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Thread: Polycotton

  1. #11
    Super Member luckylindy333's Avatar
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    I don't like polycotton because I think that it ravels too much. Maybe there are some better quality that does not ravel, but I have always used 100% cotton. It just seems softer and feels better to me.

  2. #12
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Me and a lot of my volunteer quilters use Poly-cotton for Project Linus quilts, especially for backings. It stands all the laundering and hard wear it is going to get also it is soft against the kiddie-winks skin.

    I am making myself special top sheets with thin cotton batting and a quilted top but using my poly-cotton sheet as the backing, sashing n binding, it looks OK to me.

  3. #13
    Junior Member Toni-in-Texas's Avatar
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    I read a lot about quilting the "traditional" way. There seems to be some unwritten rules about what you have to use and how you have to do the sewing when you make a quilt, 100% cotton, certain thread count, cotton thread (usually more expensive) cotton batting, etc. At one time "real" quilts were only the ones that were hand quilted.

    Now, don't get me wrong, I like to use 100% cotton fabric, too. But I also use good quality cotton-poly (60-40) fabrics because that's either what I already have from many years of sewing clothes or that's what I can afford at the time. Our ancestors made quilts with what they had. Sometimes they even made quilts with used clothing scraps. They pieced them by hand because they didn't have sewing. machines. They used cotton batting or wool because that's what they had.

    Now we have quilting machines and fancy sewing machines, rotary cutters, mats and all the bling that go with the quilting. But we should still be able to use what we want to when we make our quilts. There shouldn't be any quilt police to tell us what to do. That seems to take all the fun out of what we all love to do. Sorry I'm so long-winded, but I saw a young woman completely lose hope in ever making a quilt because of the criticism of a family member and the ladies in my group were unable to repair the damage that criticism did.

  4. #14
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    I totally agree with Toni-in-Texas!! Who decided what a traditional quilt was anyway? LOL.. They were made from what was at hand to help keep warm in winter and covered lightly in summer. To help promote privacy and modesty when seperate sleeping quarters were often not possible.
    I gurantee no one questioned the maker on what materials they used nor snickered behind their hands and shook their heads if it was tied rather than stitched.
    If I am going to join the ranks of quilters, I want to be one of those practical homemaking persons who used the old clothing, the sheet with a hole in it and the leftovers from the kitchen curtains in my quilts. I'll let others be the traditional quilters who quilted for show and decided that there were rules and what those rules were.
    I'm just a downhome country girl! Always was, always will be. Smiles, hugs and happy quilting!!!

  5. #15
    Senior Member Elfi2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildyard
    I totally agree with Toni-in-Texas!! Who decided what a traditional quilt was anyway? LOL.. They were made from what was at hand to help keep warm in winter and covered lightly in summer. To help promote privacy and modesty when seperate sleeping quarters were often not possible.
    I gurantee no one questioned the maker on what materials they used nor snickered behind their hands and shook their heads if it was tied rather than stitched.
    If I am going to join the ranks of quilters, I want to be one of those practical homemaking persons who used the old clothing, the sheet with a hole in it and the leftovers from the kitchen curtains in my quilts. I'll let others be the traditional quilters who quilted for show and decided that there were rules and what those rules were.
    I'm just a downhome country girl! Always was, always will be. Smiles, hugs and happy quilting!!!
    :-) :D :-D :lol: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :wink:

  6. #16
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    I have seen poly cotton quilts that seem to have bearded more than cotton. Not sure if that is always true

  7. #17
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfi2
    Quote Originally Posted by wildyard
    I totally agree with Toni-in-Texas!! Who decided what a traditional quilt was anyway? LOL.. They were made from what was at hand to help keep warm in winter and covered lightly in summer. To help promote privacy and modesty when seperate sleeping quarters were often not possible.
    I gurantee no one questioned the maker on what materials they used nor snickered behind their hands and shook their heads if it was tied rather than stitched.
    If I am going to join the ranks of quilters, I want to be one of those practical homemaking persons who used the old clothing, the sheet with a hole in it and the leftovers from the kitchen curtains in my quilts. I'll let others be the traditional quilters who quilted for show and decided that there were rules and what those rules were.
    I'm just a downhome country girl! Always was, always will be. Smiles, hugs and happy quilting!!!
    :-) :D :-D :lol: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :wink:
    :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

  8. #18
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilrain
    I have seen poly cotton quilts that seem to have bearded more than cotton. Not sure if that is always true
    Question: What is bearded? That's a new term for me. Thanks in advance for an explanation. My first guess was from when the cat gets on it and it seems to have grown hair, but I think that happens equally with all quilts. :D

  9. #19
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    Thanks for all the input....I have made a few quilts with just PC and have had several compliments...maybe the majority of my friends aren't familiar with quilting

    this was made from the left overs of the quilt below...I was just wanting to play around with it...it received awards at the Fair
    Name:  Attachment-226766.jpe
Views: 7
Size:  50.1 KB

    I made this for a friend who had looked after our home for a spell....she loved it
    Name:  Attachment-226767.jpe
Views: 43
Size:  66.5 KB

  10. #20
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    Ditto from Helen in denver. Do whatever trips your trigger or floats your boat.

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