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Thread: Foundation piecing: Choice of paper

  1. #1
    Junior Member Ethel A's Avatar
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    For folks who do foundation piecing, do you buy special paper or are you successful with just regular copy / computer paper?

    If you buy special paper, what do you buy (what should you look for)? I need to make 100 copies of a log-cabin block and would like to take it to Kinko's for the copying. I would rather not spend too much money on the paper.

    If you use regular copy paper, is it easy to tear off once you've sewn all of your pieces together?

    Any other suggestions / tips? Thank you, in advance.

  2. #2
    Super Member zyxquilts's Avatar
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    I have successfully used regular copy paper for paper piecing Ethel. There are 2 tricks I use with it - first, I pre-fold all the lines before I sew on it. Second, if I have any trouble tearing it off, I spritz it with a little water, then it comes right off.
    Also, before you have Kinko's make all the copies, have them make one so you can check to make sure that it copies to the correct size. I know that when I use my copier at work, I have to set it to copy at 101% so the copies are right.

    I also use the thinner sandwich wrapper paper. Then, instead of photo-copying the pattern onto it, you can staple a bunch together (like 10 of them) at a time, then, stitch on all the lines of your pattern (without thread), using a long stitch length. So you would need to have 10 or so good copies to sew thru' to mark the others.

    And I always make sure I have extra copies too - just in case! :wink:

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I use regular 'ol copy paper and newsprint. :wink:

  4. #4
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    this is the paper i use. i like it because its vellum and you can see thru it and its easy to rip away from the fabric.


    http://webstore.quiltropolis.net/sto...3&Item_ID=1087

  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i buy pads of kids' doodle paper. they're made from blank newsprint. i can usually find them in dollar stores. they're usually bigger than letter size, so i have to trim them back if i want to run them through my regular printer, but the paper is the perfect weight and inexpensive.

  6. #6
    Super Member grma33's Avatar
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    I struggled with removing copy paper for years until someone here said they use tissue paper in their printer and it works!
    I had some a teacher had given me. Made a big difference.
    Gale

  7. #7
    Junior Member Ethel A's Avatar
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    I bought June Tailor Foundating Piecing Paper from Joann's when it was 50% off, and I had forgotten about it, until now. I took it to Office Depot. I ran one 'test' copy on regular paper, just to make sure the copied image was true-to-size (I had to reduce it by 99%).

    I placed the June Tailor paper in the bypass tray (this is a very important step). Don't put it in the regular trays below the copier, as this will force the paper to roll through many different rollers. When you place it on the bypass tray, it flows through the copier 'flat.'

    I was able to make all of the copies I desired. The paper DID NOT melt. Don't let the copy people tell you this. Yes, their machines do get hot, but this specific paper did not melt. It is not vellum. It's tissue-like paper.

    So, there you have it. If you don't want to use your printer ink and want to mass produce the pattern quickly, I would suggest just taking your paper to Office Depot (my local Kinko's refused to make copies for me, so I went to Office Depot, and they didn't mind running a test copy before running off the rest).

  8. #8

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    It is a change from paper for paper piecing, but to me, it is worth the little bit of expense with using Muslin. It gives a good backing and I have felt it might be a bit more accurate.
    I have used paper and just used the regular copy paper.
    I am going to try the Doodle Paper another quilter below mentioned.

    Paper Piecing really is fun!
    marta

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