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Thread: How do you attache quilt to old fashioned quilting frames?

  1. #1
    Senior Member hpylady's Avatar
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    I have a set of old quilting frames that was just given to me by my Aunt's friend. When he purchased his house many years ago (he is fixing to turn 90) the frames were left in the top of the barn. I am working on a quilt ( sailboat block pattern) for my grandson. I would like to handquilt this quilt when I finish on these quilting frames. I just need to know how to attache the quilt to the frames the proper way. Can anyone help me and pictures would really be nice. :?:

  2. #2
    Super Member lfw045's Avatar
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    I know how my MIL used to put hers on a frame....she tacked (small nails)one end of the quilt to the rail. She used to quilt for a West Virginia company.......can't remember thename right off. That is the way she did it, and turned the rail as she went along to advance the quilt.

    There's probably a better way to do it.

  3. #3
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    My mother always used thumb tacks. I've done this too and you need to be sure you don't tear the fabric. I think I should have used more and not tried to pull it so tight.

  4. #4
    Super Member Kyiav10's Avatar
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    I have a new hand quilting frame that was made by the Amish. Tack some muslin on the rails and sides with carpenters staples. Then pin the quilt to the muslin. That was how I was told to do it by the lady who sold it to me. Works for me.

    Kyia

  5. #5
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    I had an antique I used for years. I used a heavy twill tape, basted by machine onto top and bottom of quilt backing, allowing plenty of extra room. The tape was tacked onto the frame. As I set the batting and the top, I would hand baste and roll. It takes time, but any handwork will anyway.
    The second pole would be the receiving end - as you completed a section, it would be rolled down to reveal a new unquilted section.

    Mine had poles with 8 sides, a beautifil huge cherrywood beast. I would need my ex to help when it was time to roll out a new section. The poles were covered in holes from years of quilts tacked on. I hope someone is still using it.

  6. #6
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    It may be helpful to see what your frame is like.

    Mine, I have muslin nailed on the two sides that roll. I have the center point of each rail marked with permanent marker so I can center my quilt into the frame. When I use the frame, I add approximately a yard to the backing, so I have enough. Then, I roll the whole thing on one side, and roll it to the other side as I advance. I don't think it's a good idea to use staples or nails on your backing fabric. Better on fabric that will stay on your frame.


  7. #7
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    I will be hand quilting on a board frame tomorrow and will take some pictures of the quilt we just put in. We use thumbtacks, lots of them.
    First we size the quilt by tacking the top on the four boards. We use "horses" to hold the boards, but many used chairs for the four corners. We have 4 c-clamps to hold the boards stable. The side boards go under and the near and far boards go on top so you can roll as you go.
    After the quilt is sized, take it off the boards. Remember which way it was laying as some quilts are not square and will not go in if they are turned or rotated.
    Attach your backing with the good side down, away from the batting. Use plenty of tacks to get the backing taut so there will be no wrinkles when you quilt.
    Lay your batting on top of the backing, smoothe it out to get rid of any bumps and tack it. You don't have to use as many tacks here, unless it feels like it wants to shift.
    Then place your top back on and tack securely. You can use some of the under tacks here, take them out and repin them on the top layer. :lol:

  8. #8
    Senior Member hpylady's Avatar
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    :) Thank you, I would love to see your quilt on your frames. You explained it very well.

  9. #9
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    Spent several hours yesterday trying to attach a picture and was unsuccessful! Will give it a go again later today! So frustrating when the computer will not do as ORDERED! :(

  10. #10
    Senior Member hpylady's Avatar
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    :) Thank you for trying and good luck with attaching the picture. I know how frustrating it is to get the computer to do what you want it to do. It has a mind of its own. Anxious to see the picture.

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