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Thread: Lovely new collection of reproduction fabrics

  1. #1
    Super Member StitchinJoy's Avatar
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    Moda came out with a collection by Barbara Brackman called "Lately Arrived From London." Thyey are early 19th century reproduction fabrics, and oh so lovely.

    Here's a document with all of the line:
    http://www.unitednotions.com/fcc_lat...rom_london.pdf

    Here is the line on sale at Hancock's of Paducah:
    http://www.hancocks-paducah.com/Item...rackman--m-200

    And here is a closeup of one that I know I will be buying:
    http://www.hancocks-paducah.com/Imag...=M%208196%2013

    No affiliation, just a diehard 19th century lover born a century too late. =sigh=

  2. #2
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    Those are beautiful, thank you for sharing!!! I too was born in the wrong century......"sigh" If only we could choose what era we wanted to live in life would be grand!!!!

    Lisa

  3. #3
    Super Member oksewglad's Avatar
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    While waiting to download--Having lived the life of a farmer/farm wife, I don't want to live in the 19th century. I grew up using an outdoor privy and bathed in an old metal tub as a child. No thank you! I thank the good Lord for running water and an automatic washing machine! My life now is dominated by dirt, I can't imagine trying to keep ahead of it without modern conveniences. Oh and central heating...I won't go any further.
    I would have to be one of the "upper class" so I could have servants to do all the hard work! Sorry for being such a realist! :roll: But I love to read about life in that time frame!

    PS thanks for the link--Barbara Brackman is a treasure. Her historical detail is so well thought out. I don't know if she is a quilter/historian or an historian/quiter.

  4. #4
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    Thanks

  5. #5
    Junior Member Quiltinvaca's Avatar
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    The entire line is absolutely beautiful! The larger florals remind me of Waverly fabrics/wallpaper.

  6. #6
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    Absolutely stunning...off to order!

  7. #7
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oksewglad
    While waiting to download--Having lived the life of a farmer/farm wife, I don't want to live in the 19th century. I grew up using an outdoor privy and bathed in an old metal tub as a child. No thank you! I thank the good Lord for running water and an automatic washing machine! My life now is dominated by dirt, I can't imagine trying to keep ahead of it without modern conveniences. Oh and central heating...I won't go any further.
    I would have to be one of the "upper class" so I could have servants to do all the hard work! Sorry for being such a realist! :roll: But I love to read about life in that time frame!
    Know what you are saying. Love the fabrics and art from back then but sure would not want to live back thrn.
    PS thanks for the link--Barbara Brackman is a treasure. Her historical detail is so well thought out. I don't know if she is a quilter/historian or an historian/quiter.

  8. #8
    Super Member oksewglad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crafty pat
    Know what you are saying. Love the fabrics and art from back then but sure would not want to live back thrn.
    :-)

  9. #9
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oksewglad
    While waiting to download--Having lived the life of a farmer/farm wife, I don't want to live in the 19th century. I grew up using an outdoor privy and bathed in an old metal tub as a child. No thank you! I thank the good Lord for running water and an automatic washing machine! My life now is dominated by dirt, I can't imagine trying to keep ahead of it without modern conveniences. Oh and central heating...I won't go any further.
    I would have to be one of the "upper class" so I could have servants to do all the hard work! Sorry for being such a realist! :roll: But I love to read about life in that time frame!

    PS thanks for the link--Barbara Brackman is a treasure. Her historical detail is so well thought out. I don't know if she is a quilter/historian or an historian/quiter.
    I just have to comment on this- it's so funny!!! I didn't grow up like you but I've always wished I could have servants to do all my work so I could just play! LOL
    Love Barbara Brackman- have all her books. This fabric is wonderful!! :D
    Sue

  10. #10
    Super Member StitchinJoy's Avatar
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    [quote=oksewglad]While waiting to download--Having lived the life of a farmer/farm wife, I don't want to live in the 19th century. I grew up using an outdoor privy and bathed in an old metal tub as a child. No thank you! I thank the good Lord for running water and an automatic washing machine! My life now is dominated by dirt, I can't imagine trying to keep ahead of it without modern conveniences. Oh and central heating...I won't go any further....quote]

    I was a living historian for many years. I portrayed women from 1765-1865 at different events, many in the field at Civil War reenactments.

    I have to say that the challenges were many and I learned so much "walking in their shoes." Having to start a fire and draw water and crush coffee beans before getting my coffee each morning-- sheer torture. Gathering firewood and carrying water while wearing a corset--necessary. My back could never have survived all the work without the spine straightening corset. Taming long wide skirts in a wind while tending a fire--terrifying.

    Their lives were difficult. Coming home, my first act was always to jump in the shower and bless the soul of the guy who figured out how to make hot water come out of the wall!

    But there is also a natural rhythm to the day and a quiet beauty that I sense is fleeting in modern society. There's not so much noise and "filler" in the day.

    In the 19th century, the day is filled with small tasks and you get to see your work-- shirts made, dresses ironed, bread baked-- check check check. I think it's why I love making quilts. The process is such fun, but having something to show for my effort is great too.

    I agree it is a nice place to visit. I also like my modern conveniences--treadles are ok but I really like a sewing machine with a light!

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