Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 57

Thread: Advice for recreating a heavy tied old fashion style quilt

  1. #21
    Junior Member Altairss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    265
    I would look for old flannel shirts at the thrift, I regularly see those colors at ours you can get a lot of squares out of a single mens shirts. Also look at the flannel pillow cases. My local store just had a bunch of really nice heavy duty flannel pillow cases which would allow you to get several colors and styles I buy them sometimes for rag quilts as they are soft and warm and so much better quality then most flannel you can buy. they run around 2-3 dollars at my area stores per king size pillow case.

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    560
    Mens casual shirt make a heavy quilt. I was surprised at how heavy a twin size top I made.
    Singer 66 treadle, Singer 15-91, JC Penney 6923, Kenmore 50, White 2334, Brother 920D serger. RIP Singer 1036

  3. #23
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    4,998
    My grandmother used to make quilts that looked like this....and she always tied them in red. Nice memory. My father used to sell custom made suits, and some of her quilts were made from fabric samples Dad would have left over when new fabrics came out. Those were really heavy quilts, as I think she also used army blankets as batting. The goal was to keep warm, like someone has already said.

    Of course, I wouldn't use suit fabric nowadays. Flannel might be a nice choice though. If you make it as close as you can to that picture, he will be very pleased....and slightly larger squares would be just as pleasing to him, and quicker to make.

    I hope you end up enjoying the project. It looks like fun.

    Dina

  4. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Snowy Minnesota
    Posts
    1,263
    Denim and/or corduroy will be your friend. It's heavy, durable, washable, and cheap if purchased at a thrift store. I made a quilt for my daughter out of heavy cotton denim (one side) and flannel (other side) squares, and it has the kind of weight your client is asking for.

    While mine was a rag quilt, yours could be something else. What I learned is that if you put denim on one side of a quilt, something softer (like flannel or regular cotton fabric) on the other, with cotton batting in between, you get a nice heavy quilt.
    As much as I hate it, my seam ripper is my best friend.

  5. #25
    Super Member EmiliasNana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,214
    I have a layer cake called Woolies Flannel by Bonnie Sullivan for Maywood that would be perfect and manly. All suit like flannels. Could incorporate into your stash as it looks like recycled clothing like Grandma would have used.

    My grandma used wool 2" thick batts from Wisconsin and tied hers also.

  6. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Davenport, Iowa
    Posts
    1,021
    I repaired a tied scrappy quilt for my then boyfriend (husband now) that was made by his grandmother. Poor woman really couldn't sew, but she made it out of love. It had not one but two wool blankets used as batting. Heaviest darn thing I've ever worked on. He still loves it...we use it when the electric goes out in the winter.

  7. #27
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Arlington, MN
    Posts
    1,465
    My very first quilt was made when I was in my teens (45 years ago - yikes). I cut triangles using leftover fabric from sewing projects ( my mom and I both sewed clothes). Cut them all using a cardboard template into triangles, then sewed them together. Anyway when it became quite worn, I covered it with new fabric and this old remade quilt is still on our bed and going strong. As far as I'm concerned, do what works for you.
    Last edited by Karamarie; 04-19-2017 at 04:22 AM. Reason: Error

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    711
    I think I would use denim and flannel as the squares.

  9. #29
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    776
    If a sheet is added to the back, it will be more washable and yet still heavy?

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    332
    I think the best way to keep it affordable will be to find an already made quilt top. Maybe a vintage unfinished top. This way I would save on piecing time, and only charge for the batting, backing material and time for finishing. How about a vintage polyester top? Those are cheap, durable and colorful.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.