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Thread: How do you convert an industrial Long Arm to go on frame?

  1. #1
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    Does anyone know how to convert one of those industrial sewing machines to be able to go on a frame?
    I have an opportunity to get one possibly and would love to make it work if at all possible.

    My husband has told me that under no circumstance am I getting a $2000 long arm (yeah, the one I want is more like $4000!) so if I want something long on my frame it's going to have to be something I luck in to for less than $300.....

    So if you know someone that has done this or if you have, please let me know what to do! I really want to make this work! I don't want to have my 6" domestic on my frame for long.... :(

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    This would be an interesting question to ask on the homequiltingsystems group at http://groups.yahoo.com . Someone there may have done it already and be able to help.

  3. #3
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    theoretically, any size machine is usable on a frame. the question is this: where does the needle face? if it faces like a regular machine, then you have to run it in the usual position. you can obviously get a much larger roll of quilted fabric under the arm, but facing that way you can't use it on a frame. to do that, it would have to sit on the side of the frame and....what? it can't reach all the way across. also, industrial or not, you still have to push all that stuff around.

    now, if it faces the same way as a quilter's longarm, then yes. as long as the sled and rails are long enough AND the space between the take-up roller and the front roller are far enough apart to accommodate the base of the machine, then what you actually have is an industrial quilting machine.

    what kind of frame do you mean?

  4. #4
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    the frames will state what size machine they can hold in the carriage. the only problem you might run into is with accessories.

    most accessories are made to fit specific machines (stitch regulator for example) so you might be out of luck with those items.


  5. #5
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    The big thing with those commercial/industrial machines is that the motor is mounted under the machine - like under the table.
    I'll definitely ask over in the yahoogroup and see if anyone has done this. I know that some people have done it. Two machines like that were just recently up on Ebay - I think one is up right now - relisted. It didn't reach the reserve last time....

  6. #6
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    After reading a bit more about the commercial long arms I don't think it is something I want to deal with....
    I'm going to keep looking and not rush. It's all good :)

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