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Thread: Hand piecing vs. Machine Piecing

  1. #1
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    Hand piecing vs. Machine Piecing

    I am making a Winding Ways quilt. It has curved seams and intersections with multiple seams creating bulk. I have made 3 blocks, one is machine pieced and three are hand pieced. I like that the seams on the hand pieced blocks are stitched from point of seam intersection to point of seam intersection instead of raw edge-to-raw edge. It leaves the seam allowances free, and the multiple seam intersection more flexible, if that makes sense. Is that feature helpful for quilting over seams?

    If there's no huge end benefit to hand piecing, I may go back to stitching on the machine. Even with all the pinning on the curved seams and narrow joining pieces, it is faster than doing it by hand.
    Elizabeth

  2. #2
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I have made several winding ways quilts and have done them all by machine without a problem. They were all die cut, however. Here's one:
    Winding Ways, Healing Ways

    Also, I have the book: "Winding Ways Quilts: A Practically Pinless Approach"
    https://www.amazon.com/Winding-Ways-...s=winding+ways

    she gives tips on pressing that make the block lay flat, and her technique really is almost pinless. You can get a used copy pretty reasonably priced. She also has a lot of interesting setting options. Worthwhile if you are going to make more.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  3. #3
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    The lady who authored the book is in my guild. She is quite a prolific quilter.

    I believe that few patterns lend themselves to hand piecing. This one fits the bill in my opinion. I generally try which method works best for me and then make the decision.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  4. #4
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    I applaud anyone who can hand piece. I know someone who does, and her quilts are beautiful. I would be afraid to try.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    Life is 10 percent what happens to you, and 90 percent what you do about it. - Steve Harvey

  5. #5
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    Your quilt is beautiful, Paper Princess! Thank you for posting a link to the picture. I bought the book you suggested after I ordered my templates and started tracing and cutting out the pieces. I'm just wondering if there's any advantages to hand piecing over machine piecing on blocks with several intersecting seams.

    I think I may go back to machine sewing, so I can use my time for hand quilting it.
    Elizabeth

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizajo View Post
    I am making a Winding Ways quilt. It has curved seams and intersections with multiple seams creating bulk. I have made 3 blocks, one is machine pieced and three are hand pieced. I like that the seams on the hand pieced blocks are stitched from point of seam intersection to point of seam intersection instead of raw edge-to-raw edge. It leaves the seam allowances free, and the multiple seam intersection more flexible, if that makes sense. Is that feature helpful for quilting over seams?

    If there's no huge end benefit to hand piecing, I may go back to stitching on the machine. Even with all the pinning on the curved seams and narrow joining pieces, it is faster than doing it by hand.

    I have machine pieced 3 double wedding rings quilts by machine. The instructions all said to mark a small pencil dot 1/4" from the stitched from point of seam intersection to point of seam intersection and leave the ends free. It works. This may help you to machine piece of your winding ways quilt with similar results of your hand piecing.

  7. #7
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    The bigger template sizes are easier to navigate than the smaller templates. Just a thought.

  8. #8
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    Have you checked out any YouTube tutes on this block.....there may be some "trick" to ease into that bulky seam situation....

  9. #9
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    I've used both hand- and machine-piecing for this block, and both worked OK for me. Of course, machine piecing can be faster, but you need to line up your pieces just so. I love the look of the pattern, but one quilt was enough for me!

  10. #10
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    I tried the curved piecing and was just careful not to stretch or tug but to just hold and guide. Then I sneezed!! Near the end!!

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