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Thread: Fabric storage and temperatures

  1. #1
    Senior Member sandybeach's Avatar
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    Fabric storage and temperatures

    Could someone please tell me if temperatures will have an adverse affect on fabric. I live in the Mojave desert where it goes from 15 degrees in the winter to 115 in the summer. I want to store some of my "kits" that are stored in plastic shoe boxes out in the garage, but I don't want them to be damaged. Any advise?

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    get them out of the light, out of the plastic and out of the heat...in that order... they are natural fibers and will rot, especially if they get any dampness inside that plastic...that's the real killer...

  3. #3
    Senior Member sandybeach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deemail View Post
    get them out of the light, out of the plastic and out of the heat...in that order... they are natural fibers and will rot, especially if they get any dampness inside that plastic...that's the real killer...
    I did plan to put them inside a cabinet so they will be out of the light completely. And, of course, there is NO humidity here. I guess I could take them out of the plastic shoe boxes and put them on old sheets on the shelves inside the cabinet. Do you think that would work?

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    it's definitely better, and remember, moisture happens, even in the desert...rapidly cooling temps at night when the inside temp in the boxes will create condensation...and all it needs is a few minutes...the cotton fabric will absorb the moisture immediately...the moreso because the fabric is REALLY dry.... look around, isn't there something else you use only periodically that you could put out there and use that space for fabric storage in the house. It really isn't good for it. put your bed up a bit higher...they sell these 'can' looking things that boost it about six inches...then covered boxes could fit under the bed without losing any floorspace. If that is not practical and the garage is the only place you have, sure, the sheets will help...and ask all your friends to save the little humidity protection packets from their shoe boxes...sprinkle them all around the cabinet...they draw moisture to themselves so they get it first....

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    Senior Member sandybeach's Avatar
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    Thanks deemail, those are great ideas.

    Sandy

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    I have no idea what temps fabric does well at. I just figure if it's comfortable for me, it's good for my fabrics. I think if I was looking for storage out in the garage, I would move all my scraps out there before my quilt kits. Since you live in the desert, I don't think you would have too many problems if you put them in containers that could breath. Maybe wrap the fabric in an old sheet and put into cardboard boxes. Mark on your calender when you put them out there and check on them monthly?

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    Critters might be something else to worry about! Stored fabric in footlockers outside on patio, covered by tarp from rain, etc. (Live in So CA) It wasn't the weather that got to the fabric. Somehow mice(?) chewed holes in the fabric. The footlockers were in good condition, but when you push slightly on the sides, it gives slightly. So, guess they really can squeeze in anywhere they want.

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    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I think the extremes in temps would cause condensation in the plastic shoe boxes...It is very hot during day, but at night it cools down. I would really try to find a space in house for the fabric. Besides, critters might like that comfy fabric to nest in.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  9. #9
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Stick with what deemail advises...she's in AZ after all. Those dessicant thingies can be put right in with the fabric and it will help, too. A quilt appraiser suggested it to me for storage of my great-grandmother's quilts. They work here in the humid northeast, I know that much.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    believe me, it's just my opinion...i'm not in the 'real' Arizona...I live in the mountains, almost in New Mexico, and we are at 7000 ft and have about a foot of snow right now... I got militant because i have a real problem with storing anything in plastic.....it's just the worst for fabrics... good luck, i hope you find a solution for you....

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