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Thread: If you need a quarter-yard... exactly a quarter-yard...

  1. #61
    Power Poster
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    I think it depends on the clerk - there were a couple of associates that were so stingy that if I saw they were cutting, I'd leave the store and not buy anything.

    I've actually (hold your breath here) had a manager at WalMart give me a few inches extra.

    And others that cut it to the nearest thread - on their side of the mark!

    I've also had clerks try to stretch the fabric before cutting it.

    I forgot to add to my washing post earlier - the fabric may have been cut "straight" - perpendicular to the fold and selvage - but after washing the ends may or may not be even if one folds the fabric selvage to selvage.

    So many of the directions say "fold your fabric in half - -- " It's important that the fabric is not wrinkled at the fold line - forget about lining up the cut ends -when the fabric is folded, it should lay smoothly and have no wrinkles - this is where "straightening/truing the ends comes in.



  2. #62
    quiltluvr's Avatar
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    Many of my experiences with Jo-Ann's haven't been pleasant. Out of dire necessity I return, much to my chagrin.

    I am always astounded at their cutting. What's worse is that this stores table has the groove and they still can't cut it straight!

    When and wherever I buy fabric I add on extra to cover it not being straight, shrinkage and all as I prewash everything.

    I join the club when it comes to cutting and I don't overly stress about it.

  3. #63
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Re: bearisgray


    yes. to be truly true, the threads in fabric should be at right angles, even after washing. if they're not, and you fold with no drapes at the foldline, you can lose a lot at both ends. the longer the piece, the more you lose. if you needed 18"and got 16" , you're 2" short of what you need. i buy extra and after washing, i cut it the way it wants to go, 'cause it won't go where it doesn't want to. if that means off true, then so be it. in the 50's when i started sewing, you could pull one thread across the width of the fabric and boy! it was straight across. i haven't seen that in ages.

    that's why i don't let clerks rip my fabric. when the grain is off true, the rip follows the grainline and is also off true, so even before washing you lose inches at both ends. after washing, mama mia! conversely, the lengthwise grain is almost always true.

    btw, that's why so many stores prefer to cut. they don't want you to see how off true the fabrics really are. for instance, at my joann's, they refuse to rip. flat out refuse. even the kona. they're not taking chances.

  4. #64
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    I have bought few patterns, so I'm not familiar with how the various designers are about their fabric requirements.

    I believe some have generous requirements, and some are down to the nearest quarter-inch.

    Anyone know how to tell which kind of designer made the pattern one is interested in?

  5. #65
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    I usually make my first cut on the lengthwise grain - that way it improves my chances of having it "on grain" in at least one direction.

  6. #66
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    a number of members have said that they were not given enough in kits,
    but, i, too, wonder about requirements when you are providing your own materials. i almost always buy more than enough, but when i've decided at the end to change a border, for example, i sometimes run out. then i become creative. i think you have to plan for the worst and add the extra to your stash.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    Re: bearisgray


    yes. to be truly true, the threads in fabric should be at right angles, even after washing. if they're not, and you fold with no drapes at the foldline, you can lose a lot at both ends. the longer the piece, the more you lose. if you needed 18"and got 16" , you're 2" short of what you need. i buy extra and after washing, i cut it the way it wants to go, 'cause it won't go where it doesn't want to. if that means off true, then so be it. in the 50's when i started sewing, you could pull one thread across the width of the fabric and boy! it was straight across. i haven't seen that in ages.

    that's why i don't let clerks rip my fabric. when the grain is off true, the rip follows the grainline and is also off true, so even before washing you lose inches at both ends. after washing, mama mia! conversely, the lengthwise grain is almost always true.

    btw, that's why so many stores prefer to cut. they don't want you to see how off true the fabrics really are. for instance, at my joann's, they refuse to rip. flat out refuse. even the kona. they're not taking chances.
    As I said, this is why I want it ripped. If it is not straight and can not be made straight, I won't use it in anything but crafty stuff - tablerunners, some wall quilts, pillows, etc.

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