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Thread: Asking the great Machine Applique Goddess'

  1. #1
    Panther Creek Quilting's Avatar
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    I am going to have a try at machine applique. I have been practicing sewing curves, dip and didos. I think I mught have it down enough to start something.

    Questions:

    1. If sewing a white applique to blue background do I use white thread or Blue thread. White will blend the hook part of the stitch on the top of the applique, but may show the smal stitches right next to the applique. In general I would assume that you match the thread to the applique piece, Correct?

    2. When putting white on top of colored fabric do you do anything extra to keep the white from showing through?

    I would also appreciate any other tips. This will be my frist attempt.

    Thanks

    Sheila

  2. #2
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    I am not the applique queen but I would use monofilament thread if either blue or white doesn't work. After applique, cut out the blue from behind.

  3. #3
    Panther Creek Quilting's Avatar
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    I am using wonder under. Does that mean I only put the wonder under around the edge of the applique piece so that i can trim out the middle? I really am an applique newbie, so sorry if the questions sound silly.

    Sheila

  4. #4
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    I always cut out the center of my fusible, it makes it less stiff and I use the smaller piece of wonderunder for other pieces. Then you should be able to cut out the blue. Cut out the centers of course on the wonderunder before you fuse and leave about a quarter inch edge. (Ask me how I know!!!)

  5. #5
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I am not the queen either, but have done some of it. There are a few things you have to think about in advanced:

    Which stitches are you using to applique. You can use a zig zag, invisible hem stitch, blanket or double blanket stitch, but you can also use a decorative stitch.

    If you want your stitches to be hidden, use the smallest stitch possible and use thin thread, the same color of the applique.

    You may want your stitches to show, in this case you can use a thread that contrast your fabrics rather than matching, use a larger stitch, and a thicker thread.

    Wonder under or any other fusible will make your applique stiff. If you are making a wallhanging, it may not matter, so you can use it under the entire surface. If you want your quilt to be flexible, it may be a good idea to just use it on the edge of the applique. I have also used liquid stitch. Apply to the edge of the applique. when is dry, heat set in place with the iron and then decorate the edge, or use any stitch you want to use to applique.

  6. #6
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    There are several different types of machine applique. It sounds as if you are doing fusible with a blind hem stitch, correct?

    It is best to cut out the middle of the fusible for less stiffness in the applique. However, when you do this, it is not necessary to cut out the background fabric afterwards. That is usually done with freezer paper machine applique in order to remove the freezer paper.

    Fusible applique with a blind hem machine stitch is usually done with two strands of black thread to mimic old-fashioned hand sewing stitch. This stitching is purely decorative, since it won't necessarily keep the cut fused edges from raveling in the wash.

    I agree that using YLI nylon monofilament or similar thread would keep the stitches from showing; however, I'm not sure what the purpose would be. Monofilament is used for invisible machine applique done with freezer paper, which creates a turned edge similar to hand applique. In that case, the stitching is necessary to fix the applique to the background. Blind-hem stitching around a fusible is primarily decorative, as I mentioned above, so ordinarily you would want the stitches to show.

    If you want to completely cover the fused edges to prevent raveling, you can use a satin stitch. When using a satin stitch, however, you have to either heavily starch the background fabric or use a stabilizer under the background fabric to prevent "tunneling".

    For a fusible whose edges are not going to be satin stitched, in my experience Steam-a-Seam is the best fusible because it is less likely to ravel at the edge.

    I don't use fusibles very often. I prefer invisible machine applique using freezer paper.

    Usually it is a good idea to back a white piece with another layer of fabric (or even a layer of thin batting) so the background color doesn't show through. Whites in particular seem to shadow through, especially when the background is dark.

    Edit: Oh, come to think about it, cutting out the background fabric underneath the white would probably have a similar result.

  7. #7
    Panther Creek Quilting's Avatar
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    Prism - Thank you so much for your explanation. I am trying the fusible method but think i want the invisible machine applique. Could you possibly explain that methos further?

    Sheila

  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I do a whole lot of raw edge fusible applique. I have always used Wonder Under and I never cut out the background behind the applique. I use a straight stitch and invisible thread and stitch about a 16th of an inch from the edge. When you use invisble thread the spool needs to be upright and the thread needs to come off the side of the spool.

    The other technique I use is black blanket stitch. My machine has a nice blanket stitch and it really gives your applique a nice folk art look. The Wonder Under is enough there is no need for an additional stabilizer.

  9. #9
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panther Creek Quilting
    Prism - Thank you so much for your explanation. I am trying the fusible method but think i want the invisible machine applique. Could you possibly explain that methos further?

    Sheila
    I have never used invisible machine applique with fusible, but it looks as if Scissor Queen has given you some good directions on that.

    I have always used YLI monofilament for invisible machine applique (based on Harriet Hargrave's advice in her books). A lot of people seem to prefer the newer polyester invisible thread. I have a spool of that, but haven't tried it yet. It seems much heavier to me than the YLI monofilament.

  10. #10
    Senior Member adriansmom's Avatar
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    Sometimes I use a piece of stabilizer so that fabric doesn't show through the white.

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