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Thread: Making a quilt with satin.. lol.HELP

  1. #1
    mrsalshhadeh's Avatar
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    I am making a quilt out of satin, and I was wondering what I should use to make the satin not rip their seams. I have made 2 pilows, and after about a month, you could see the seams start to fray. If anyone has suggestions, I am more than happy to hear them!!! :lol:

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Serge the seams? Use an over cast stitch on the seam edges after you sew each seam?
    When you get ready to quilt, quilt 1/8" from the seam lines (on top of the seam so that you are reinforcing it again)
    Fray check all of the edges?

    Satin scares me :lol:

  3. #3
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    If you quilt it heavily it should hold well. I have used silk only on quilts that will never be washed. On my biggest one I did a top stitch about 1/8" away from the seam holding the folded seams together. It has not frayed and it is almost ten years old.

  4. #4
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    Serge the seams? Use an over cast stitch on the seam edges after you sew each seam?
    When you get ready to quilt, quilt 1/8" from the seam lines (on top of the seam so that you are reinforcing it again)
    Fray check all of the edges?

    Satin scares me :lol:
    scares me too, good luck

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    How about using fusible interfacing on the back of the satin before sewing?

  6. #6
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon321
    How about using fusible interfacing on the back of the satin before sewing?
    That was my first thought, too. And make sure you have a sharp new needle. I think if it is getting used as a bed quilt, fray-check may not be enough.

  7. #7
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    have fun and post a photo!

  8. #8
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I'm not brave enough to try satin. I bet it will be pretty though. Share pics when you get done.

  9. #9
    Member aussiequilter's Avatar
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    I have quite a deal of water-marked taffeta, or I think they call it moire taffeta, which used to be a full circle skirt and matching blouse in about 1970. The skirt and blouse were obviously way out of date but the fabrice was too good to just discard, so I unpicked it all with a view to making a crazy quilt with it. It's soft peach, cream, soft taupe and olive green colours and really very pretty.

    But that's as far as I got. I too was concerned about fraying and pin holes in the fabric, so I just haven't gone anything further with it and it's resting in my too-hard basket.

    I am following with interest what clues are out there for dealing with such fabric and say thanks in advance to anyone with solutions.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I have been lurking in the background for a while & decided to jump in on this topic. I have worked with satin & silk & found that I have the best of luck by using a french seam. That helps with the fraying & makes the seams stronger. Although, using these fabrics in a quilt would be best putting a stablizer on the back of it.


    Halo

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