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Thread: fusible fleece

  1. #1
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    fusible fleece

    Could someone tell me about the different types of fusible fleece and how you use them? Can they be used as batting, or as backing for quilts? I have used fleece for backing quilts; does fusible fleece work the same way? Which brand/type do you like the best?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member pattypurple's Avatar
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    I mostly use fusible fleece for making purses/bags. I tried it once for a small baby quilt and was very frustrated with it. I will only use it in small pieces.
    I Quilt Therefore I Am

    Pat

  3. #3
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    Fusible fleece is really wadding/ batting (polyester) with a fusible dotty bit on one side. It is like the fusible dots you get on regular iron on interfacing. It is a permanent bond. You use it for making things like Bags and home dec where you wan tthe wadding to stick to the fabric and may not be quilting. It isn't fleece material with a fusible on one side it is quite different and HAS to be enclosed or sewn in betweeen two layers of fabric.

    Hobs Fusible batting is the 80/20 blend with a temporary fusible on BOTH sides and is designed to help you when layering and basting. It has limitations as when you iron it you have to have both sides covered with the fabric and it is less easy to keep the top and backing rumple free. I only use this for small things where I can startch the backing to within an inch of it's life! Actually I don't use it much at all unless I happen to have some left overs. I would always rather use a regular batting and 505 spray which lets you do the two layers at different times thus allowing you keep the rumples at bay.

    I think there are two brands of fusible fleece: vilene which is a bit fluffy like cotton wool inbetween a firmer top and then the fusible back, but still a poly and then the pellon fusible fleece which is needle punched and firmer and flatter. i like both and use what I have available. Note that the pellon also comes in a NON fusible fleece so check when buying.

    Hope that helps.

    best becks

  4. #4
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I like the floriani fusible fleece best, it is thicker than the pellon and holds up nicer, but is more expensive

  5. #5
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    I have used Pellon fusible fleece when making bags and am not entirely happy with the results. I sometimes have trouble getting the fleece to stick. I think the next bags I make I will use the regular fleece since the pieces aren't real big or difficult to quilt.

  6. #6
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    I have a queen size piece of floriani fusible fleece that I'm not brave enough to use. Can you pm me and tell me how you use it. Is it suitable for a quilt. That's why I bought it but couldn't work out how I could possibly do that.

  7. #7
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewgarden View Post
    I have a queen size piece of floriani fusible fleece that I'm not brave enough to use. Can you pm me and tell me how you use it. Is it suitable for a quilt. That's why I bought it but couldn't work out how I could possibly do that.
    I'd love to see the response, so please post it rather than PMing. Thanks!

  8. #8
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    I use the Pellon Fusible fleece for purses and bags, tablerunners, candlemats and those types of things. One thing I did discover though, do not use steam when you press your fusible fleece, it will not stick as well as using a dry iron.

  9. #9
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Rose View Post
    I have used Pellon fusible fleece when making bags and am not entirely happy with the results. I sometimes have trouble getting the fleece to stick. I think the next bags I make I will use the regular fleece since the pieces aren't real big or difficult to quilt.
    You have to fuse the fleece with the fabric side up and the fleece underneath, so that the heat of the iron can get to the dots more easily.

    I really like the fusible fleece when making purses and bags, it adds body. I wouldn't use it in a quilt. I like "drapey" quilts and use Hobbs Heirloom batting mostly. I thread baste when I will be hand quilting, and pin baste when I will be machine quilting.

  10. #10
    Junior Member angelahen's Avatar
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    I used it once in a bag - not keen would prefer to layer up with pins

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