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Thread: Glad Press-n-Seal for FMQ, and another related question

  1. #26
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    I came across an old quit that had chalk marks on it (lots of them) so I tried a piece of felt like what they used on the old chalk boards. Came right out. Not sure how old the quilt was but the felt worked. I did work it up a little with an old makeup brush. Felt piece and brush have become part of my cleaning tools.

  2. #27
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    Sulky makes a product that rips away and any left over you just heat with your iron and it "melts" away. You do have to use a temporary adhesive to make it stick to the quilt. I don't remember the name, but I'm sure with a search you can find it.

    No gum up on the needle and bobbin case.

    Another trick I learned is taping paper with blue painters tape to the area for quilting. Just rip it off and what ever is left, it washes away.

    Or you can draw your design on tool (spelling) and using a chalk pencil trace your design. It leaves little marks.
    The Quilting Bear

  3. #28
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    Sometimes it is better to spend the money on a really good product. I love the water soluble stabelizer if I want to mark a FM pattern.

  4. #29
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    My favorite, and economical, paper to use is parchment paper you use for baking. It is less fragile than tissue paper but you can still see through it to trace any design. It also rips away from the stitching fairly easily. I use Frixion pen to trace the design. They are made by Pilot and available at quilt stores but usually cheaper when purchased at office supply store. If any color transfers to the stitching it washes out but I rarely have color transfer. I work in sections and just pin the paper in place with safety pins. You don't need many pins.

  5. #30
    Super Member cpcarolyn's Avatar
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    I have never tried it and now I guess I never will. Thanks everyone for the info.

  6. #31
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    I am a hand quilter and just finished a wedding quilt and wanted a huge heart and feathers in the center as my design. I found the pattern I wanted and took it to a local blue print copy place and had them enlarge it. I then traced my design onto washable interfacing , I used a little bit of glue stick to hold it in place. When I was finished with my quilting I just put it in the washer and everything washed out beautiful. I was a little leary of putting all the interfacing thru the washer so I cut out some of the larger pieces first. It washes up beautiful and you can also find the kind that is tear out if you are more comfortable with that. There are two different kinds, one is sort of plastic feeling on top similar to the press and seal and some are more woven which is what I used.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  7. #32
    Senior Member kat13's Avatar
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    I've used all of those papers and you need to have your stitches small to pull the paper off without pulling the stitches out. I did hear that they now make a paper that is water soluable..how perfect is that! I haven't found it yet tho...maybe I dreamt it????

  8. #33
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    I WOULD NOT RECOMEND THE USE OF THIS PRODUCT!!!!!!!!!! THERE WAS A POST EITHER HERE OR ON ONE OF MY JANOME YAHOO GROUPS....IT MAY NOT GUNK UP YOUR NEEDLE, HOWEVER, WHEN THE MACHINE REPAIR MAN OPENED UP A JANOME MACHINE WHERE THIS WAS USED, THERE WERE THOUSANDS OF TINY ROUND PIECES OF THE PLASTIC INSIDE OF THE MACHINE, CAUSED BY THE NEEDLE PUNCHING LITTLE PIECES OF THE PLASTIC OUT AS THE NEEDLE WENT THROUGH IT. I would not recommend this at all. Diana

  9. #34
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    Thanks for sharing all your experiences - sometimes it just doesn't pay to take short cuts - but someone has to try it to see if it works!

  10. #35
    Senior Member Cagey's Avatar
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    I also thought this would be a great way to follow a pattern so I tried it on a lap size quilt. I think it worked OK except the sheets of GLAD kept sticking together and made it a little cumbersome. I was happy with the results until I started peeling off the GLAD. Use lots of patience, good light, and a tweezers to get the plastic wrap off. There were some spots that loosened/ripped the thread but not too bad. It is a good way to follow a complicated pattern.

  11. #36
    Super Member marla's Avatar
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    I'd fear the glue gumming up the machine needle and what type of ink would you use on the press n seal? I would not want to use a marker as it could get into your fabric.
    Jesus knows all my imperfections yet he still loves me. Amazing!

  12. #37
    Junior Member SewOK's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried the water soluble stabilizer that you use for machine embroidery. You wouldn't be able to use anything wet that would dissolve the stabilizer but you could use a pencil or something on that order and it would just wash away. Also there is a tear away stabilizer that is made for machine embroidery that may work as well.

  13. #38
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    Well, now after reading this discussion, I am almost thoroughly confused about what is the best method for following a pattern while machine quilting... LOL! Actually this has been very informative and gives me lots to think about. Being new to machine quilting, I didn't even know there were so many methods. This board is so helpful for us "novices". I just did a small wall hanging and used stacked white tissue paper and the unthreaded needle method to poke holes. I sprayed a little temporary spray adhesive outside of the stitching area to hold it in place. I saw this on one of the tv quilting shows. I think they used the Golden Threads paper but I didn't want to wait.

  14. #39
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Please be very careful with the Mr Clean Magic erasers. They're actually abrasive, it's how they "magically" remove things. I learned the hard way with the Teak table we got from DH's parents. There were sharpie marks on it from the kids, so I thought, hey these new Magic Erasers seem like just the thing....

    It took the sharpie marks off, along with part of the finish. I had to re-oil the table and it still didn't ever quite match. Luckily, I'm the only one who knew where the marks were.

