Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: Help and advice needed from anyone who has been there

  1. #31
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason, Ohio
    Posts
    1,134
    I started my grand kids with strip quilts....5" width of fabric. They made them for the Children's Hospital here. They were very proud.

  2. #32
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tucker, GA
    Posts
    2,049
    I taught my 10 year old neighbor to quilt last summer using Disappearing 9 Patch.....you should have seen the look on her face when I took her into my craft room and told her to pick out any 54 fabrics that she loved! I stressed the 1/4" seam and showed her how my machine has moleskin on it to help with that seam. Her quilt turned out really great! (Oh, and I used the rotary cutter for her as she was scared of it and I couldn't find a cut-proof glove small enough for her hand) Enjoy the experience and don't try to accomplish too much at once!
    Mistakes are just opportunities to invent a new quilting technique!

  3. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    192
    I started my granddaughter off making pillowcases. I let her pick from my stash (she always seems to choose my most loved fabrics - but I can't tell her no). She made some for her camp counselors this summer choosing fabrics that reminded her of them - she really was proud of her finished works and loved the praise they gave her. I bought her a very inexpensive Janome - three stitches, low speed - good to start but once she used my Diamond she didn't want to go back.

  4. #34
    Senior Member bobquilt3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    495
    I sewed with both grandkids that live in the area.. . A boy and a girl. To me the most important thing is to keep it fun. Neither one has gone on to be quilters but they are still young. they are able to use a machine and work with fabric and somewhere in their future its there if they want it. They picked out projects and we kept them small and doable. . . Doll quilt, pillow, etc. if nothing else, I hope it left them with a feeling that sewing is a pleasure and it was a happy time spent with Gramma.

  5. #35
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    northern California
    Posts
    1,084
    Nine is a great age to start quilting. The first thing I'd do is ask the mama if she could come to YOU (not necessarily your son's day) more often to work on sewing. Maybe stay for a weekend once a month (although at that age they really like to get things done). Of course you'll spend a lot of time talking/showing about fingers and needles (I'd get her a purple thang if you don't already have one)! Try to let her go through your stash (or the part of your stash you are willing to share) w/o too many suggestions from you. Let her fly on her own; if she decides later that she doesn't like some aspect of "her" quilt, she can do it differently next time.

    Eight to about 12 is a wonderful age to begin learning to sew/guilt. For both boys and girls. They aren't so socially conscious yet and more willing to try things, and yet have a sense of "working". Younger and older are fun also, but by the time they get into their teens time becomes an element.

  6. #36
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    1,173
    I have enjoyed reading this post. I work with the girls in my neighborhood on fair projects and sewing. One tip that I have is to teach hand sewing starting with plastic canvas, yarn, and a blunt needle. It seems natural to us, but they need practice in applying the principle of "what goes up, goes down before it goes up again" and keeping the yarn/thread from getting hung up or tangling.

    I have ordered a "finger guard" for the Featherweight, since machine sewing for the 2 girls who are almost 8 is next on their list. The 10 year old is doing fine. She just finished a 9 patch pillow to give her mother for Christmas, and she is proud of the way it turned out.

    We will be doing tissue covers for their teacher gifts, but I may be turning the handwheel on the machine for the 7 year olds at first. With such short seams, I don't think my arm will get too tired. They will have a project that can be finished quickly.

    I think I mentioned before on the board that we are planning a "Little House on the Prairie" quilt during school vacation. They need practice in cutting, and we will start by cutting apart old plaid cotton shirts. I found a blue chambray curtain at a garage sale that looks like the kind of fabric my dad's shirts were made of, so we will alternate that with the plaids. The whole thing will be a lesson in recycling and teamwork (there are 3 girls). I plan to make an applique out of a Holly Hobbie panel to be put on top of the boring plaids, but they don't know that yet.

  7. #37
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    upstate New York
    Posts
    27
    Blog Entries
    25
    My Granddaughter was 6 and we started with pillow cases for her Aunt who was getting married. She picked the fabric, I cut and then I drew the quarter inch for all the seams for her to follow. Her attention span is also short and she is a perfectionist so got a little frustrated at times. She loves to sew, but not necessarily make anything. She likes to "practice" with all the stitches. I only see her twice a year because she lives too far away, but it is our special thing to do together, so I hope the interest continues. I also slowed down the speed and stressed the safety part of where her fingers and hands had to go

  8. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by shandyr1 View Post
    I have a 9 yoa gd that wants to learn to make a quilt. She has never sewn. I am seeking advise from those of you who have taught a child to sew. Where should I start with her? I only see her one day every other week, when my son has her for the day. Can anyone give me some good ideas? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    The munchkin next door wanted to learn how to sew at age 6. She is a smart little cookie, so I took advantage of her desire (eyes lit up at the thought of using the machine). Rule #1: thou shalt not touch the rotary cutter - it is a dangerous tool (even for some adults!). So, I did the cutting and she did the sewing. Before very many sessions, she was using all of the correct terminology and knew the parts of the machine and what they did. She even had a list of her favorite decorative stitches. Recommendation: use 3M Command strips on the machine bed as a 1/4" guide. Another good practice thing is to use a muslin base and selvedge strips to "build" a square or a rectangle to make a selvedge place mat. She made a set of 4 for her family - all carefully chosen to fit the mother, father, little brother, and herself. She is a whiz at this. Rachel just turned 9 today and so far she has made a reversible tote bag for her mom, a pillow for her brother, the set of place mats, a ruffled reversible baby bib and a child's apron in addition to the sample quilt squares. All of these at her request. Her mother does not sew and finds this amazing. It warms my heart to pick up the phone and hear "Can we sew today, Miss Kay?" Absolutely, Rachel - come on over.

  9. #39
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Just north of Cajun country
    Posts
    1,005
    when my granddaughter's started sewing i set them up a table that was just their size- with chairs that fit them- used a machine i could turn the speed down on-so if they were a little heavy footed it did not get out of control. they laid their fabrics out on the floor the way they wanted them then they sewed them together- they used scissors to cut- i ironed for them- and if they wanted anything cut they had trouble with they brought it to me for using the rotory cutter (no one under 18 gets to use the cutters)
    the youngest was 4 when she made her daddy a special quilt---some of her seams were narrow, some were an inch wide- few were very straight- but she made it her way- loved it- he loved it even more & now 8 years later- it is still one of his all time best/favorite quilts and i'm sure will be so all his life.
    her skills have improved, her interest and ability has grown over the years - as has the other 2 girls also...in our world the fact i give them (fairly free rein) with guidance has sparked their creativity and made them feel if they can ((envision) it they can create it QUOTE
    Ckcowl, what a nice way to teach them.

  10. #40
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    SW Minnesota
    Posts
    1,505
    My 9 yo grandson and 6 yo granddaughter asked me if they could sew with me. Am I ever happy they asked! Unfortunately, I work almost full time yet, and the kiddos live about 2 1/2 hours away, so we don't see them very often. I am hoping for some sewing time with them this spring/summer, even taking vacation time to do so!
    When someone mentions quilting, I go to pieces!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.