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Thread: I need help in making a neat border on a hexagon table topper.

  1. #1
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    I need help in making a neat border on a hexagon table topper.

    Square mitered corners are easy for me now but any other angle is troublesome! Would a bias strip be better than a
    straight of the grain strip?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Aubrey'sQuiltingCreations's Avatar
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    I like to use bias strip for some of those different angles and dont have much problem at all. For me its all about finding my grove when doing corners. If not do you have a few extra you could try out different techniques first??

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    see if this works not sure how to post a pic in a message

    And here is a tute I fogot I had

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vci9-li3aYU
    Last edited by Riversong; 11-04-2011 at 10:09 PM. Reason: more info

  4. #4
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    My first thought would be to use a contrasting solid fabric for a backing and applique the hexagon edge onto it. To get the full benefit of the right side of the fabric, one would have to make the backing large enough to fold so the right side shows and will be under the hexagons.
    I was asked to finish off a hexagon quilt top this way years ago, at that time, I used a strip of fabric and then sewed the top and backing, right sides together and turned the quilt right side out. I sewed around the outside to secure the backing and top together.

    Carol J.
    We are all sisters tied together by threads.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riversong View Post
    This is pretty much how I do mine. River song, just wondering, when you get to the end before you turn, it looks like you sew off to the corner, is that what you do? If so why?

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    Im not sure what you mean...if I am binding I finish like regular binding on a quilt

  7. #7
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    are you talking about borders or binding they are different things
    Nancy

  8. #8
    Junior Member agoldencomet's Avatar
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    Adding a border to a hexagon quilt is not difficult. First add the border to three alternate sides (that is, skipping every other one). Then do the remaining three sides. This "second step border" will extend across a border, the quilt, and another border. The first three borders will be the length of one side of the hexagon, while the second set of three borders will need to be longer (depending on the width of your border). In a way this is similar to doing log cabin. You can also do a mitered border which is a little more tricky.

  9. #9
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    Great information here. Thanks Riversong.

  10. #10
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agoldencomet View Post
    Adding a border to a hexagon quilt is not difficult. First add the border to three alternate sides (that is, skipping every other one). Then do the remaining three sides. This "second step border" will extend across a border, the quilt, and another border. The first three borders will be the length of one side of the hexagon, while the second set of three borders will need to be longer (depending on the width of your border). In a way this is similar to doing log cabin. You can also do a mitered border which is a little more tricky.
    This is exactly what I've been trying to figure out with my hexagon -- thanks!

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