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Thread: Huck Toweling

  1. #1
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    I was searching through Joanns online sales and came across Huck Toweling. I've never heard of it. Does anybody know what it is?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    Ok, this is going to age me. . . . :roll: Do you remember those towel holders in the public restrooms that were on a roller, but real cloth? That was Huck Toweling. Please also use Huck toweling for embroidery work, my aunt used to pull the cross wise threads and create a fringe on them.

  3. #3
    Super Member Momma_K's Avatar
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    I Googled and found this.... I'll try to get a picture for you in a few...

    Huck Toweling, an old-school Nordic weaving or embroidery technique that gained popularity in the 1940s, is making a comeback among young crafters.

    Huck Toweling can refer to the fabric used for the craft, most often Monk's Cloth today, or the actual embroidery technique which is also sometimes called Huck Embroidery. The technique, traditionally used to embellish hand towels, curtains and other household fabrics, is a surface embroidery technique that requires "floating" floss. "Floating" yarn or floss means that the fibers are woven under the top layers of the fabric but don't penetrate the back or "wrong" side of the fabric.

    Though this sounds like painstaking handwork, many advocates find the precision and detail of the small stitches something that relaxes them and allows them to lose themselves into the craft. Once you get into the rhythm of the stitching, projects can be completed quickly since the floss isn't going through the fabric completely.

    Here is a how-to on the craft from eHow and a simple free pattern from Avery Hill that would look great on the edge of a towel for your first project.

  4. #4
    Super Member Momma_K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian
    I was searching through Joanns online sales and came across Huck Toweling. I've never heard of it. Does anybody know what it is?

    Thanks
    This goes with the same instructions I sent a minute ago...
    Name:  Attachment-135656.jpe
Views: 676
Size:  28.5 KB

  5. #5
    Super Member mrspete's Avatar
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    I wonder if it is akin to waffle pique? I'm still looking for some of that. I use to make decorated towels and aprons to match for Christmas Gifts about two and half light years ago. Now who is telling age??

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    This is going to age me as well, but we embroidered huck towels in jr. high home economics class. I really enjoyed doing that.

    Midwestqltr

  7. #7
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Momma_K
    Quote Originally Posted by MommaDorian
    I was searching through Joanns online sales and came across Huck Toweling. I've never heard of it. Does anybody know what it is?

    Thanks
    This goes with the same instructions I sent a minute ago...
    Wow, that is really beautiful!!

  8. #8

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    My cousin taught me that years ago, she has passed but I have two of her hock towels hanging in my sewing room it's really fun and easy like crossstitch everytime I see those books I would like to do one.

  9. #9
    Super Member dellareya's Avatar
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    How strange to read this post today. Last week I was at a local Craft sale. One vendor had some Huck towels for sale.
    It is also known as Swedish Weaving. I did this craft years ago and still have some of the books on it. I commented on how beautiful the towels were and called them by Huck Toweling. The lady said that in the last 1 year I was the second person to know what it was. She handed me a towel and said it was my prize. Of course I had to buy a couple more from her. I'm sending one to my daughter for Christmas. The fabric is still available on line.

  10. #10
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    I learned to do "Swedish Weaving" in Az a couple of years ago. It is a lot of fun but very time consuming. This technique was done on Monks Cloth and the weaving was done with varigated yarn. The needle used is a flat needle. It is a lot like needlepoint counting threads.

    Overall view.
    Name:  Attachment-135759.jpe
Views: 1847
Size:  70.1 KB

    Close up of weaving
    Name:  Attachment-135760.jpe
Views: 773
Size:  84.2 KB

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