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Thread: Glad Press-n-Seal for FMQ, and another related question

  1. #21
    Senior Member Cogito's Avatar
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    Personally I will tell you my experience with using press and seal for another use and it was not positive. We had just installed a granite kitchen counter and the tile setter was coming the next day to set the back splash. Having never worked with him before I didn't know how careful he would be so I covered the counter with a 4" strip of the press and seal all along the counter, butted up to where he would be tiling. I was so proud of myself for coming up with such an ingenious idea! I thought "wow, this press and seal stuff is pretty cool and can be used in a lot of ways" I left it on about 24 hours, and then attempted to remove it. "Attempted" is the operative word! I had a heck of a time getting it all off. I finally managed, BUT it left a sticky residue that literally took me days to remove from the entire length of the counter! I will be very cautious about how I use it now. And it's just me but I would Never use it on my fabric knowing how it reacted to sticking to granite!

  2. #22
    Senior Member
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    Thank you, everyone for your experiences and insights. While it seemed like a good idea at first, with all of this feedback, I think I'll opt for a different product. Off to find Gold Threads

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    I like stencil designs for my quilting and am concerned about marking on my quilt top with many products-I want to avoid the horror stories some of you have had. I have used all kinds of paper to draw the designs with pencil which I know will disappear with washing the quilt. I have used rolls of paper I have gotten at the medical supply store. It is used on examining tables.It is very easy to remove from around stitches. I have also used tracing paper that comes on a large roll at the office supply store. It is less expensive than the golden paper at the quilt store. I also draw off one design and then stitch, with no thread, eight to ten copies of the design. Sometimes, choice is dependent on whether you are more concerned about your time or treasure.

  4. #24
    Senior Member MarthaT's Avatar
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    My biggest concern would be the fact that a permanent marker was used. If any residue is left, you have a black permanent mark on your quilt. Not sure I would go for that. Why not use a stencil and mark with a wash away marker or use a wash away or tear away that is designed for easy removal?
    Thimble and Thread

  5. #25
    Super Member
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    I've learned a lot from reading all the posts. Thanks to all who have posted.

  6. #26
    Super Member
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    I came across an old quit that had chalk marks on it (lots of them) so I tried a piece of felt like what they used on the old chalk boards. Came right out. Not sure how old the quilt was but the felt worked. I did work it up a little with an old makeup brush. Felt piece and brush have become part of my cleaning tools.

  7. #27
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    Sulky makes a product that rips away and any left over you just heat with your iron and it "melts" away. You do have to use a temporary adhesive to make it stick to the quilt. I don't remember the name, but I'm sure with a search you can find it.

    No gum up on the needle and bobbin case.

    Another trick I learned is taping paper with blue painters tape to the area for quilting. Just rip it off and what ever is left, it washes away.

    Or you can draw your design on tool (spelling) and using a chalk pencil trace your design. It leaves little marks.
    The Quilting Bear

  8. #28
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    Sometimes it is better to spend the money on a really good product. I love the water soluble stabelizer if I want to mark a FM pattern.

  9. #29
    Senior Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    My favorite, and economical, paper to use is parchment paper you use for baking. It is less fragile than tissue paper but you can still see through it to trace any design. It also rips away from the stitching fairly easily. I use Frixion pen to trace the design. They are made by Pilot and available at quilt stores but usually cheaper when purchased at office supply store. If any color transfers to the stitching it washes out but I rarely have color transfer. I work in sections and just pin the paper in place with safety pins. You don't need many pins.

  10. #30
    Super Member cpcarolyn's Avatar
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    I have never tried it and now I guess I never will. Thanks everyone for the info.

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