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Thread: Back pain

  1. #11
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    i have had numerous shoulder injuries from years of competitive sports and can easily suffer pain when i push to hard.

    i sew about 3-4 hours a day 6 days a week and i've had this schedule for about 8 years.

    i have my sewing platform high in relation to where my bottom sits in the chair. i also have a lengthy and wide sewing platform.

    i believe by having this set up i don't have to hunch down and forward to see my work, my shoulders aren't over extended, and i'm able to have my forearms fully supported - thereby taking some of the pressure off the shoulders and back.

  2. #12
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Here's a website that shows proper chair height for sewing and other tasks:

    http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/sewi...iondesign.html

    My machine is set into a cabinet. I have found that raising my chair as far as possible to allow my legs to fit under the machine results in my forearms being even with the table surface. That is basically what the OSHA site is recommending. It doesn't allow me to sew for 6 or 8 hours daily, but it does extend the amount of time I can spend sewing without waking up stiff and sore the next day. I could not quilt sitting down for more than 2 hours a day or so; standing up I can quilt twice that and still quilt the next day.

  3. #13
    Super Member chairjogger's Avatar
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    I too get that if I don't walk away every so often. I get too involved.

    My years at a drafting board, until I could adjust the thing at a very sever angle did the same thing. I think it has to do with posture ( hunch ) ..

    Good luck !

  4. #14
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    The sharp pain between the shoulder blades sends me to the Chiropractor. The dull pain in my lower back sends me to the freezer. Ice works better for me than heat. Sometimes I use the medicated pads to help with the pain.

    .....and excercise DOES help. It takes a bit for the body to adjust.

    Hope you feel better soon.

  5. #15
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    I like thermacare pads. They are fantastic and really loosen your muscles.

  6. #16
    Senior Member diannemc's Avatar
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    Wow thanks Prism99!! what a great website! Wish I had seen this years ago...By the looks of this I am sitting too low!!! My arms hang off the table....there is alot of things I have been doing wrong...Thanks everyone..going to get some of those pads to out on back too...

  7. #17
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    Being 5'2" and having a back that goes out more often than I do, I find that by putting 2 rubber door stops behind my machine to tilt it forward, a book about 3" thick under the foot control, and a 5" book under my left foot, I can sew for hours.


    This was the only way I could quilt a QS quilt for my 18 year old grandson. Having mild asperges he doesn't show a lot of emotion as a rule, but the look on his face, the tears in his eyes, and the hug, as well as not being able to stop saying "Thank You Nanna", made it all worthwhile.

  8. #18

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    Check your body alignment at your machine. Arms should be bent at a 45 degree at the elbow. Get a good chair with lumbar support and adjustment. Office supply stores have some good ones at a decent price. Another thing, move often. I have my ironing board on the opposite side of the room which forces me to get up and walk. These pains also happen to computer users. The body was made to move and work. The few seconds you loose by not pressing at the machine will pay back with feeling better in the long run.
    I learned the hard way after an auto accident. We sew better when we feel better. Take care. :thumbup:

  9. #19
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    i go thru that too. every so often i have to stop and move around. i find as i concentrate on sewing i must stiffen up

  10. #20
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    You might want to go over the ergonomics of your sewing area.

    I once took a quilting class by Harriet Hargrave and she spent quite a while at the beginning of the 2 day class on proper ergonomics. I was so impressed that when I got home I reviewed my sewing area. I went to a good office furniture store and luckily found the Herman Miller airlon [?spelling] chair didn't feel good with my body. I ended up getting a funny stool that is height adjustable and feels like I am sitting on a balance ball ... it almost forces me to sit properly. Well worth the cost.

    alice

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