Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: FMQ meander question

  1. #1
    Senior Member annesthreads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    936
    After spending lots of time talking about FMQ, reading about FMQ, even practising FMQ, I'm about to take a deep breath and actually put a quilt on the sewing machine :-)
    I'm just going to do a simple meander, but I need to ask an obvious question - where do I start?! Do I begin at the edge of the quilt and work across and down - or not?

  2. #2
    Super Member Qbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,167
    I was told to start in the middle. Take your time, relax and enjoy the process :D Good luck!!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Quilting Angel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    883
    Blog Entries
    1
    I just posted the exact same question.

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    13,233
    I was told to start in the middle and work out. Don't rush it!

  5. #5
    QM
    QM is offline
    Super Member QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    7,168
    In hand quilting or quilting on a regular machine, the general rule is inside to outside. on a LA, the general rule is from one corner across and back by rows to the far corner. Like all rules, there are exceptions.

    I do quite a bit of FMQ. Sometimes, the quilt seems to call for some non-FMQ gridwork. For example, on the NYB quilt I posted earlier this evening, I think I probably will do SITD along the block edges, then use FMQ within the blocks and on the borders. The advantage to this technique is that large areas are 'controlled' before I begin the FMQ.

    Since I often use different colors in quilting different areas, I used to do all of one color, then all of another. This led to some serious difficulties.

    BTW, my guild owns a LA, but I am now too disabled to stand and use it, so I generally do all my work on my Janome, even king-sized. Once in a while I have a guild sister do a meander in some parts, leaving the more interesting parts for me.

  6. #6
    Super Member Qbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,167
    What kind of Janome are you using for those big quilts?

    Quote Originally Posted by QM
    In hand quilting or quilting on a regular machine, the general rule is inside to outside. on a LA, the general rule is from one corner across and back by rows to the far corner. Like all rules, there are exceptions.

    I do quite a bit of FMQ. Sometimes, the quilt seems to call for some non-FMQ gridwork. For example, on the NYB quilt I posted earlier this evening, I think I probably will do SITD along the block edges, then use FMQ within the blocks and on the borders. The advantage to this technique is that large areas are 'controlled' before I begin the FMQ.

    Since I often use different colors in quilting different areas, I used to do all of one color, then all of another. This led to some serious difficulties.

    BTW, my guild owns a LA, but I am now too disabled to stand and use it, so I generally do all my work on my Janome, even king-sized. Once in a while I have a guild sister do a meander in some parts, leaving the more interesting parts for me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member quilticing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lake City, MI
    Posts
    580
    FYI: Any size quilt (up to 120")) can be done on a standard machine. I did a king SID on my old Singer years ago. Slow and steady wins the race.

  8. #8
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,692
    People have told you to start in the middle but not the reason... When you start in the middle you are quilting out any bumps, irregular spots or puckers as you go. I know, I know you don't have any of those in your work, but believe me if you were to quilt to the middle, you'd have one ugly mess in the center!

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,147
    yes, this way :)
    Quote Originally Posted by Qbee
    I was told to start in the middle. Take your time, relax and enjoy the process :D Good luck!!

  10. #10
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,400
    start in the middle, work your way out to an edge, turn quilt around go back to the middle and work out the other way, turn =back to middle; ect.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.