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Thread: Help please!

  1. #1
    Luv2Kreate's Avatar
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    I am working on a very large quilt. It is based on the Scruffy Quilt @ Moda Bake Shop http://www.modabakeshop.com/2009/08/...ily-quilt.html Mine is a lot larger than the one in the tutorial @ 86 x 76. What is the best way to quilt these squares? Turning this monster is a pain and there are three squares to quilt for each block. I am exhausted after just 4 blocks. I am having a heck of a time adjusting and turning the quilt. This is the 1st large quilt I have quilted ( I am remembering why my tops are not quilted). I have no problem doing this same thing with the small quilts. PLEASE I need advise on how to make this smoother! Ideas, suggestions, please.....

  2. #2
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    Oh that looks like an easy quilt top to make!

    Sorry I have no ideas on how to quilt it.

  3. #3
    Luv2Kreate's Avatar
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    The top was a blast to make because it was easy! I am sure paying for it now!

  4. #4
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    Well good luck to you!

    Maybe just do horizontal & vertical lines shadowing the seams??

  5. #5
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    There is a way to make quilting a large quilt top much easier. How is your sandwich basted? (Hmmmm....that sounds kind of funny.....) If you've already spray basted, I'm not sure if this would work. However, here's the process.

    Basically you divide the batting into thirds. This greatly reduces the bulk you need to deal with while quilting the middle section.

    Take the quilt and pin one side of the top and backing back, so just the batting is exposed. Use a rotary cutter to cut the batting in a curvy line (about 6" curves) from top to bottom. Mark the top and right side of the batting, or make registration marks so later you can fit those two pieces of batting back together again exactly as they were. Do the same with the other side. Now, when you quilt the middle, there will be much less bulk under the arm of the machine. Roll and pin the top/backing so it is out of your way.

    When you quilt the middle, be sure and leave 2 or 3 inches near the batting unquilted. Attach one side of the batting back to where it was. Some people will machine zigzag the two pieces together at this point, but I think it is better to hand tailor-tack the two pieces of batting together. The reason for cutting the batting with a curvy line is twofold: you can match the pieces back up more accurately, and the cut will not provide a straight-line weak point in your quilt if it is folded.

    When you are done quilting that side of the quilt, attach the other batting and quilt the remaining side.

    With this method the top and backing stay intact and no one ever knows that you quilted the quilt in 3 sections.

  6. #6
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    There is a way to make quilting a large quilt top much easier. How is your sandwich basted? (Hmmmm....that sounds kind of funny.....) If you've already spray basted, I'm not sure if this would work. However, here's the process.

    Basically you divide the batting into thirds. This greatly reduces the bulk you need to deal with while quilting the middle section.

    Take the quilt and pin one side of the top and backing back, so just the batting is exposed. Use a rotary cutter to cut the batting in a curvy line (about 6" curves) from top to bottom. Mark the top and right side of the batting, or make registration marks so later you can fit those two pieces of batting back together again exactly as they were. Do the same with the other side. Now, when you quilt the middle, there will be much less bulk under the arm of the machine. Roll and pin the top/backing so it is out of your way.

    When you quilt the middle, be sure and leave 2 or 3 inches near the batting unquilted. Attach one side of the batting back to where it was. Some people will machine zigzag the two pieces together at this point, but I think it is better to hand tailor-tack the two pieces of batting together. The reason for cutting the batting with a curvy line is twofold: you can match the pieces back up more accurately, and the cut will not provide a straight-line weak point in your quilt if it is folded.

    When you are done quilting that side of the quilt, attach the other batting and quilt the remaining side.

    With this method the top and backing stay intact and no one ever knows that you quilted the quilt in 3 sections.
    Thanks for that!!! I will have to try this!

  7. #7
    Super Member Eddie's Avatar
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    I did a quilt very similar to that and did free-motion quilting on it. Here's a link to a pic of it.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/25754.page

  8. #8
    Luv2Kreate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    There is a way to make quilting a large quilt top much easier. How is your sandwich basted? (Hmmmm....that sounds kind of funny.....) If you've already spray basted, I'm not sure if this would work. However, here's the process.

    Basically you divide the batting into thirds. This greatly reduces the bulk you need to deal with while quilting the middle section.

    Take the quilt and pin one side of the top and backing back, so just the batting is exposed. Use a rotary cutter to cut the batting in a curvy line (about 6" curves) from top to bottom. Mark the top and right side of the batting, or make registration marks so later you can fit those two pieces of batting back together again exactly as they were. Do the same with the other side. Now, when you quilt the middle, there will be much less bulk under the arm of the machine. Roll and pin the top/backing so it is out of your way.

    When you quilt the middle, be sure and leave 2 or 3 inches near the batting unquilted. Attach one side of the batting back to where it was. Some people will machine zigzag the two pieces together at this point, but I think it is better to hand tailor-tack the two pieces of batting together. The reason for cutting the batting with a curvy line is twofold: you can match the pieces back up more accurately, and the cut will not provide a straight-line weak point in your quilt if it is folded.

    When you are done quilting that side of the quilt, attach the other batting and quilt the remaining side.

    With this method the top and backing stay intact and no one ever knows that you quilted the quilt in 3 sections.
    I already have it pinned and started quilting it. I will keep this in mind next time!

  9. #9
    Luv2Kreate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie
    I did a quilt very similar to that and did free-motion quilting on it. Here's a link to a pic of it.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/25754.page
    WOW your quilt is fabulous. I already started quilting the squares like the original one in the tutorial...I probably should have just free motion quilted it or grid quilted it. I will know next time...or make a smaller one!

  10. #10
    Super Member Grandma Cindy's Avatar
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    you can do it, we know you can.......

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