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Thread: Repairing a Blankie

  1. #1
    Super Member
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    Repairing a Blankie

    My grandson has one of those little square blankets that has a rubbery corner for teething, Pooh Bear, and. Crinkly corner. He's five and has carried this around since he was about 9-10 months. I've hand sewn repairs to the Pooh Bear, and glued/sewn the rubbery corner. The rubbery corner finally fell off completely. Do I dare try to sew the rubbery piece with my machine? In total it's probably about 1/2" thick.

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    If your machie is pretty heavy duty it might work. I did one by hand with a leather needle. Not fun, but some things MUST be saved.

  3. #3
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    Why is it..some things SEEM so easy & turn out ..not so!! My son (32) has a favorite quilt (bought in Vermont..NOT MOMS!!) but..his dog would scratch a nest when in bed, and torn a few of the blocks. Well, he asked if I could repair it..SURE!..there were a LOT of torn blocks..and what a job to repair. So, I thought it would be easier to make a 'new duplicate'..Turns out the pattern was easy, but the quilt was KING!! size and ,since his 'MOM' made it he doesn't want to use it, it's now hanging as his headboard!! Your 'repair' story, just reminded me of this..my 'little boy & his blankie'

  4. #4
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I think that rubbery stuff has to be extremely tough in order to meet safety standards for teething kids. My hunch would be that no home sewing machine would be happy with it, and it just might break a needle or throw off your timing. Maybe it's time for the young man to create a special memory/treasure box to store those precious parts!

  5. #5
    Super Member jeaninmaine's Avatar
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    Maybe take it to a place that repairs shoes and has strong machines to go through thick stuff like that. Just make sure the thread is safe to chew.

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I've not seen that material, but the earlier poster who mentioned that it has to be strong enough for teething made a very good point. I'd take it to an upholstery shop and see if they could reattach it with one of their machines. I have 6 machines, and a couple of them are workhorses, but I would not risk it.

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