when cleaned and oiled they are very easy to turn. No effort at all.

    Tri-Flow is available at Sew-Classic parts and most or many bicycle shops.

    Clean the body with sewing machine oil and soft clothes or cottons balls to avoid damaging what's left of the machines finish and decals.

    Joe

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