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Thread: Hooping for Embroidering after Sandwiching all 3 layers

  1. #1
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    I could use any hints that anyone has on how to hoop all three layers of the quilt for doing embroidery on. It really is thick and hard to keep in the hoop, but I want to do some embroidery designs in some of the blocks. But I am not quite sure how to go about it. Any hints would be appreciated. Thank you.

  2. #2
    racnquilter's Avatar
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    I think you should probably embroider the block before sandwiching.

  3. #3
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    use a sticky stabilizer and only hoop the stabilizer, then place the quilt on top, it's gonna be tricky and I wouldn't walk away, stay close in case the weight tries to shift

  4. #4
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    When I do them I have to loosen the screw as much as it will go and hoop. I use low loft batting when I am embroidering through all 3 layers.

  5. #5
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    I agree with racnquilter - embroider blocks first.

  6. #6
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    when hooping the entire three layers you should consider how it will look on the reverse side. Most embroidery designs don't look good on the back and need another layer to cover up all the bunches of thread. Embroidery before hooping is usually more successful and then machine quilt around the design when layers are together.

  7. #7
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    What batting are you using?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewnsewer2
    What batting are you using?
    Low loft polyester

  9. #9
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    Depends on the design you use do a sample first. Here is a baby quilt I did, It shows the front and back.

    Front and back
    Name:  Attachment-65323.jpe
Views: 17
Size:  48.8 KB

    Front
    Name:  Attachment-65324.jpe
Views: 14
Size:  46.5 KB

  10. #10
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I embroider my quilts all the time. I only use outline stitches on the 3 layer sandwich. If other embroidery designs are used, those with fill stitches they must be embroidered on the top only. Otherwise they'll be ugly on the back. The outline stitches look as good on the top as the bottom-at least they should!

    Here's what I do:

    Hoop the sandwich. Yes, it can be tricky but is worth the time saved quilting it on your own.

    I use NO stablizer as the batting acts as the stabilizer, especially on outline, quilting designs. I only use a thin batting like Warm and Natural or a low loft fusible, batting.

    I stitch out a sample first to test tension of the design. Often times I lower the top tension on my machine. I don't use the pig tail in the bobbin (for Berninas) and set up my machine for normal sewing. This evens out the tension.

    I stitch out the design on my quilt and watch it carefully. I hold the fabric up lightly as the weight of the quilt pulls on the embroidery arm...especially if the quilt is large. I don't create any tension on the quilt I simply keep the quilt lifted up off the arm so it doesn't "pull".

    Hope this helps. I embroider/quilt many of my quilts using my embroidery function. In fact, it's why I bought my machine to begin with. I don't have a long-arm, but this is the closest I can get to perfect feathers etc. I do FMQ a lot on my own, but the embroidery function makes it look so professional and perfect!

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