    If you use one on a shiny surface, and look carefully, you can see the scratches it leaves, making the surface dull where you use it. They're great for some things, but I wouldn't use them on a sewing machine bed myself

    Other than really porous surfaces, I usually use a dry erase marker to remove permanent marker. The solvent in the pen dissolves the "permanent" marker as well, then you wipe it off. I do this on all of my rulers when I use permanent marker and get some on it. I've done it to the tops of laptops, dry erase boards, desk tops, all sorts of things. It's worked on almost everything. The surfaces where it's "pitted" (like the finish on a early 90s Pfaff for instance) it doesn't work as well on, but with more elbow grease you can get even most of that out.

  15. #40
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by judykay View Post
    I am a hand quilter and just finished a wedding quilt and wanted a huge heart and feathers in the center as my design. I found the pattern I wanted and took it to a local blue print copy place and had them enlarge it. I then traced my design onto washable interfacing , I used a little bit of glue stick to hold it in place. When I was finished with my quilting I just put it in the washer and everything washed out beautiful. I was a little leary of putting all the interfacing thru the washer so I cut out some of the larger pieces first. It washes up beautiful and you can also find the kind that is tear out if you are more comfortable with that. There are two different kinds, one is sort of plastic feeling on top similar to the press and seal and some are more woven which is what I used.

    This post should have said WATER SOLUBLE & not WASHABLE. When finished I cut away part of the larger pieces and put the quilt in the washer and it is completely gone. You can use any kind of your favorite marking pens or pencils and trace the design then put a little glue stick in a few places and lay it on the quilt top. This method was done with hand quilting and is the same interfacing used for machine embroidery but I purchased it by the yardage. Be careful if you do purchase this as there are two kinds and one is plastic feeling like the glad wrap that was mentioned and is a little more difficult to stitch thru.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  16. #41
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    I am so glad I can learn from other people's experiences! Thank you all for your help!

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    Please be very careful with the Mr Clean Magic erasers. They're actually abrasive, it's how they "magically" remove things. I learned the hard way with the Teak table we got from DH's parents. There were sharpie marks on it from the kids, so I thought, hey these new Magic Erasers seem like just the thing....

    It took the sharpie marks off, along with part of the finish. I had to re-oil the table and it still didn't ever quite match. Luckily, I'm the only one who knew where the marks were.

    If you use one on a shiny surface, and look carefully, you can see the scratches it leaves, making the surface dull where you use it. They're great for some things, but I wouldn't use them on a sewing machine bed myself

    Other than really porous surfaces, I usually use a dry erase marker to remove permanent marker. The solvent in the pen dissolves the "permanent" marker as well, then you wipe it off. I do this on all of my rulers when I use permanent marker and get some on it. I've done it to the tops of laptops, dry erase boards, desk tops, all sorts of things. It's worked on almost everything. The surfaces where it's "pitted" (like the finish on a early 90s Pfaff for instance) it doesn't work as well on, but with more elbow grease you can get even most of that out.
    What a great tip! Thanks!

  18. #43
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    When I paperpiece, I just spray a little water on the paper side, and it comes off quite easily.
    Make certain not to overspray, or it will get soggy, and thus a mess.
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

  19. #44
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
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    Wax paper is my choice of material. I run the paper thru my domestic machine without thread tracing the inked pattern on regular paper. Then I use the wax paper on my longarm and follow the dots. Tears beautifully.

    MaryKatherine
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  20. #45
    Senior Member MissBarbQuilts's Avatar
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    I would never know about topics like this if not for the Quilting Board!

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    Please be very careful with the Mr Clean Magic erasers. They're actually abrasive, it's how they "magically" remove things. I learned the hard way with the Teak table we got from DH's parents.
    Right. I've never used them on a porous surface such as wood...but I have one of those 'textured' refrigerator doors that simply won't come clean, and the MCME does the trick (along with a bunch of other stuff that not even a scrubbie pad will work on). I'm sorry your table was ruined

  22. #47
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    Back to the topic...I think I'll try the 'perforation' method with tissue paper or even the used dryer sheets. I was reading a post on a blog yesterday and was glad to see that I wasn't the only one who is hesitant to mark on the right side of fabric

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by woody View Post
    I found the glad press and seal a real pain to get out from under my stitches. (I used some to when I did some hand quilting, so my stitches weren't exactly tiny) also I used a red sharpie to mark my quilting lines and my thread actually took on some of the colour so now it is pink
    As for paper piecing use the cheapest paper you can find and use a slightly smaller stitch than normal, and tear carefully, it should all come out. If there are tiny pieces left they would wash out when you first wash the quilt.
    Also you can spritz it a bit with water if its giving you a tough time. A pattern I bought used very very heavy paper (Bella Bella) and spritzing worked great.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    If it makes you feel better, I used a red sharpie to mark lines on interfacing, and after sewing them all, I now have a nice red line across the bed of my sewing machine
    I thought Sharpies were permenant! I used kids washable markers without a problem. Always test any marker on your fabric before marking your acual quilt. I also love the Frxion (sp) pens.

  25. #50
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    I then traced my design onto washable interfacing , I used a little bit of glue stick to hold it in place. When I was finished with my quilting I just put it in the washer and everything washed out beautiful.

    You mean "Wash away" ot "Washable" right?

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