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Thread: Does anyone use a serger to do their quilt piecing?

  1. #1
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    Question Does anyone use a serger to do their quilt piecing?

    I have been piecing a quilt that has lots of intersecting seams from all directions haha and which quilt doesn't have that haha...but some of my aunts seemed to think I should try using a serger to do some of my piecing that has large block patterns, as I love large blocks more then tiny piecing blocks haha...does anyone else use a serger for piecing that way you don't have to do all that pressing and its faster? I don't have a serger but toying with getting a used one to see how it goes..? Thanks
    LIVE ~ LAUGH ~ LOVE

  2. #2
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    I don't have a serger, but I don't think I could piece my quilt with it. Unfortunately, I have to take out too many seams and if the fabric is gone......then what would I do? I guess I would have to re-cut the block....not fun to me.

  3. #3
    Senior Member maryb44662's Avatar
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    I have used my serger to piece and it works very well, especially on flannel. It keeps the fabric from fraying so much. On all my quilts, I serge around the whole quilt before attaching the binding. Works well and the layers are all lined up well. I love my serger and use it when ever possible as it is much faster. I plan on making a quilt out of double knit fabric (I have tons of it) and using the serger. I will see how it works out.
    MaryB

  4. #4
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    I have seen quilts done with serger edges in the blocks. They used decorative thread and had them exposed on the top of the quilt. The problem with serging regular enclosed seams in quilt block is, the added bulk to the seams. This can cause trouble if a lot of seams meet in the same place. It can also Make the quilt difficult to hand quilt through but I imagine you could machine quilt through the seams.

  5. #5
    Super Member amyjo's Avatar
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    My mom used to use a serger to make her quilts. She used it on the polyester that she got and made for friends and grandkids and her great grand kids. She made well over 200 quilts with her serger. I sure miss her as I always gave her anything that I got with fabrics on auction sales and stuff I traded for and she made doll clothes also with her serger, only used 2 threads I think tho. They sure turned out nice. when my sisters were going through her sewing after she died, one thing she had labeled and that was a bag of Barbie doll clothes and dolls that she made for my granddaughters. The dolls and clothes stay at my house so they have something to play with when they come to visit.

  6. #6
    Super Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    Useing the serger would sure make the cost of quilting go up.serger use 3,4,5,or 6 threads. and cut off seam allows so if i mase up the peice would have to be recut more fabric. I do like the idea of serger the edge before binding and plan to try it on the next quilt but to go buy a serger for quilt NO WAY to costly. Serger are a great machine I use my a lot for some things but I have not found that it is quilting. "just my 2 cent will"
    Last edited by sweetpea; 04-02-2013 at 03:34 AM.
    Scrapy quilts have more love in them.

  7. #7
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    Great in theory! It would be a disaster for me! I'd probably have to re cut a dozen or more squares (at least!) from sewing the first ones wrong!

  8. #8
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
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    I think a serger would do nicely for a quilt with large pieces. The thread will add more weight to the quilt, but serger thread is a lot cheaper than the other threads we use for piecing. You sure wouldn't have to worry about seams coming out. I usually serge around the outer edge of my quilt top when I finish piecing it. I tend to be slow about getting them quilted and this keeps seams from pulling out. Go for it if its something you want to try.

  9. #9
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    Yes you can make a quilt using a serger. Eleanor Burn's used a serger on some of her earlier shows. Nancy Ziemen fron Sewing with Nancy uses a serger for a lot of her quilts.
    Check out The Quilt Show website, click on Bernina videoes in the upper left corner,then click on One Step Quilting. They show how to make a reversible quilt. In the video they are making a bookcover, but, the method can be used to make a quilt as well. A serger will work for large,less complicated patterns. I wouldn't use a serger on say a difficult block but for something simple like a Irish Chain, a Nine Patch etc it would work fine. The thing is, if you have a serger I would use it for some quilt patterns. If however you don't have one, I wouldn't go to the expense of buying one just for quilting. If you plan on making garments or home dec, a serger is wonderful. Also, it makes making a fleece blanket, a snap! It just depends on what you intend to create.

  10. #10
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Piecing with a serger is doable but the designs and patterns you can make are very limited. As previous posters said it typically cuts the fabric and would add bulk to seams, so the ones I've mainly seen are those with exposed seams that are finished. I've seen some cute, juvenile quilts made on some t.v. shows using a serger but it's not something I'm interested in doing with my serger. It's used for clothing in my house.

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