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Thread: I'm learning a lesson, but what is it?

  1. #21

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    I don't know if this will help or not, I always start stitching my borders in the middle & work to the edge, turn it and then middle to the other edge. I don't do it the way I was taught, didn't make sense to me. try it. and maybe press & trim your border since the stretch out. good luck.

  2. #22
    Super Member Melinda in Tulsa's Avatar
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    To Lynda in TN, I sent you a private message.

    Melinda in Tulsa

  3. #23
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    For miters, go ahead and cut your borders longer, but measure the length you need, mark the middle of the border, take 1/2 the measurement to one side of the middle to the end of your side, take 1/2 to the other side. You'll still be able to miter the corners, but you'll avoid the wave.

    HTH :wink:

  4. #24
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Shelley thanks. I can't believe you have to deal with waves such as the one you showed here. I've never had that happen before. Knowing me, I'd have been tempted to take it apart and fix it for the quilter..although I know you can't do that :cry: You are so good though, I bet when you finish with it...no one can even tell about the wave.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    Sandpat,

    That quilt had three borders, each applied separately. The problem compounded with the addition of each border.

    Had there not been applique on it, I probably would have fixed it. It would have taken less time, and less angst. On that quilt, I took about 8 tucks. She was going to blind stitch them closed (I had basted them so my machine wouldn't end up entangled in the tucks). It was one of her first quilts, and all in all, I was happy with it and she was thrilled.

    Many years ago, I worked in a coat factory. No pins allowed. To set sleeves, we'd start the stitch with the sleeve piece on the bottom. We'd lift the foot slightly, and use the feed dogs to distribute the excess, aiming to match marks at the quarter, half and three-quarter. Sometimes, you want that excess in there. Just not on quilts!!!!

  6. #26
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Since I don't know how to sew...I've never learned to deal with that type of problem. I guess I had better just stick to making sure I do mine right...I'm not too good at fixing the problems, I just have to do it right the first time :wink:

  7. #27
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Hi,

    A few tips I learned from a couple of girls who sew custom drapes and slipcovers. Always use straight of grain/ the selvage length for borders even if you have to piece it. Measure across the middle and use that length even if it is too long or to short. Which ever side is fuller, border or top put on the bottom when sewing and let the feed dogs ease it in for you. It is kind of like setting in a sleeve if you have ever done that. The feed dogs will ease in an amazing amount of fabric.

    Good luck. We all have made tops that ripple. I know measuring is a pain but it is easier than ripping and tearing our hair out.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluebird
    If you cut your border pieces on the length of the fabric (along selvage side) it doesn't stretch.
    This is what I do. I cut all my borders on the straight-of-grain (along the salvage), sew the borders together, sew them to the quilt, miter the corners.

    There are times when I middle border was pieced, I still followed the above for the inner border(s), then followed with the outer border(s).

    But I love long straight borders and mitered corners. That's just me.

  9. #29
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I really think that was my problem with this particular fabric. I should have cut it along the selvage...live and learn...right?? :wink:

  10. #30
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    Mine do this if I stretch the edges of the quilt and pull those seams just ever so slightly apart. Let the edge of the quilt relax, then lay the border (nice and flat) on top.

    If the outside edge of your pieced center is a little ruffly, it's magnified in the borders. So lay the quilt down, lay the border on top, put a little stretch in the border when pinning, and feed through the sewing machine with the border on top. The feed dogs will help.

    Good luck.

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