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Thread: Caladiums - what to do with them in fall?

  1. #1
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    I bought two nice-looking caladium plants earlier this summer. Well they are not so nice looking now; they probably don't like the chilly temperatures now. (They live on my front porch.)

    Is there any point to trying to bring them in for the winter? I don't have any really sunny windows. So they probably would resent the low light levels.

    Or do I just toss 'em and buy new ones next spring?

  2. #2
    Power Poster blueangel's Avatar
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    I don't try to save mine. I haven't had any luck keeping them over.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lisanne's Avatar
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    Things cost money - why throw them out and spend more money to buy them all over again next year?

    Caladiums can be grown as houseplants, and they actually prefer partial or even full shade to grow.

    I think they have a seasonal cycle, so you may need to pot their corms (the things they grow from) and expect them to be inactive for a while. I think you need to keep them watered during this time. My memory on this is really hazy, sorry, but there should be info online.

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    I haven't had them for years, though from what I remember, they were very tender and were one of the first to be knocked flat, with the slightest frost. So knowing where you live ... get them in now before you lose them.

    I know folkds do bring them in, and winter them over. As for how to do it? ... ditto on the check online!!

  5. #5
    Super Member trisha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite Fabrics
    I bought two nice-looking caladium plants earlier this summer. Well they are not so nice looking now; they probably don't like the chilly temperatures now. (They live on my front porch.)

    Is there any point to trying to bring them in for the winter? I don't have any really sunny windows. So they probably would resent the low light levels.

    Or do I just toss 'em and buy new ones next spring?
    This is just one pot of mine that really flourished. The others we planted did the same except for the bulbs which did not even come up til August and we planted them in April.l
    Name:  Attachment-274040.jpe
Views: 21
Size:  56.8 KB

  6. #6
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    they generally are NOT sun plants...they are more tropical and like shady areas. You can bring them indoors if you have the space for them...if not put them on FREECYCLE in your area for somebody that might have the space!

  7. #7
    Senior Member ChaiQuilter's Avatar
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    I tried once to over-winter them - followed instructions and wrapped then in burlap and placed them in our unheated garage - all I wound up with were rotted caladium bulbs!

  8. #8
    Super Member cherrio's Avatar
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    you could take the bulbs out of the dirt, keep em dry and cool then replant in the spring

  9. #9
    Jim
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    Super Member Jim's Avatar
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    Caladiums are to be treated like Elephant ears, dahlias and cannas in our area...dig them up clean them off and store them inside in a cool dry area ...in a sawdust type medium or newspaper until spring

  10. #10
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    I have had success saving caladiums, calla bulbs, and dahlias every year with little effort. Cut the foliage off of the bulb and leave the bulb outside to dry out a little bit for a couple of days...do not wash all of the dirt off of the bulb..just brush away the dried dirt with your hand after the bulb has set out a couple of days..put the bulb in a brown grocery bag and loosely close over the top..i then put mine in the unheated cellar for the winter..in march/ april you will start to see the growth tips start..do not plant the bulbs until the growth points are about 1.4 in. you can leave the bulbs out of the bag once growth starts and watch the progress that way...when planted at first make sure the soil is moist but not wet. The process is the same for the calla but, the dahlias however need to experience one frost so that all of the foliage turns black, after that take the dahlias out of the pot, let them stay outside a couple of days to dry some, wipe the dirt off and add them to your grocery bag. most of the time i use separate bags for each plant, you do not want them piled tightly on top of one another this is how they rot. Each year the bulbs get bigger so each year your plant is more showy..and caladium bulbs are to me too expensive to be treated as an annual. But i warn you I am a plant-a-holic so I bring in and winter over in the house several hibiscus, passionflowers, fuchsia, and stephanotis. I hope this helps.

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