Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Now That The Growing Season Is Over What Do You Do With Your Garden?

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,211

    Now That The Growing Season Is Over What Do You Do With Your Garden?

    It has been years since I have had a garden. I know you're supposed to pull out the dead plants and turnover the dirt. What else needs to be done? My daughter has had her first garden and was asking. I googled it and all I seem to get is how to plant a fall garden!

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,011
    Blog Entries
    1
    If she has a way to shred leaves, they make a good winter mulch over the garden. If possible, you want to add grass clippings too. The green stuff helps the brown stuff break down. She probably does not want to just rake leaves over the garden; they tend to turn into dense, soggy mats that do not break down and have to be removed in the spring. With the shredded matter, you can just move it aside to make a planting hole.

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    20,444
    We cut all the old vines and stocks off and put them in the compost pile. We don't do anything else until we prepare the garden for planting in the spring. In the spring we rake all the old debris off the top and dig anything else that is left. We turn over the soil and rack it smooth for planting.

  4. #4
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    6,882
    Blog Entries
    31
    I just remove the dead vegetation and put it in a composter and then along with SHREDDED LEAVES, I like to add some well rotted manure and or compost depending on what I can get, a few inches thick, over the top of the soil and let it decompose over the winter and leach into the ground. Then in Spring I turn the whole of it, over into the soil.

    It can take several years to develop a great soil and once you get there, the work becomes minimal to maintain.

    Enjoy the work for great results.
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  5. #5
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    7,616
    I grow a lot of herbs and have been very lucky to have them overwinter by covering lightly with leaves from a maple tree. Vegetable plants get cut off at ground level and then the tops are left to lay on top of the ground until Spring when the ground is cleaned and turned over to start again. I get lots of volunteer tomato plants that often add to the newly planted tomato plants. I've even had this happen with eggplant. You can probably deduct that I am a lazy gardener, but I also use only natural substances on my garden, no insecticides and pesticides.
    Make it a scrappy happy day!

  6. #6
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    16,447
    Blog Entries
    1
    I garden in pots, i'll pull out the last of the carrots and give them to the bunnies. everything else, ileave in the garden for the faries to eat. I live in a condo, so maintance takes care of the common area outside our fence and patio deck.

  7. #7
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    790
    In our suburban garden, we cover it with shredded leaves and lawn clippings. My sister & bil have very large gardens and use a winter cover crop. Google winter cover crop with your state to find out what to plant. All of this gets turned over in the spring.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lebanon Missouri
    Posts
    2,360
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    I just remove the dead vegetation and put it in a composter and then along with SHREDDED LEAVES, I like to add some well rotted manure and or compost depending on what I can get, a few inches thick, over the top of the soil and let it decompose over the winter and leach into the ground. Then in Spring I turn the whole of it, over into the soil.

    It can take several years to develop a great soil and once you get there, the work becomes minimal to maintain.

    Enjoy the work for great results.
    peace
    This is how our family has always done it and if you happen to live in a drought stricken area it also helps retain the winters moisture. Once the weather lets you get out to plow all this under then we spread our compost over it to sit a few more weeks. Then just before planting time the dirt is turned once more then apprx a week later the plants can go in.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Kodiak, Alaska
    Posts
    86
    I only have a greenhouse. I pickle my green tomatoes that aren't going to ripen. PM me for a very easy on the counter recipe if you want it. I pull out the tomato stalks and green bean plants that are done and compost. All I have left are two broccoli and two cabbage plants that I am hoping will do something with the cooler weather. Now the greenhouse is firewood storage for the winter. Outside I put dry seaweed on top of flower beds to protect the perennials underneath. Some goes into the soil and some gets raked off in the spring. Lots of good stuff in seaweed for the soil.

  10. #10
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Quilting, crocheting, sewing and crafting in my Sewing Room...Peaceful and wonderful !!
    Posts
    4,532
    Oh may have to try the seaweed. Does it work on roses...

    I am going to plant garlic, onions for over the winter in one raised bed .. then the others I am going to fertilize for over the winter and have it ready for spring planting.
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
    Words and hearts should be handled with care-for words when spoken and hearts when broken are the hardest things to repair. Author unknown to me
    Do what you feel in your heart to be right; for you'll be criticized anyway-Eleanor Roosevelt

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.