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Thread: Accurate piecing without IDT/dual feed?

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    Accurate piecing without IDT/dual feed?

    I know many of you do your piecing on machines without dual feed or IDT. Do you have any tips on getting accurate feed for piecing? I had a Pfaff 2046, so am used to having IDT, but it had become temperamental so I just replaced it with a Bernina 530. I was piecing some lonnng pieces last night for my quilt back and the top fabric was feeding noticeably slower than the bottom fabric. Is there something I can do to help with this? I was using the straight stitch plate, foot 57, and the standard stitch length (2.4 I think).

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    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I have never used a dual feed foot to piece. You can try lowering the amount of pressure on your presser foot a bit. Also, I always use pins when piecing those llloooooong pieces.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    I have never used a dual feed foot to piece. You can try lowering the amount of pressure on your presser foot a bit. Also, I always use pins when piecing those llloooooong pieces.
    thamks, I'll try to reduce to presser foot pressure. I did put pins in, that's how I knew I was having problems. every time I got to a pin, I would have too much of the top fabric.

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    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Yes, before I got a machine with an automatic dual feed (Janome with "accufeed") I was piecing using a regular 1/4" foot on my Husky. I was piecing a lot of looooong strips (30" or so) for the "Omigosh" quilt.

    The best method I came up with was to use a glue stick, run a thin line down the edge of one piece, stick the other one to it (and if it's off a bit you can easily lift and replace) then take it to the machine. I HATE using pins so that glue stick was a huge time saver and accuracy tool for me.

    You do NOT need to heat set before sewing when you use a glue stick (you do need to heat set if you use liquid elmers glue).

    When it's sewn, iron down the seam first and that will "dry" the glue stick. If you applied the stick a little too heavy and it glued the wrong side of the seam line, ironing the seam while still closed will make it easier to separate the seams. I then finger separate first to make sure that no part of the fabric is stuck together at the seam line before I iron the seam open.

    I had zero *creep* of the top fabric when I got the end of the strip.

    I used a few different glue sticks on several projects, and have not had a problem with it washing out of the fabric. Currently I am using a brand by Avery. But I DO suggest that which ever you purchase, test it first.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    If you prewash your fabric, starching the fabric before cutting will help stabilize it and reduce this problem. I don't prewash and find there is enough sizing in the fabric for my Bernina 1230. I piece without a walking foot and don't even use the straight stitch plate.

    Love the glue stick idea; might try that myself!

    Meanwhile, though, another technique that helps even out the feed is to hold the strips together above the presser foot. You can pin, but when doing this I just eyeball. For example, if you are sewing two 42" strips together, you place the strips under the presser foot and do a couple of stitches to start. Smooth the two strips out together for about 12", pinch them together in your hand, and feed to the presser foot from above. This places a little extra stress on the bottom layer and a little less stress on the top layer, which tends to even out the feed.

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    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    I have never used a dual feed foot to piece. You can try lowering the amount of pressure on your presser foot a bit. Also, I always use pins when piecing those llloooooong pieces.
    Ditto this. Also make sure you are neither pushing nor pulling the fabric under the needle.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    Super Member TexasSunshine's Avatar
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    I nearly always use the IDT engaged with my older Pfaff and it still sews like a dream. (Bought in 1986)
    Texas Sunshine, piney woods of NE Texas

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    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I do like Prism99 said and I don't have any problems. I just use a regular foot.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

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    Member Beulah's Avatar
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    I think you need a walking foot. I am a Pfaff user myself - have two. However, most of the women in my Guild have a Bernina and use the walking foot.

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    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Just thought of something else that I learned from Sally Collins.

    If you still plan on pinning ... insert pins both perpendicular to and parallel to the seam line. This helps stop fabric creep.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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