Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Handi Quilter Frame

  1. #1
    Member mab112146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Trinity Texas
    Posts
    29
    I just purchased a Handi Quilter quilting frame.... older version will be looking for info from you gals that have experience with this frame. I have quilted on a machine frame at the local quilt shop but I am going to try at home. Any advice?

  2. #2
    Super Member sewmuchmore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    4,000
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wish I could help but I am learn myself. Will be watching to see what others will say. Good Luck!!

  3. #3
    Super Member no1jan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    2,065
    I've heard that once you get used to it they are nice, but I've never tried one.

    Be interesting to hear the responses though.

  4. #4
    Member mab112146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Trinity Texas
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by sewmuchmore
    Wish I could help but I am learn myself. Will be watching to see what others will say. Good Luck!!
    Thanks maybe we can learn together ....someone out there that can give us advice

    :P

  5. #5
    Super Member CoyoteQuilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,306
    I don't have a Handi Quilter frame, but a Super Quilter table top frame. As with most of us that use a domestic sewing machine with these frames, I want 'bigger', but it is a lot nicer to be able to quilt my tops on a frame instead of tugging the quilt around by hand. The only problem I have is the quilting room at the end of the quilt. I try and start with my quilting the same way I will have to end it.

    The hardest part about the table top quilters is to get a sturdy table to put it on and to get it level. My DH bought me a solid core door and we put it on 2 wall cabinets that we bought at a second hand construction store. Spent about 70 dollars for the cabinets and door and my frame cost me 400. Then electrical cord, PVC pipe and switch for 'handles' was about 20. Not a bad deal.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
    Member mab112146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Trinity Texas
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteQuilts
    I don't have a Handi Quilter frame, but a Super Quilter table top frame. As with most of us that use a domestic sewing machine with these frames, I want 'bigger', but it is a lot nicer to be able to quilt my tops on a frame instead of tugging the quilt around by hand. The only problem I have is the quilting room at the end of the quilt. I try and start with my quilting the same way I will have to end it.

    The hardest part about the table top quilters is to get a sturdy table to put it on and to get it level. My DH bought me a solid core door and we put it on 2 wall cabinets that we bought at a second hand construction store. Spent about 70 dollars for the cabinets and door and my frame cost me 400. Then electrical cord, PVC pipe and switch for 'handles' was about 20. Not a bad deal.
    thanks for the pic and info, I had never thought about the leveling. i too was going to use a door on top of a table for stablity, what is the mirror for?

    :-P

  7. #7
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lexington,Kentucky
    Posts
    6,155
    Blog Entries
    6
    How do these things work?

  8. #8
    Senior Member DeneK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Commerce, Ga
    Posts
    710
    Some really nice person recently gave me one of the older HandiQuilter frames. I got it set up (with only a few trials and errors). Found there is definitely a learning curve. I have a Janome 1600P. Having problems with thread breaking, but I remember a conversation about thread brands which I am going to try and find and see if there is a fix there. Then just the FMQ is a skill that takes lots of practice.

    HOWEVER, the feel of the machine and ease of movement is really, really cool.

    Hope this remains an active thread and all us newbies can learn together.

  9. #9
    Member mab112146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Trinity Texas
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by DeneK
    Some really nice person recently gave me one of the older HandiQuilter frames. I got it set up (with only a few trials and errors). Found there is definitely a learning curve. I have a Janome 1600P. Having problems with thread breaking, but I remember a conversation about thread brands which I am going to try and find and see if there is a fix there. Then just the FMQ is a skill that takes lots of practice.

    HOWEVER, the feel of the machine and ease of movement is really, really cool.

    Hope this remains an active thread and all us newbies can learn together.
    Try a 100 Needle. this is a little heavy and should solve breaking thread

  10. #10
    Member DRogers870's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rockville, Maryland
    Posts
    53
    I have a "b-line" (I think thats the name) table top frame and I have it sitting on 2 solid wood kitchen tables - my only problem is how to anchor down the 4th corner that sits in the middle of the table since the two tables are a little bit to long. Thanks for your picture - I never thought to put a mirror underneath laying on the table - great idea ! Thanks. What is everyones system for loading the quilts onto the poles ?

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.