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Thread: I'm nervous about washing this deep red fabric again--now it's a quilt back.

  1. #1
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    It bled more than any fabric I've ever washed. I washed it twice and added three rinses and there was still a hint of tinge to the water. (I agitate by hand but use the machine.) I added white vinegar to two of the rinses and dried the fabric in the dryer.

    Now the deep red fabric is a quilt back--and there's a bright yellow binding... and lots of white with blacks in the top... and I need to wash it before giving it as a gift (basting spray used).

    So... do you think if I add some vinegar to the wash water, and use two color wash sheets, it'll be fine? Did drying it set the color more?

    I have time to read replies because I need to sew the binding on by hand...

  2. #2
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    Do you have any scraps of it and the other fabrics left?

    If yes, put them all together in a jar - add some detergent and water to it - shake and let set for awhile -

    Come back in an hour or so - and see what happens.

    Some fabrics seem to be resistant to picking up stray dye molecules. Others seem to be magnets.

    If the colors seem okay after setting for a while, you are good to go.

    If not okay - do what the experts suggest.

    As far as that goes - if you did not wash the black and whites or other fabrics - some of them may also have issues.

    I think it's Synthrapol that's suggested to pick up stray dye.

  3. #3
    Junior Member wyoming_quilter's Avatar
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    Can you use one of those color catchers when you wash it? I hear they really work well.

  4. #4
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    I wash all fabric before using it... so I'm safe there. The color wash sheets work great--but it was all red and it was still in the water after five cycles...

    I'll try the detergent trick. :-D

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Use a color catcher sheet. They work real well.

  6. #6
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    I'll probably use two color catcher sheets!! :wink

    Four fabrics for the quilt are soaking in detergent now... the red, the yellow, a white, and a green.... and the clock ticks. I get dishes done while I wait...

  7. #7
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    vinegar is not doing anything to remedy your problem- vinegar only sets acid dyes- which are not used on cottons---so no point in wasting more vinegar.
    synthropol in the water will keep dye in the water from getting on other fabrics-
    color catchers also help collect the dye in the water
    it is important to remove it right away- don't let it sit wet touching itself-
    you can usually find synthropol in quilt shops or stores such as joannes- or hobby lobby.

  8. #8
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I agree with washing it with Synthrapol and lots of color catchers. This combo should catch any remaining loose dye particles so they can't settle into other fabrics.

    Next time wash a bleeder fabric like that in Retayne! Retayne permanently sets color. A few fabrics need 2 washings in Retayne. You never want to use Retayne on a finished quilt such as yours, though, as it will permanently set any unwanted bleeds into other fabrics. At this point your best choice is Synthrapol and *lots* of color catchers (I'd probably use an entire box!).

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    I agree with washing it with Synthrapol and lots of color catchers. This combo should catch any remaining loose dye particles so they can't settle into other fabrics.

    Next time wash a bleeder fabric like that in Retayne! Retayne permanently sets color. A few fabrics need 2 washings in Retayne. You never want to use Retayne on a finished quilt such as yours, though, as it will permanently set any unwanted bleeds into other fabrics. At this point your best choice is Synthrapol and *lots* of color catchers (I'd probably use an entire box!).
    I agree Sythropol is the way to go ! Once a quilt is finished Retayne should not be used. They are two very different products .
    Vinegar is not effective on cotton fabrics, the only benifit is the actual prewashing , you would have the same results if you had not added vinegar.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    vinegar is not doing anything to remedy your problem- vinegar only sets acid dyes- which are not used on cottons---so no point in wasting more vinegar.
    synthropol in the water will keep dye in the water from getting on other fabrics-
    color catchers also help collect the dye in the water
    it is important to remove it right away- don't let it sit wet touching itself-
    you can usually find synthropol in quilt shops or stores such as joannes- or hobby lobby.
    I've never heard of the stuff. Thanks! Hope Jo-Ann's has it!

    Thanks for the info on the other products, too!

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