Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: I need some advice on using Fleece.

  1. #1
    Super Member Bill'sBonBon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    LAKELAND,GEORGIA
    Posts
    1,059
    I bought some beautiful fleece at a yard sale last weekend. For $1.00,I got a large amount of fleece and the simplicty pattern for the poncho. She had already cut the poncho out and sewn it. The problem is she sewed it like you do regular material and had over 1 inch of seam allowance. Didn't know this until and hour ago when I decided to finish the poncho. The seam was very bulky,I read the pattern info. Thank God she had not used a tiny zigzag which the pattern info. recommends. I was able to pull it all out without any problem. The pattern info. recommends overlapping fleece which I am going to do. NOOOW here is the question...I have never used material glue like liquid stitch. The pattern info also said you could use material glue instead of stitching. I bought a tube of Liquid Stitch now will that do the job or is there some other special glue to use with fleece?
    After I glue it can I sew it without any problem if I want to?? Being this is going to my Girly Girl GrtGrndDaughter Keyli' for Christmas I want it to look as perfect as I can get it. I can see her in this it will set her hair and eyes off. She will be 5 in DEC. I took 2 pictures so you can see. The poncho has a hood. The pattern also has the scotty dog pocket book. I have to find some black fleece or dye some white that I have for that.
    Thanks Bunches ahead of time,I know I will get some good input from this board as always when I need the help.

    BillsBonBon

    I overlaped the seams and I think that looks so much neater.
    Name:  Attachment-52222.jpe
Views: 146
Size:  51.7 KB

    See how bulky the seam allowance is?
    Name:  Attachment-52258.jpe
Views: 143
Size:  50.6 KB

  2. #2
    Super Member crkathleen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,199
    Sorry I'm not able to help you but wanted to say great find!

  3. #3
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,006
    Blog Entries
    1
    That's really cute!!!

    I would be worried if the original owner did not prewash and dry the flannel. Flannel can shrink *ton*! You might want to measure a test piece of the extra fabric, wash it, measure it again, then dry it and measure again. That way you can give your giftee's mother has good information about how to wash the poncho without ruining it.

    I am definitely not an expert on liquid stitch, but here goes anyway. I would sew the seam first and then use the liquid stitch to hold the edges down. Liquid stitch is usually used for quick hemming, or to secure an applique patch to fabric; not sure I would trust it for a seam. Flannel normally requires at least a 1/2-inch seam to prevent fraying; I wouldn't go any narrower than that, and I think overlapping an inch would be better.

  4. #4
    Super Member Bill'sBonBon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    LAKELAND,GEORGIA
    Posts
    1,059
    [quote=Prism99]That's really cute!!!

    I would be worried if the original owner did not prewash and dry the flannel. Flannel can shrink *ton*! You might want to measure a test piece of the extra fabric, wash it, measure it again, then dry it and measure again. That way you can give your giftee's mother has good information about how to wash the poncho without ruining it.

    I am definitely not an expert on liquid stitch, but here goes anyway. I would sew the seam first and then use the liquid stitch to hold the edges down. Liquid stitch is usually used for quick hemming, or to secure an applique patch to fabric; not sure I would trust it for a seam. Flannel normally requires at least a 1/2-inch seam to prevent fraying; I wouldn't go any narrower than that, and I think overlapping an inch would be better.[/quote\



    Hi Prism 99,
    Thanks for the help but the it is FLEECE not FLANNEL and this FLEECE is pretty heavy not thin at all. Again thanks for th input.
    BillsBonBon

  5. #5
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,006
    Blog Entries
    1
    Oh, duh! Haven't had enough coffee today, I guess. I've worked with fleece but never used liquid stitch on it. I still wouldn't trust it for a seam without making a test seam to see how it would hold up to stress. It would probably work well to hold down the seam edges after sewing, though. I have always used a small zigzag to sew seams in fleece. This is because fleece is stretchy and the small zigzag will stretch with the fabric; a straight stitch will be more likely to break if the fleece is stretched (say, by a little girl sitting down on it).

    I should add that, for this particular application, I'd probably be inclined to overlap and do a fairly wide and long zigzag stitch on each side. You could try it out on a test strip to make sure it would look okay.

    HTH more than my previous comments! :P

  6. #6
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,671
    Blog Entries
    2
    Do you a serger you can use? That is the best way to sew fleece seams.

  7. #7
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    15,890
    Fleece does not fray. You could just trim the excess if the seams are correct or.... what I often do is fold back the seam and stitch it down. Fleece is a very forgiving fabric, I love useing it! You could also pink it.

  8. #8
    Super Member Bill'sBonBon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    LAKELAND,GEORGIA
    Posts
    1,059
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Do you a serger you can use? That is the best way to sew fleece seams.
    No BellaBoo I don't have a serger. Would like one though. maybe one day.
    BillsBonBon

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    7,739
    When I sew clothing with fleece, I either hand baste all seams or pin every couple of inches, then I machine baste and finally the finishing stitch. It might be overkill, but I usually don't have a problem with things not matching. Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    on the Texas Coast
    Posts
    3,648
    once that glue dries I don't think you'll be able to stitch over it, it gets pretty hard.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.